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Electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices inspired by nature

P Meredith, C J Bettinger, M Irimia-Vladu, A B Mostert, P E Schwenn, Paul Meredith Orcid Logo, Bernard Mostert Orcid Logo

Reports on Progress in Physics, Volume: 76, Issue: 3, Start page: 034501

Swansea University Authors: Paul Meredith Orcid Logo, Bernard Mostert Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Inorganic semiconductors permeate virtually every sphere of modern human existence. Micro-fabricated memory elements, processors, sensors, circuit elements, lasers, displays, detectors, etc are ubiquitous. However, the dawn of the 21st century has brought with it immense new challenges, and indeed o...

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Published in: Reports on Progress in Physics
ISSN: 0034-4885 1361-6633
Published: 2013
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa38484
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spelling 2018-02-09T13:01:53.9900978 v2 38484 2018-02-09 Electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices inspired by nature 31e8fe57fa180d418afd48c3af280c2e 0000-0002-9049-7414 Paul Meredith Paul Meredith true false a353503c976a7338c7708a32e82f451f 0000-0002-9590-2124 Bernard Mostert Bernard Mostert true false 2018-02-09 SPH Inorganic semiconductors permeate virtually every sphere of modern human existence. Micro-fabricated memory elements, processors, sensors, circuit elements, lasers, displays, detectors, etc are ubiquitous. However, the dawn of the 21st century has brought with it immense new challenges, and indeed opportunities—some of which require a paradigm shift in the way we think about resource use and disposal, which in turn directly impacts our ongoing relationship with inorganic semiconductors such as silicon and gallium arsenide. Furthermore, advances in fields such as nano-medicine and bioelectronics, and the impending revolution of the 'ubiquitous sensor network', all require new functional materials which are bio-compatible, cheap, have minimal embedded manufacturing energy plus extremely low power consumption, and are mechanically robust and flexible for integration with tissues, building structures, fabrics and all manner of hosts. In this short review article we summarize current progress in creating materials with such properties. We focus primarily on organic and bio-organic electronic and optoelectronic systems derived from or inspired by nature, and outline the complex charge transport and photo-physics which control their behaviour. We also introduce the concept of electrical devices based upon ion or proton flow ('ionics and protonics') and focus particularly on their role as a signal interface with biological systems. Finally, we highlight recent advances in creating working devices, some of which have bio-inspired architectures, and summarize the current issues, challenges and potential solutions. This is a rich new playground for the modern materials physicist. Journal Article Reports on Progress in Physics 76 3 034501 0034-4885 1361-6633 14 2 2013 2013-02-14 10.1088/0034-4885/76/3/034501 COLLEGE NANME Physics COLLEGE CODE SPH Swansea University 2018-02-09T13:01:53.9900978 2018-02-09T13:01:54.0056945 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Physics P Meredith 1 C J Bettinger 2 M Irimia-Vladu 3 A B Mostert 4 P E Schwenn 5 Paul Meredith 0000-0002-9049-7414 6 Bernard Mostert 0000-0002-9590-2124 7
title Electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices inspired by nature
spellingShingle Electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices inspired by nature
Paul Meredith
Bernard Mostert
title_short Electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices inspired by nature
title_full Electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices inspired by nature
title_fullStr Electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices inspired by nature
title_full_unstemmed Electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices inspired by nature
title_sort Electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices inspired by nature
author_id_str_mv 31e8fe57fa180d418afd48c3af280c2e
a353503c976a7338c7708a32e82f451f
author_id_fullname_str_mv 31e8fe57fa180d418afd48c3af280c2e_***_Paul Meredith
a353503c976a7338c7708a32e82f451f_***_Bernard Mostert
author Paul Meredith
Bernard Mostert
author2 P Meredith
C J Bettinger
M Irimia-Vladu
A B Mostert
P E Schwenn
Paul Meredith
Bernard Mostert
format Journal article
container_title Reports on Progress in Physics
container_volume 76
container_issue 3
container_start_page 034501
publishDate 2013
institution Swansea University
issn 0034-4885
1361-6633
doi_str_mv 10.1088/0034-4885/76/3/034501
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Physics{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Physics
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description Inorganic semiconductors permeate virtually every sphere of modern human existence. Micro-fabricated memory elements, processors, sensors, circuit elements, lasers, displays, detectors, etc are ubiquitous. However, the dawn of the 21st century has brought with it immense new challenges, and indeed opportunities—some of which require a paradigm shift in the way we think about resource use and disposal, which in turn directly impacts our ongoing relationship with inorganic semiconductors such as silicon and gallium arsenide. Furthermore, advances in fields such as nano-medicine and bioelectronics, and the impending revolution of the 'ubiquitous sensor network', all require new functional materials which are bio-compatible, cheap, have minimal embedded manufacturing energy plus extremely low power consumption, and are mechanically robust and flexible for integration with tissues, building structures, fabrics and all manner of hosts. In this short review article we summarize current progress in creating materials with such properties. We focus primarily on organic and bio-organic electronic and optoelectronic systems derived from or inspired by nature, and outline the complex charge transport and photo-physics which control their behaviour. We also introduce the concept of electrical devices based upon ion or proton flow ('ionics and protonics') and focus particularly on their role as a signal interface with biological systems. Finally, we highlight recent advances in creating working devices, some of which have bio-inspired architectures, and summarize the current issues, challenges and potential solutions. This is a rich new playground for the modern materials physicist.
published_date 2013-02-14T03:48:40Z
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