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Philosophy of Sports Medicine / Silvia Camporesi; Mike McNamee

Handbook of the Philosophy of Medicine

Swansea University Author: McNamee, Michael

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DOI (Published version): 10.1007/978-94-017-8688-1_33

Abstract

The focus of this chapter is on the philosophy of Sports Medicine, that is, the practice of medicine in the context of sport. The chapter begins by examining ways in which a distinction in kind can be claimed between Sports Medicine and medicine per se. It does this by focussing first on the goals o...

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Published in: Handbook of the Philosophy of Medicine
ISBN: 978-94-017-8687-4 978-94-017-8688-1
Published: Dordrecht Springer 2017
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa39080
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Abstract: The focus of this chapter is on the philosophy of Sports Medicine, that is, the practice of medicine in the context of sport. The chapter begins by examining ways in which a distinction in kind can be claimed between Sports Medicine and medicine per se. It does this by focussing first on the goals of medicine. This strategy proves to be indecisive, and it is concluded that a difference in degree only, rather than in kind, can be claimed for Sports Medicine. However, when the focus is directed to the normative aspects of medicine per se, in comparison with Sports Medicine, important differences can be identified. These differences concern, especially, the way in which normative concepts central to medicine per se are operationalized in Sports Medicine. It is shown how norms regarding privacy, confidentiality, autonomy, and paternalism all apply in significantly different ways in the sporting context. Parallel differences are also identified in relation to the therapy/enhancement distinction. The problem of balancing current sporting goals against long-term health is also discussed.
Keywords: Sports Medicine, Sports physicians, Goals of medicine, Exercise, Privacy, Medicalization, Autonomy, Therapy/enhancement distinction, Bloodgate
College: College of Engineering
End Page: 755