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Geographical Perspectives on Transport and Ageing / Charles Musselwhite; Angela Curl

Geographies of Transport and Ageing, Pages: 3 - 24

Swansea University Author: Musselwhite, Charles

  • Accepted Manuscript under embargo until: 1st May 2020

DOI (Published version): 10.1007/978-3-319-76360-6_1

Abstract

In terms of ageing, we are living in unprecedented times. People across the globe are living longer than ever before and societies are ageing at increasing rates. In low to middle income countries reductions in mortality at young ages have fuelled this growth. A person born today in Brazil, for exam...

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Published in: Geographies of Transport and Ageing
ISBN: 978-3-319-76359-0 978-3-319-76360-6
Published: Cham, Switzerland Springer 2018
Online Access: https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-76360-6_1
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa39994
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Abstract: In terms of ageing, we are living in unprecedented times. People across the globe are living longer than ever before and societies are ageing at increasing rates. In low to middle income countries reductions in mortality at young ages have fuelled this growth. A person born today in Brazil, for example, can expect to live 20 years longer than someone born 50 years ago (WHO, 2015). For the first time life expectancy across the globe is over 60 years of age. In high Income countries, someone born now can expect to live up to around 80 years of age on average (ONS, 2015). There are not simply a growing number of older people, but also a growing number of older people as a total percentage of the population due to people living longer and declining birth rates in many countries. Across Europe, for example, people aged over 65 years will account for 29.5% of the population in 2060 compared to around 19% now (EUROSTAT, 2017). The share of those aged 80 years or above across Europe will almost triple by 2060 (EUROSTAT, 2017)The macro level demographics and associated trends mask big differences within the ageing populations. There can be as much as 10 years difference in life expectancy within high income countries, for example in the UK someone born a baby boy born in Kensington and Chelsea has a life expectancy of 83.3 years, compared with a boy born in Glasgow who has a life expectancy of 10 years lower (73.0 years) (ONS, 2015). For newborn baby girls, life expectancy is highest in Chiltern at 86.7 years and 8 years lower Glasgow at 78.5 years (ONS, 2015; NRS, 2016). There is also considerable variation within cities, spatially and socially.This volume brings together contributions from a broad range of human geographers, with different disciplinary perspectives of transport and ageing. This chapter outlines some of the key contemporary issues for an ageing society in terms of transport and mobility, highlights the importance of considering transport and mobility for ageing populations and outlines the contribution that a geographical approach can offer to studies of transport and ageing.
Keywords: Ageing, cultural geography, human geography, gerontology, transport, mobility, mobilities, travel, health, wellbeing, needs and motivations
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Start Page: 3
End Page: 24