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Socially informed dispersal in a territorial cooperative breeder / Gabriele Cozzi; Nino Maag; Luca Börger; Tim H. Clutton-Brock; Arpat Ozgul

Journal of Animal Ecology

Swansea University Author: Borger, Luca

Abstract

Dispersal is a key process governing the dynamics of socially and spatially structured populations, and involves three distinct stages: emigration, transience, and settlement. At each stage, individuals have to make movement decisions, which are influenced by social, environmental, and individual fa...

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Published in: Journal of Animal Ecology
ISSN: 00218790
Published: 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa38361
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Yet, a comprehensive understanding of the drivers that influence such decisions is still lacking, particularly for the transient stage during which free-living individuals are inherently difficult to follow.Social circumstances such as the likelihood of encountering conspecifics can be expected to strongly affects decision making during dispersal, particularly in territorial species where encounters with resident conspecifics are antagonistic. Here we analyzed the movement trajectories of 47 dispersing coalitions of Kalahari meerkats (Suricata suricatta) through a landscape occupied by constantly monitored resident groups, while simultaneously taking into account environmental and individual characteristics.We used GPS locations collected on resident groups to create a geo-referenced social landscape representing the likelihood of encountering resident groups. We used a step-selection function to infer the effect of social, environmental and individual covariates on habitat selection during dispersal. Lastly, we created a temporal mismatch between the social landscape and the dispersal event of interest to identify the temporal scale at which dispersers perceive the social landscape.Including information about the social landscape considerably improved our representation of the dispersal trajectory, compared to analyses that only accounted for environmental variables. The latter were only marginally selected or avoided by dispersers. Before leaving their natal territory, dispersers selected areas frequently used by their natal group. In contrast, after leaving their natal territory, they selectively used areas where they were less likely to encounter unrelated groups. This pattern was particularly marked in larger dispersing coalitions and when unrelated males were part of the dispersing coalition.Our results suggest that, in socially and spatially structured species, dispersers gather and process social information during dispersal, and that reducing risk of aggression from unrelated resident groups outweighs benefits derived from conspecific attraction. 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spelling 2018-02-19T13:31:01Z v2 38361 2018-01-31 Socially informed dispersal in a territorial cooperative breeder Luca Borger Luca Borger true 0000-0001-8763-5997 false 8416d0ffc3cccdad6e6d67a455e7c4a2 be657dee57d87983ff5a094becb4144d KrNKIcwalNUkyxqMTsbkl9yvqZQRJmUl2lxhnzSZE7o= 2018-01-31 SBI Dispersal is a key process governing the dynamics of socially and spatially structured populations, and involves three distinct stages: emigration, transience, and settlement. At each stage, individuals have to make movement decisions, which are influenced by social, environmental, and individual factors. Yet, a comprehensive understanding of the drivers that influence such decisions is still lacking, particularly for the transient stage during which free-living individuals are inherently difficult to follow.Social circumstances such as the likelihood of encountering conspecifics can be expected to strongly affects decision making during dispersal, particularly in territorial species where encounters with resident conspecifics are antagonistic. Here we analyzed the movement trajectories of 47 dispersing coalitions of Kalahari meerkats (Suricata suricatta) through a landscape occupied by constantly monitored resident groups, while simultaneously taking into account environmental and individual characteristics.We used GPS locations collected on resident groups to create a geo-referenced social landscape representing the likelihood of encountering resident groups. We used a step-selection function to infer the effect of social, environmental and individual covariates on habitat selection during dispersal. Lastly, we created a temporal mismatch between the social landscape and the dispersal event of interest to identify the temporal scale at which dispersers perceive the social landscape.Including information about the social landscape considerably improved our representation of the dispersal trajectory, compared to analyses that only accounted for environmental variables. The latter were only marginally selected or avoided by dispersers. Before leaving their natal territory, dispersers selected areas frequently used by their natal group. In contrast, after leaving their natal territory, they selectively used areas where they were less likely to encounter unrelated groups. This pattern was particularly marked in larger dispersing coalitions and when unrelated males were part of the dispersing coalition.Our results suggest that, in socially and spatially structured species, dispersers gather and process social information during dispersal, and that reducing risk of aggression from unrelated resident groups outweighs benefits derived from conspecific attraction. Finally, our work underlines the intimate link between the social structure of a population and dispersal, which affect each other reciprocally. Journal article Journal of Animal Ecology 00218790 Conspecific avoidance, informed dispersal, movement, social landscape, step selection, Suricata suricatta 12 2 2018 2018-02-12 10.1111/1365-2656.12795 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2656.12795/full College of Science Biosciences CSCI SBI Swansea Lab for Animal Movement None 2018-02-19T13:31:01Z 2018-01-31T15:48:03Z College of Science Biosciences Gabriele Cozzi 1 Nino Maag 2 Luca Börger 3 Tim H. Clutton-Brock 4 Arpat Ozgul 5 0038361-31012018155247.pdf GCozzi_Dispersalinasociallandscape_JAE_revised.pdf 2018-01-31T15:52:47Z Output 766740 application/pdf AM true Updated Copyright 19/02/2018 2019-01-18T00:00:00 true eng
title Socially informed dispersal in a territorial cooperative breeder
spellingShingle Socially informed dispersal in a territorial cooperative breeder
Borger, Luca
title_short Socially informed dispersal in a territorial cooperative breeder
title_full Socially informed dispersal in a territorial cooperative breeder
title_fullStr Socially informed dispersal in a territorial cooperative breeder
title_full_unstemmed Socially informed dispersal in a territorial cooperative breeder
title_sort Socially informed dispersal in a territorial cooperative breeder
author_id_str_mv 8416d0ffc3cccdad6e6d67a455e7c4a2
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8416d0ffc3cccdad6e6d67a455e7c4a2_***_Borger, Luca
author Borger, Luca
author2 Gabriele Cozzi
Nino Maag
Luca Börger
Tim H. Clutton-Brock
Arpat Ozgul
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Animal Ecology
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 00218790
doi_str_mv 10.1111/1365-2656.12795
college_str College of Science
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
url http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2656.12795/full
document_store_str 1
active_str 1
researchgroup_str Swansea Lab for Animal Movement
description Dispersal is a key process governing the dynamics of socially and spatially structured populations, and involves three distinct stages: emigration, transience, and settlement. At each stage, individuals have to make movement decisions, which are influenced by social, environmental, and individual factors. Yet, a comprehensive understanding of the drivers that influence such decisions is still lacking, particularly for the transient stage during which free-living individuals are inherently difficult to follow.Social circumstances such as the likelihood of encountering conspecifics can be expected to strongly affects decision making during dispersal, particularly in territorial species where encounters with resident conspecifics are antagonistic. Here we analyzed the movement trajectories of 47 dispersing coalitions of Kalahari meerkats (Suricata suricatta) through a landscape occupied by constantly monitored resident groups, while simultaneously taking into account environmental and individual characteristics.We used GPS locations collected on resident groups to create a geo-referenced social landscape representing the likelihood of encountering resident groups. We used a step-selection function to infer the effect of social, environmental and individual covariates on habitat selection during dispersal. Lastly, we created a temporal mismatch between the social landscape and the dispersal event of interest to identify the temporal scale at which dispersers perceive the social landscape.Including information about the social landscape considerably improved our representation of the dispersal trajectory, compared to analyses that only accounted for environmental variables. The latter were only marginally selected or avoided by dispersers. Before leaving their natal territory, dispersers selected areas frequently used by their natal group. In contrast, after leaving their natal territory, they selectively used areas where they were less likely to encounter unrelated groups. This pattern was particularly marked in larger dispersing coalitions and when unrelated males were part of the dispersing coalition.Our results suggest that, in socially and spatially structured species, dispersers gather and process social information during dispersal, and that reducing risk of aggression from unrelated resident groups outweighs benefits derived from conspecific attraction. Finally, our work underlines the intimate link between the social structure of a population and dispersal, which affect each other reciprocally.
published_date 2018-02-12T04:57:17Z
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score 10.847605