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Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract 343 views

Improving modelling of complex geometries in novel materials using 3D imaging / Llion Evans, Lee Margetts, Peter D. Lee, Celia Butler, Elizabeth Surrey

Structural Materials for Innovative Nuclear Systems

Swansea University Author: Llion Evans

Abstract

Finite element methods (FEM) modelling of materials with complex microstructures is typically achieved by homogenisation and applying effective material properties. This work investigated the use of a technique whereby 3D X-ray tomography images of such materials are converted directly into image-ba...

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Published in: Structural Materials for Innovative Nuclear Systems
Published: Manchester, UK NEA International Workshop on Structural Materials for Innovative Nuclear Systems 2016
Online Access: https://www.oecd-nea.org/science/smins4/documents/P1-18_LlME_SMINS4_paper_reviewed.pdf
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa39999
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Abstract: Finite element methods (FEM) modelling of materials with complex microstructures is typically achieved by homogenisation and applying effective material properties. This work investigated the use of a technique whereby 3D X-ray tomography images of such materials are converted directly into image-based FEM (IBFEM) models. In this instance IBFEM was used to model graphite foam on the micro-scale. The application was as a functional layer within a heat exchange component for a fusion energy device. IBFEM accounts for anisotropy in performance by considering the geometry and the properties of the parent material, i.e. carbon, rather than those of the bulk material. Results from the IBFEM model were compared with a standard homogenised model and showed a strong level of agreement, thus validating the technique's implementation. The added benefits of the IBFEM model are; improved accuracy due to modelling on the micro-scale; ability to interrogate results to an increased spatial resolution; no requirement to experimentally measure bulk material properties of novel anisotropic materials.
College: College of Engineering