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Measuring the timeliness of childhood vaccinations: Using cohort data and routine health records to evaluate quality of immunisation services / Suzanne Walton; Mario Cortina-Borja; Carol Dezateux; Lucy Griffiths; Karen Tingay; Ashley Akbari; Amrita Bandyopadhyay; Ronan A. Lyons; Helen Bedford

Vaccine, Volume: 35, Issue: 51, Pages: 7166 - 7173

Swansea University Authors: Lucy, Griffiths, Karen, Tingay, Ashley, Akbari

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Abstract

Background: To achieve full benefits of vaccination programmes, high uptake and timely receipt of vaccinations are required. Objectives: To examine uptake and timeliness of infant and pre-school booster vaccines using cohort study data linked to health records. Methods: We included 1782 children, bo...

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Published in: Vaccine
ISSN: 0264410X
Published: 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa38172
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Objectives: To examine uptake and timeliness of infant and pre-school booster vaccines using cohort study data linked to health records. Methods: We included 1782 children, born between 2000 and 2001, participating in the Millennium Cohort Study and resident in Wales, whose parents gave consent for linkage to National Community Child Health Database records at the age seven year contact. We examined age at receipt, timeliness of vaccination (early, on-time, delayed, or never), and intervals between vaccine doses, based on the recommended schedule for children at that time, of the following vaccines: primary (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (DTP), polio, Meningococcal C (Men C), Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)); first dose of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR); and pre-school childhood vaccinations (DTP, polio, MMR). We compared parental report with child health recorded MMR vaccination status at age three years. Results: While 94% of children received the first dose of primary vaccines early or on time, this was lower for subsequent doses (82%, 65% and 88% for second and third doses and pre-school booster respectively). Median intervals between doses exceeded the recommended schedule for all but the first dose with marked variation between children. There was high concordance (97%) between parental reported and child health recorded MMR status. Conclusions: Routine immunisation records provide useful information on timely receipt of vaccines and can be used to assess the quality of childhood vaccination programmes. 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spelling 2018-02-17T12:56:50.7011486 v2 38172 2018-01-17 Measuring the timeliness of childhood vaccinations: Using cohort data and routine health records to evaluate quality of immunisation services e35ea6ea4b429e812ef204b048131d93 0000-0001-9230-624X Lucy Griffiths Lucy Griffiths true false e54a01719bded3d289478a854ca6a016 0000-0002-0257-9365 Karen Tingay Karen Tingay true false aa1b025ec0243f708bb5eb0a93d6fb52 0000-0003-0814-0801 Ashley Akbari Ashley Akbari true false 2018-01-17 PMSC Background: To achieve full benefits of vaccination programmes, high uptake and timely receipt of vaccinations are required. Objectives: To examine uptake and timeliness of infant and pre-school booster vaccines using cohort study data linked to health records. Methods: We included 1782 children, born between 2000 and 2001, participating in the Millennium Cohort Study and resident in Wales, whose parents gave consent for linkage to National Community Child Health Database records at the age seven year contact. We examined age at receipt, timeliness of vaccination (early, on-time, delayed, or never), and intervals between vaccine doses, based on the recommended schedule for children at that time, of the following vaccines: primary (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (DTP), polio, Meningococcal C (Men C), Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)); first dose of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR); and pre-school childhood vaccinations (DTP, polio, MMR). We compared parental report with child health recorded MMR vaccination status at age three years. Results: While 94% of children received the first dose of primary vaccines early or on time, this was lower for subsequent doses (82%, 65% and 88% for second and third doses and pre-school booster respectively). Median intervals between doses exceeded the recommended schedule for all but the first dose with marked variation between children. There was high concordance (97%) between parental reported and child health recorded MMR status. Conclusions: Routine immunisation records provide useful information on timely receipt of vaccines and can be used to assess the quality of childhood vaccination programmes. Parental report of MMR vaccine status is reliable. Journal Article Vaccine 35 51 7166 7173 0264410X 18 12 2017 2017-12-18 10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.10.085 COLLEGE NANME Medicine COLLEGE CODE PMSC Swansea University 2018-02-17T12:56:50.7011486 2018-01-17T12:08:44.9814789 Swansea University Medical School Medicine Suzanne Walton 1 Mario Cortina-Borja 2 Carol Dezateux 3 Lucy Griffiths 0000-0001-9230-624X 4 Karen Tingay 0000-0002-0257-9365 5 Ashley Akbari 0000-0003-0814-0801 6 Amrita Bandyopadhyay 7 Ronan A. Lyons 8 Helen Bedford 9 0038172-17022018125449.pdf 38172.pdf 2018-02-17T12:54:49.2700000 Output 1141529 application/pdf Version of Record true 2018-02-17T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY). true eng
title Measuring the timeliness of childhood vaccinations: Using cohort data and routine health records to evaluate quality of immunisation services
spellingShingle Measuring the timeliness of childhood vaccinations: Using cohort data and routine health records to evaluate quality of immunisation services
Lucy, Griffiths
Karen, Tingay
Ashley, Akbari
title_short Measuring the timeliness of childhood vaccinations: Using cohort data and routine health records to evaluate quality of immunisation services
title_full Measuring the timeliness of childhood vaccinations: Using cohort data and routine health records to evaluate quality of immunisation services
title_fullStr Measuring the timeliness of childhood vaccinations: Using cohort data and routine health records to evaluate quality of immunisation services
title_full_unstemmed Measuring the timeliness of childhood vaccinations: Using cohort data and routine health records to evaluate quality of immunisation services
title_sort Measuring the timeliness of childhood vaccinations: Using cohort data and routine health records to evaluate quality of immunisation services
author_id_str_mv e35ea6ea4b429e812ef204b048131d93
e54a01719bded3d289478a854ca6a016
aa1b025ec0243f708bb5eb0a93d6fb52
author_id_fullname_str_mv e35ea6ea4b429e812ef204b048131d93_***_Lucy, Griffiths
e54a01719bded3d289478a854ca6a016_***_Karen, Tingay
aa1b025ec0243f708bb5eb0a93d6fb52_***_Ashley, Akbari
author Lucy, Griffiths
Karen, Tingay
Ashley, Akbari
author2 Suzanne Walton
Mario Cortina-Borja
Carol Dezateux
Lucy Griffiths
Karen Tingay
Ashley Akbari
Amrita Bandyopadhyay
Ronan A. Lyons
Helen Bedford
format Journal article
container_title Vaccine
container_volume 35
container_issue 51
container_start_page 7166
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 0264410X
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.10.085
college_str Swansea University Medical School
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_top_title Swansea University Medical School
hierarchy_parent_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_parent_title Swansea University Medical School
department_str Medicine{{{_:::_}}}Swansea University Medical School{{{_:::_}}}Medicine
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description Background: To achieve full benefits of vaccination programmes, high uptake and timely receipt of vaccinations are required. Objectives: To examine uptake and timeliness of infant and pre-school booster vaccines using cohort study data linked to health records. Methods: We included 1782 children, born between 2000 and 2001, participating in the Millennium Cohort Study and resident in Wales, whose parents gave consent for linkage to National Community Child Health Database records at the age seven year contact. We examined age at receipt, timeliness of vaccination (early, on-time, delayed, or never), and intervals between vaccine doses, based on the recommended schedule for children at that time, of the following vaccines: primary (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (DTP), polio, Meningococcal C (Men C), Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)); first dose of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR); and pre-school childhood vaccinations (DTP, polio, MMR). We compared parental report with child health recorded MMR vaccination status at age three years. Results: While 94% of children received the first dose of primary vaccines early or on time, this was lower for subsequent doses (82%, 65% and 88% for second and third doses and pre-school booster respectively). Median intervals between doses exceeded the recommended schedule for all but the first dose with marked variation between children. There was high concordance (97%) between parental reported and child health recorded MMR status. Conclusions: Routine immunisation records provide useful information on timely receipt of vaccines and can be used to assess the quality of childhood vaccination programmes. Parental report of MMR vaccine status is reliable.
published_date 2017-12-18T03:58:35Z
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