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Postcolonialism Revisited / Kirsti Bohata

University of Wales Press

Swansea University Author: Kirsti Bohata

Abstract

'...a thorough and erudite discussion...Bohata performs an admirable and fair-minded feat in weighing up the pros and cons of such an approach in her excellent opening chapter.' 'As a postcolonial theoretical intervention which takes a materialistic view of literary production, Bohata...

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Published in: University of Wales Press
ISBN: 978-0708318928
Published: 2004
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa39022
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Abstract: '...a thorough and erudite discussion...Bohata performs an admirable and fair-minded feat in weighing up the pros and cons of such an approach in her excellent opening chapter.' 'As a postcolonial theoretical intervention which takes a materialistic view of literary production, Bohata's book could hardly be bettered. As such, it is a very welcome addition to a critical field which is now really coming of age.' Planet 'This is a persuasive, illuminating and powerfully argued book. The range of writers chosen to support Bohata's case ... is impressive, and discussions of their work are integrated seamlessly and productively within the book's broader concerns. Indeed, a genuinely productive engagement of theory and text is one of Postcolonial Revisited's key achievements, Bohata's dialectical readings of the two rewarding the reader with a greatly enriched understanding of both'. New Welsh Review '...Bohata's pioneering work promises to widen the Celtic postcolonial map further to embrace what has proved to be the most intractable terrain of Welsh writing. There is much...here that is of interest, not only to those interested in Welsh literature, culture and history, but to anyone curious about the ongoing reverberations and transformations of post colonialism...This nuanced and engaging study promises to become a central text in the new and evidently fecund critical ground of Wales and colonialism'. Modern Language Review
College: College of Arts and Humanities