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Wearable Activity Tracker Use Among Australian Adolescents: Usability and Acceptability Study / Nicola D Ridgers, Anna Timperio, Helen Brown, Kylie Ball, Susie Macfarlane, Samuel K Lai, Kara Richards, Kelly Mackintosh, Melitta McNarry, Megan Foster, Jo Salmon

JMIR mHealth and uHealth, Volume: 6, Issue: 4, Start page: e86

Swansea University Authors: Kelly Mackintosh, Melitta McNarry

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DOI (Published version): 10.2196/mhealth.9199

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Background: Wearable activity trackers have the potential to be integrated into physical activity interventions, yet little is known about how adolescents use these devices or perceive their acceptability.Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the usability and acceptability of a wearable a...

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Published in: JMIR mHealth and uHealth
ISSN: 2291-5222
Published: 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa40683
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2018-09-04T10:01:26.4022815</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>40683</id><entry>2018-06-08</entry><title>Wearable Activity Tracker Use Among Australian Adolescents: Usability and Acceptability Study</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-0355-6357</ORCID><firstname>Kelly</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><name>Kelly Mackintosh</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-0813-7477</ORCID><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><name>Melitta McNarry</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2018-06-08</date><deptcode>STSC</deptcode><abstract>Background: Wearable activity trackers have the potential to be integrated into physical activity interventions, yet little is known about how adolescents use these devices or perceive their acceptability.Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the usability and acceptability of a wearable activity tracker among adolescents. A secondary aim was to determine adolescents&#x2019; awareness and use of the different functions and features in the wearable activity tracker and accompanying app.Methods: Sixty adolescents (aged 13-14 years) in year 8 from 3 secondary schools in Melbourne, Australia, were provided with a wrist-worn Fitbit Flex and accompanying app, and were asked to use it for 6 weeks. Demographic data (age, sex) were collected via a Web-based survey completed during week 1 of the study. At the conclusion of the 6-week period, all adolescents participated in focus groups that explored their perceptions of the usability and acceptability of the Fitbit Flex, accompanying app, and Web-based Fitbit profile. Qualitative data were analyzed using pen profiles, which were constructed from verbatim transcripts.Results: Adolescents typically found the Fitbit Flex easy to use for activity tracking, though greater difficulties were reported for monitoring sleep. The Fitbit Flex was perceived to be useful for tracking daily activities, and adolescents used a range of features and functions available through the device and the app. Barriers to use included the comfort and design of the Fitbit Flex, a lack of specific feedback about activity levels, and the inability to wear the wearable activity tracker for water-based sports.Conclusions: Adolescents reported that the Fitbit Flex was easy to use and that it was a useful tool for tracking daily activities. A number of functions and features were used, including the device&#x2019;s visual display to track and self-monitor activity, goal-setting in the accompanying app, and undertaking challenges against friends. However, several barriers to use were identified, which may impact on sustained use over time. Overall, wearable activity trackers have the potential to be integrated into physical activity interventions targeted at adolescents, but both the functionality and wearability of the monitor should be considered.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>JMIR mHealth and uHealth</journal><volume>6</volume><journalNumber>4</journalNumber><paginationStart>e86</paginationStart><publisher/><issnElectronic>2291-5222</issnElectronic><keywords/><publishedDay>11</publishedDay><publishedMonth>4</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2018</publishedYear><publishedDate>2018-04-11</publishedDate><doi>10.2196/mhealth.9199</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Sport and Exercise Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>STSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2018-09-04T10:01:26.4022815</lastEdited><Created>2018-06-08T13:47:10.5905639</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Sports Science</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Nicola D</firstname><surname>Ridgers</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Anna</firstname><surname>Timperio</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Helen</firstname><surname>Brown</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Kylie</firstname><surname>Ball</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Susie</firstname><surname>Macfarlane</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Samuel K</firstname><surname>Lai</surname><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Kara</firstname><surname>Richards</surname><order>7</order></author><author><firstname>Kelly</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0355-6357</orcid><order>8</order></author><author><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0813-7477</orcid><order>9</order></author><author><firstname>Megan</firstname><surname>Foster</surname><order>10</order></author><author><firstname>Jo</firstname><surname>Salmon</surname><order>11</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0040683-08062018135210.pdf</filename><originalFilename>ridgers2018(2).pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2018-06-08T13:52:10.1600000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>1044290</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><embargoDate>2018-06-08T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2018-09-04T10:01:26.4022815 v2 40683 2018-06-08 Wearable Activity Tracker Use Among Australian Adolescents: Usability and Acceptability Study bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214 0000-0003-0355-6357 Kelly Mackintosh Kelly Mackintosh true false 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false 2018-06-08 STSC Background: Wearable activity trackers have the potential to be integrated into physical activity interventions, yet little is known about how adolescents use these devices or perceive their acceptability.Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the usability and acceptability of a wearable activity tracker among adolescents. A secondary aim was to determine adolescents’ awareness and use of the different functions and features in the wearable activity tracker and accompanying app.Methods: Sixty adolescents (aged 13-14 years) in year 8 from 3 secondary schools in Melbourne, Australia, were provided with a wrist-worn Fitbit Flex and accompanying app, and were asked to use it for 6 weeks. Demographic data (age, sex) were collected via a Web-based survey completed during week 1 of the study. At the conclusion of the 6-week period, all adolescents participated in focus groups that explored their perceptions of the usability and acceptability of the Fitbit Flex, accompanying app, and Web-based Fitbit profile. Qualitative data were analyzed using pen profiles, which were constructed from verbatim transcripts.Results: Adolescents typically found the Fitbit Flex easy to use for activity tracking, though greater difficulties were reported for monitoring sleep. The Fitbit Flex was perceived to be useful for tracking daily activities, and adolescents used a range of features and functions available through the device and the app. Barriers to use included the comfort and design of the Fitbit Flex, a lack of specific feedback about activity levels, and the inability to wear the wearable activity tracker for water-based sports.Conclusions: Adolescents reported that the Fitbit Flex was easy to use and that it was a useful tool for tracking daily activities. A number of functions and features were used, including the device’s visual display to track and self-monitor activity, goal-setting in the accompanying app, and undertaking challenges against friends. However, several barriers to use were identified, which may impact on sustained use over time. Overall, wearable activity trackers have the potential to be integrated into physical activity interventions targeted at adolescents, but both the functionality and wearability of the monitor should be considered. Journal Article JMIR mHealth and uHealth 6 4 e86 2291-5222 11 4 2018 2018-04-11 10.2196/mhealth.9199 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2018-09-04T10:01:26.4022815 2018-06-08T13:47:10.5905639 College of Engineering Sports Science Nicola D Ridgers 1 Anna Timperio 2 Helen Brown 3 Kylie Ball 4 Susie Macfarlane 5 Samuel K Lai 6 Kara Richards 7 Kelly Mackintosh 0000-0003-0355-6357 8 Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 9 Megan Foster 10 Jo Salmon 11 0040683-08062018135210.pdf ridgers2018(2).pdf 2018-06-08T13:52:10.1600000 Output 1044290 application/pdf Version of Record true 2018-06-08T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Wearable Activity Tracker Use Among Australian Adolescents: Usability and Acceptability Study
spellingShingle Wearable Activity Tracker Use Among Australian Adolescents: Usability and Acceptability Study
Kelly, Mackintosh
Melitta, McNarry
title_short Wearable Activity Tracker Use Among Australian Adolescents: Usability and Acceptability Study
title_full Wearable Activity Tracker Use Among Australian Adolescents: Usability and Acceptability Study
title_fullStr Wearable Activity Tracker Use Among Australian Adolescents: Usability and Acceptability Study
title_full_unstemmed Wearable Activity Tracker Use Among Australian Adolescents: Usability and Acceptability Study
title_sort Wearable Activity Tracker Use Among Australian Adolescents: Usability and Acceptability Study
author_id_str_mv bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214
062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398
author_id_fullname_str_mv bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214_***_Kelly, Mackintosh
062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta, McNarry
author Kelly, Mackintosh
Melitta, McNarry
author2 Nicola D Ridgers
Anna Timperio
Helen Brown
Kylie Ball
Susie Macfarlane
Samuel K Lai
Kara Richards
Kelly Mackintosh
Melitta McNarry
Megan Foster
Jo Salmon
format Journal article
container_title JMIR mHealth and uHealth
container_volume 6
container_issue 4
container_start_page e86
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 2291-5222
doi_str_mv 10.2196/mhealth.9199
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
document_store_str 1
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description Background: Wearable activity trackers have the potential to be integrated into physical activity interventions, yet little is known about how adolescents use these devices or perceive their acceptability.Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the usability and acceptability of a wearable activity tracker among adolescents. A secondary aim was to determine adolescents’ awareness and use of the different functions and features in the wearable activity tracker and accompanying app.Methods: Sixty adolescents (aged 13-14 years) in year 8 from 3 secondary schools in Melbourne, Australia, were provided with a wrist-worn Fitbit Flex and accompanying app, and were asked to use it for 6 weeks. Demographic data (age, sex) were collected via a Web-based survey completed during week 1 of the study. At the conclusion of the 6-week period, all adolescents participated in focus groups that explored their perceptions of the usability and acceptability of the Fitbit Flex, accompanying app, and Web-based Fitbit profile. Qualitative data were analyzed using pen profiles, which were constructed from verbatim transcripts.Results: Adolescents typically found the Fitbit Flex easy to use for activity tracking, though greater difficulties were reported for monitoring sleep. The Fitbit Flex was perceived to be useful for tracking daily activities, and adolescents used a range of features and functions available through the device and the app. Barriers to use included the comfort and design of the Fitbit Flex, a lack of specific feedback about activity levels, and the inability to wear the wearable activity tracker for water-based sports.Conclusions: Adolescents reported that the Fitbit Flex was easy to use and that it was a useful tool for tracking daily activities. A number of functions and features were used, including the device’s visual display to track and self-monitor activity, goal-setting in the accompanying app, and undertaking challenges against friends. However, several barriers to use were identified, which may impact on sustained use over time. Overall, wearable activity trackers have the potential to be integrated into physical activity interventions targeted at adolescents, but both the functionality and wearability of the monitor should be considered.
published_date 2018-04-11T04:01:17Z
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