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Relationship between Sedentary Time, Physical Activity and Multiple Lifestyle Factors in Children / Michael Sheldrick, Richard Tyler, Kelly Mackintosh, Gareth Stratton

Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology, Volume: 3, Issue: 1, Start page: 15

Swansea University Authors: Kelly Mackintosh, Gareth Stratton

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DOI (Published version): 10.3390/jfmk3010015

Abstract

An improved understanding of relationships between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), screen-time and lifestyle factors is imperative for developing interventions, yet few studies have explored such relationships simultaneously. Therefore, the study’s aim was to examine the relationship...

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Published in: Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology
ISSN: 2411-5142
Published: 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa38854
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Abstract: An improved understanding of relationships between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), screen-time and lifestyle factors is imperative for developing interventions, yet few studies have explored such relationships simultaneously. Therefore, the study’s aim was to examine the relationship between sufficient MVPA (≥60 min·day–1) and excessive screen-time (>2 h·day–1) with lifestyle factors in children. In total, 756 children (10.4 ± 0.6 years) completed a questionnaire, which assessed sleep duration, MVPA, homework/reading, screen-time and diet, and a 20 metre multi-stage shuttle run test to assess cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). Body mass and stature were measured and used to calculate BMI (body mass index) for age/sex z-scores. Fruit and vegetable consumption and CRF were positively associated with sufficient MVPA, irrespective of sex (p < 0.05). Excessive screen-time was positively associated with sugary snack consumption in boys and girls, and diet soft drink intake in boys (p < 0.05). In addition, excessive screen-time was negatively associated with MVPA before school for both boys and girls, as well as with sleep duration and fruit and vegetable consumption for girls (p < 0.05). Sufficient MVPA and excessive screen-time were associated with healthy and unhealthy factors, respectively, with relationships sometimes differing by sex. Future health promoting interventions should consider targeting change in multiple lifestyle factors.
Keywords: youth; moderate-to-vigorous physical activity; screen-time; health; diet; behaviours
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 1
Start Page: 15