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Differences in step characteristics and linear kinematics between rugby players and sprinters during initial sprint acceleration

James J. Wild, Ian N. Bezodis, Jamie S. North, Neil Bezodis Orcid Logo

European Journal of Sport Science, Pages: 1 - 11

Swansea University Author: Neil Bezodis Orcid Logo

Abstract

The initial steps of a sprint are important in team sports, such as rugby, where there is an inherent requirement to maximally accelerate over short distances. Current understanding of sprint acceleration technique is primarily based on data from track and field sprinters, although whether this info...

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Published in: European Journal of Sport Science
ISSN: 1746-1391 1536-7290
Published: 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa40694
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first_indexed 2018-06-12T13:40:29Z
last_indexed 2018-09-04T12:54:51Z
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spelling 2018-09-04T10:41:35.1481275 v2 40694 2018-06-12 Differences in step characteristics and linear kinematics between rugby players and sprinters during initial sprint acceleration 534588568c1936e94e1ed8527b8c991b 0000-0003-2229-3310 Neil Bezodis Neil Bezodis true false 2018-06-12 STSC The initial steps of a sprint are important in team sports, such as rugby, where there is an inherent requirement to maximally accelerate over short distances. Current understanding of sprint acceleration technique is primarily based on data from track and field sprinters, although whether this information is transferable to athletes such as rugby players is unclear, due to differing ecological constraints. Sagittal plane video data were collected (240 Hz) and manually digitised to calculate the kinematics of professional rugby forwards (n = 15) and backs (n = 15), and sprinters (n = 18; 100 m personal best range = 9.96–11.33 s) during the first three steps of three maximal sprint accelerations. Using a between-group research design, differences between groups were determined using magnitude-based inferences, and within-group relationships between technique variables and initial sprint acceleration performance were established using correlation. Substantial between-group differences were observed in multiple variables. Only one variable, toe-off distance, differed between groups (d = −0.42 to −2.62) and also demonstrated meaningful relationships with sprint performance within all three groups (r = −0.44 to −0.58), whereby a stance foot position more posterior relative to the centre of mass at toe-off was associated with better sprint performance. While toe-off distance appears to be an important technical feature for sprint acceleration performance in both sprinters and rugby players, caution should be applied to the direct transfer of other kinematic information from sprinters to inform the technical development of acceleration in team sports athletes. Journal Article European Journal of Sport Science 1 11 1746-1391 1536-7290 Biomechanics, constraints, rugby union, sprinting, technique 31 12 2018 2018-12-31 10.1080/17461391.2018.1490459 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2018-09-04T10:41:35.1481275 2018-06-12T09:29:49.9019060 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences James J. Wild 1 Ian N. Bezodis 2 Jamie S. North 3 Neil Bezodis 0000-0003-2229-3310 4 0040694-12062018135404.pdf wild2018.pdf 2018-06-12T13:54:04.0170000 Output 485809 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2019-07-11T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Differences in step characteristics and linear kinematics between rugby players and sprinters during initial sprint acceleration
spellingShingle Differences in step characteristics and linear kinematics between rugby players and sprinters during initial sprint acceleration
Neil Bezodis
title_short Differences in step characteristics and linear kinematics between rugby players and sprinters during initial sprint acceleration
title_full Differences in step characteristics and linear kinematics between rugby players and sprinters during initial sprint acceleration
title_fullStr Differences in step characteristics and linear kinematics between rugby players and sprinters during initial sprint acceleration
title_full_unstemmed Differences in step characteristics and linear kinematics between rugby players and sprinters during initial sprint acceleration
title_sort Differences in step characteristics and linear kinematics between rugby players and sprinters during initial sprint acceleration
author_id_str_mv 534588568c1936e94e1ed8527b8c991b
author_id_fullname_str_mv 534588568c1936e94e1ed8527b8c991b_***_Neil Bezodis
author Neil Bezodis
author2 James J. Wild
Ian N. Bezodis
Jamie S. North
Neil Bezodis
format Journal article
container_title European Journal of Sport Science
container_start_page 1
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 1746-1391
1536-7290
doi_str_mv 10.1080/17461391.2018.1490459
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description The initial steps of a sprint are important in team sports, such as rugby, where there is an inherent requirement to maximally accelerate over short distances. Current understanding of sprint acceleration technique is primarily based on data from track and field sprinters, although whether this information is transferable to athletes such as rugby players is unclear, due to differing ecological constraints. Sagittal plane video data were collected (240 Hz) and manually digitised to calculate the kinematics of professional rugby forwards (n = 15) and backs (n = 15), and sprinters (n = 18; 100 m personal best range = 9.96–11.33 s) during the first three steps of three maximal sprint accelerations. Using a between-group research design, differences between groups were determined using magnitude-based inferences, and within-group relationships between technique variables and initial sprint acceleration performance were established using correlation. Substantial between-group differences were observed in multiple variables. Only one variable, toe-off distance, differed between groups (d = −0.42 to −2.62) and also demonstrated meaningful relationships with sprint performance within all three groups (r = −0.44 to −0.58), whereby a stance foot position more posterior relative to the centre of mass at toe-off was associated with better sprint performance. While toe-off distance appears to be an important technical feature for sprint acceleration performance in both sprinters and rugby players, caution should be applied to the direct transfer of other kinematic information from sprinters to inform the technical development of acceleration in team sports athletes.
published_date 2018-12-31T03:51:48Z
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