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Assessing rugby place kick performance from initial ball flight kinematics: development, validation and application of a new measure

Alexandra Atack, Grant Trewartha, Neil Bezodis Orcid Logo

Sports Biomechanics, Volume: 18, Issue: 5, Pages: 457 - 469

Swansea University Author: Neil Bezodis Orcid Logo

Abstract

The appropriate determination of performance outcome is critical when appraising a performer’s technique. Previous studies of rugby place kicking technique have typically assessed performance based on ball velocity, but this is not the sole requirement. Therefore, a mathematical model of rugby place...

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Published in: Sports Biomechanics
ISSN: 1476-3141 1752-6116
Published: 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa38287
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first_indexed 2018-01-24T13:11:33Z
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spelling 2020-06-30T11:12:23.5065426 v2 38287 2018-01-24 Assessing rugby place kick performance from initial ball flight kinematics: development, validation and application of a new measure 534588568c1936e94e1ed8527b8c991b 0000-0003-2229-3310 Neil Bezodis Neil Bezodis true false 2018-01-24 STSC The appropriate determination of performance outcome is critical when appraising a performer’s technique. Previous studies of rugby place kicking technique have typically assessed performance based on ball velocity, but this is not the sole requirement. Therefore, a mathematical model of rugby place kick ball flight was developed to yield a single measure more representative of true performance. The model, which requires only initial ball flight kinematics, was calibrated and validated using empirical place kick data, and found to predict ball position with a mean error of 4.0% after 22 m of ball flight. The model was then applied to the performances of 33 place kickers. The predicted maximum distance, a single performance measure which accounted for initial ball velocity magnitude and direction, and spin, was determined using the model and was compared against ball velocity magnitude. A moderate association in the rank-order of the kicks between these two measures (ρ = 0.52) revealed that the relative success of the kicks would be assessed differently with each measure. The developed model provides a representative measure of place kick performance that is understandable for coaches, and can be used to predict changes in performance outcome under different ball launch or environmental conditions. Journal Article Sports Biomechanics 18 5 457 469 1476-3141 1752-6116 Aerodynamics, biomechanics, kicking, model, simulation 31 12 2018 2018-12-31 10.1080/14763141.2018.1433714 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2020-06-30T11:12:23.5065426 2018-01-24T08:56:04.6707602 College of Engineering Sports Science Alexandra Atack 1 Grant Trewartha 2 Neil Bezodis 0000-0003-2229-3310 3 0038287-24012018085832.pdf atack2018.pdf 2018-01-24T08:58:32.6870000 Output 674389 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2019-10-09T00:00:00.0000000 false eng
title Assessing rugby place kick performance from initial ball flight kinematics: development, validation and application of a new measure
spellingShingle Assessing rugby place kick performance from initial ball flight kinematics: development, validation and application of a new measure
Neil Bezodis
title_short Assessing rugby place kick performance from initial ball flight kinematics: development, validation and application of a new measure
title_full Assessing rugby place kick performance from initial ball flight kinematics: development, validation and application of a new measure
title_fullStr Assessing rugby place kick performance from initial ball flight kinematics: development, validation and application of a new measure
title_full_unstemmed Assessing rugby place kick performance from initial ball flight kinematics: development, validation and application of a new measure
title_sort Assessing rugby place kick performance from initial ball flight kinematics: development, validation and application of a new measure
author_id_str_mv 534588568c1936e94e1ed8527b8c991b
author_id_fullname_str_mv 534588568c1936e94e1ed8527b8c991b_***_Neil Bezodis
author Neil Bezodis
author2 Alexandra Atack
Grant Trewartha
Neil Bezodis
format Journal article
container_title Sports Biomechanics
container_volume 18
container_issue 5
container_start_page 457
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 1476-3141
1752-6116
doi_str_mv 10.1080/14763141.2018.1433714
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description The appropriate determination of performance outcome is critical when appraising a performer’s technique. Previous studies of rugby place kicking technique have typically assessed performance based on ball velocity, but this is not the sole requirement. Therefore, a mathematical model of rugby place kick ball flight was developed to yield a single measure more representative of true performance. The model, which requires only initial ball flight kinematics, was calibrated and validated using empirical place kick data, and found to predict ball position with a mean error of 4.0% after 22 m of ball flight. The model was then applied to the performances of 33 place kickers. The predicted maximum distance, a single performance measure which accounted for initial ball velocity magnitude and direction, and spin, was determined using the model and was compared against ball velocity magnitude. A moderate association in the rank-order of the kicks between these two measures (ρ = 0.52) revealed that the relative success of the kicks would be assessed differently with each measure. The developed model provides a representative measure of place kick performance that is understandable for coaches, and can be used to predict changes in performance outcome under different ball launch or environmental conditions.
published_date 2018-12-31T04:04:16Z
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score 10.871765