No Cover Image

Journal article 450 views 63 downloads

The invasive, non-native slipper limpet Crepidula fornicata is poorly adapted to sediment burial / Chloe Powell-Jennings; Ruth Callaway

Marine Pollution Bulletin, Volume: 130, Pages: 95 - 104

Swansea University Author: Ruth, Callaway

  • 38957.pdf

    PDF | Accepted Manuscript

    Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License (CC-BY-NC-ND).

    Download (960.05KB)

Abstract

The American slipper limpet Crepidula fornicata is an invasive, non-native species (INNS) abundant along the Europeancoast. Its further distribution may be facilitated by activities such as dredging and spoil disposal, and theaim of this study was to assess whether C. fornicata is able to survive se...

Full description

Published in: Marine Pollution Bulletin
ISSN: 0025326X
Published: Elsevier 2018
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa38957
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: The American slipper limpet Crepidula fornicata is an invasive, non-native species (INNS) abundant along the Europeancoast. Its further distribution may be facilitated by activities such as dredging and spoil disposal, and theaim of this study was to assess whether C. fornicata is able to survive sediment burial. The slipper limpet wasfound attached to hard substratum in intertidal areas, but it was absent at a nearby subtidal dredge spoil site. Inlaboratory experiments 22% of C. fornicata emerged when buried under a 2cm sediment-layer; only half of themsurvived. When buried under ≥6cm none re-surfaced or survived. The results provided evidence that C. fornicatais poorly adapted to adjust its vertical position in sediment and is killed by sudden burial underneath 2 to 6cm ofsediment. The combined laboratory experiments and field surveys suggested that C. fornicata has limited scopeto survive the dredge spoil disposal process.
Keywords: Crepidula fornicata, Swansea Bay tidal lagoon, Dredge spoil disposal, Coastal infrastructure, Invasive non-native species
College: College of Science
Start Page: 95
End Page: 104