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The UK Innocence Movement: Past, Present, and Future? / Holly Greenwood

Understanding Wrongful Conviction: The protection of the innocent across Europe and America, Pages: 163 - 191

Swansea University Author: Greenwood, Holly

  • Accepted Manuscript under embargo until: 9th May 2020

Abstract

This chapter drew on original empirical data to explore the state of ‘UK innocence movement’, which refers to the development and operation of innocence projects (hereafter IPs) across the UK. This was the first research to examine IPs in the UK and was funded by the Economic and Research Council. I...

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Published in: Understanding Wrongful Conviction: The protection of the innocent across Europe and America
ISBN: 978-88-13-35337-7
Published: Wolters Kluwer Italia Srl 2015
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa40034
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IPs originated in the United States and are typically university based clinics in which law students investigate claims of alleged miscarriages of justice. Approximately 38 IPs were established in the UK between 2004 and 2014; the rapid spread of such projects has led to this being referred to as the 'UK innocence movement'. The combination of a trend towards clinical legal education in the UK and the rapidly increasing number of IPs suggested that the UK innocence movement was going from strength to strength. However, by 2014, after ten years in operation, IPs had only ever had three cases referred to the Court of Appeal and these were from only two universities; furthermore, in the summer of 2014, Michael Naughton announced he would be closing the Innocence Network UK (INUK) as a membership organisation for IPs. This marked the beginning of a period of instability and uncertainty for UK IPs as many relied on INUK to screen suitable cases, to provide training and to set national standards. This chapter was written in 2015, which was a critical time for the UK &#x2018;innocence movement&#x2019;. Drawing on 19 semi-structured interviews with leaders of IPs and other similar clinics, this chapter discusses the origins of the UK innocence movement, reflects on its position in 2015, and then considers the future landscape for IPs. This chapter discusses a number of problems that participants identified with the UK movement, including systemic challenges, difficulties within the network, and tensions within the IP model. It illustrates how despite a decline in the number of university IPs, there were many intending to continue; and that rather than seeing this as a period of decline, many participants saw this as a period of evolution. 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spelling 2018-08-23T12:36:28Z v2 40034 2018-05-09 The UK Innocence Movement: Past, Present, and Future? Holly Greenwood Holly Greenwood true 0000-0002-4485-6527 false e305dd490b12881383f3a5fefa3a1e72 b4f7ad41e564c91276d7e0204f5d2ead Z+kTG/3qQ8nvKBUs5wPO3h8j7kl4zZwebz0wEHEQAUk= 2018-05-09 LAWD This chapter drew on original empirical data to explore the state of ‘UK innocence movement’, which refers to the development and operation of innocence projects (hereafter IPs) across the UK. This was the first research to examine IPs in the UK and was funded by the Economic and Research Council. IPs originated in the United States and are typically university based clinics in which law students investigate claims of alleged miscarriages of justice. Approximately 38 IPs were established in the UK between 2004 and 2014; the rapid spread of such projects has led to this being referred to as the 'UK innocence movement'. The combination of a trend towards clinical legal education in the UK and the rapidly increasing number of IPs suggested that the UK innocence movement was going from strength to strength. However, by 2014, after ten years in operation, IPs had only ever had three cases referred to the Court of Appeal and these were from only two universities; furthermore, in the summer of 2014, Michael Naughton announced he would be closing the Innocence Network UK (INUK) as a membership organisation for IPs. This marked the beginning of a period of instability and uncertainty for UK IPs as many relied on INUK to screen suitable cases, to provide training and to set national standards. This chapter was written in 2015, which was a critical time for the UK ‘innocence movement’. Drawing on 19 semi-structured interviews with leaders of IPs and other similar clinics, this chapter discusses the origins of the UK innocence movement, reflects on its position in 2015, and then considers the future landscape for IPs. This chapter discusses a number of problems that participants identified with the UK movement, including systemic challenges, difficulties within the network, and tensions within the IP model. It illustrates how despite a decline in the number of university IPs, there were many intending to continue; and that rather than seeing this as a period of decline, many participants saw this as a period of evolution. This chapter concludes that the future might see a phasing out of the IP model, but this would be replaced with a new emerging model of university miscarriage of justice clinics. Chapter in book Understanding Wrongful Conviction: The protection of the innocent across Europe and America 163 191 Wolters Kluwer Italia Srl 978-88-13-35337-7 innocence projects, UK innocence movement, miscarriages of justice, clinical legal education, criminal appeals 28 10 2015 2015-10-28 Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law Legal Studies CLAW LAWD Criminal Justice and Criminology None 2018-08-23T12:36:28Z 2018-05-09T08:42:24Z Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law Legal Studies Holly Greenwood 1 Under embargo Under embargo 2018-05-09T08:43:28Z Output 58909 application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document AM true Published to Cronfa 09/05/2018 2020-05-09T00:00:00 false eng Under embargo Under embargo 2018-05-09T10:22:05Z Output 359098 application/pdf AM true Published to Cronfa 09/05/2018 2020-05-09T00:00:00 false eng
title The UK Innocence Movement: Past, Present, and Future?
spellingShingle The UK Innocence Movement: Past, Present, and Future?
Greenwood, Holly
title_short The UK Innocence Movement: Past, Present, and Future?
title_full The UK Innocence Movement: Past, Present, and Future?
title_fullStr The UK Innocence Movement: Past, Present, and Future?
title_full_unstemmed The UK Innocence Movement: Past, Present, and Future?
title_sort The UK Innocence Movement: Past, Present, and Future?
author_id_str_mv e305dd490b12881383f3a5fefa3a1e72
author_id_fullname_str_mv e305dd490b12881383f3a5fefa3a1e72_***_Greenwood, Holly
author Greenwood, Holly
author2 Holly Greenwood
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researchgroup_str Criminal Justice and Criminology
description This chapter drew on original empirical data to explore the state of ‘UK innocence movement’, which refers to the development and operation of innocence projects (hereafter IPs) across the UK. This was the first research to examine IPs in the UK and was funded by the Economic and Research Council. IPs originated in the United States and are typically university based clinics in which law students investigate claims of alleged miscarriages of justice. Approximately 38 IPs were established in the UK between 2004 and 2014; the rapid spread of such projects has led to this being referred to as the 'UK innocence movement'. The combination of a trend towards clinical legal education in the UK and the rapidly increasing number of IPs suggested that the UK innocence movement was going from strength to strength. However, by 2014, after ten years in operation, IPs had only ever had three cases referred to the Court of Appeal and these were from only two universities; furthermore, in the summer of 2014, Michael Naughton announced he would be closing the Innocence Network UK (INUK) as a membership organisation for IPs. This marked the beginning of a period of instability and uncertainty for UK IPs as many relied on INUK to screen suitable cases, to provide training and to set national standards. This chapter was written in 2015, which was a critical time for the UK ‘innocence movement’. Drawing on 19 semi-structured interviews with leaders of IPs and other similar clinics, this chapter discusses the origins of the UK innocence movement, reflects on its position in 2015, and then considers the future landscape for IPs. This chapter discusses a number of problems that participants identified with the UK movement, including systemic challenges, difficulties within the network, and tensions within the IP model. It illustrates how despite a decline in the number of university IPs, there were many intending to continue; and that rather than seeing this as a period of decline, many participants saw this as a period of evolution. This chapter concludes that the future might see a phasing out of the IP model, but this would be replaced with a new emerging model of university miscarriage of justice clinics.
published_date 2015-10-28T21:06:09Z
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