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A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum for the symptoms of depression / Amy, Romijn

Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Volume: 51, Issue: 8, Pages: 810 - 821

Swansea University Author: Amy, Romijn

Abstract

Objectives: This trial investigated whether probiotics improved mood, stress and anxiety in a sample selected for low mood. We also tested whether the presence or severity of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and other blood...

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Published in: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
ISSN: 0004-8674 1440-1614
Published: 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa40734
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2018-08-09T15:07:26.7367525</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>40734</id><entry>2018-06-18</entry><title>A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum for the symptoms of depression</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>e360b00b12b720c52e38c94a539e6555</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-5014-1539</ORCID><firstname>Amy</firstname><surname>Romijn</surname><name>Amy Romijn</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2018-06-18</date><deptcode>HPS</deptcode><abstract>Objectives: This trial investigated whether probiotics improved mood, stress and anxiety in a sample selected for low mood. We also tested whether the presence or severity of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and other blood markers, would predict or impact treatment response. Method: Seventy-nine participants (10 dropouts) not currently taking psychotropic medications with at least moderate scores on self-report mood measures were randomly allocated to receive either a probiotic preparation (containing Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum) or a matched placebo, in a double-blind trial for 8 weeks. Data were analysed as intent-to-treat. Results: No significant difference was found between the probiotic and placebo groups on any psychological outcome measure (Cohen's d range = 0.07-0.16) or any blood-based biomarker. At end-point, 9 (23%) of those in the probiotic group showed a &#x2A7E;60% change on the Montgomery-&#xC5;sberg Depression Rating Scale (responders), compared to 10 (26%) of those in the placebo group ([Formula: see text], p = ns). Baseline vitamin D level was found to moderate treatment effect on several outcome measures. Dry mouth and sleep disruption were reported more frequently in the placebo group. Conclusions: This study found no evidence that the probiotic formulation is effective in treating low mood, or in moderating the levels of inflammatory and other biomarkers. The lack of observed effect on mood symptoms may be due to the severity, chronicity or treatment resistance of the sample; recruiting an antidepressant-naive sample experiencing mild, acute symptoms of low mood, may well yield a different result. Future studies taking a preventative approach or using probiotics as an adjuvant treatment may also be more effective. Vitamin D levels should be monitored in future studies in the area. The results of this trial are preliminary; future studies in the area should not be discouraged.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Australian &amp; New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry</journal><volume>51</volume><journalNumber>8</journalNumber><paginationStart>810</paginationStart><paginationEnd>821</paginationEnd><publisher/><issnPrint>0004-8674</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1440-1614</issnElectronic><keywords>Gut microbiome; depression; probiotics; vitamin D; inflammation</keywords><publishedDay>1</publishedDay><publishedMonth>8</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2017</publishedYear><publishedDate>2017-08-01</publishedDate><doi>10.1177/0004867416686694</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Psychology</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>HPS</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><lastEdited>2018-08-09T15:07:26.7367525</lastEdited><Created>2018-06-18T12:08:39.3166096</Created><path><level id="1">College of Human and Health Sciences</level><level id="2">Psychology</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Amy</firstname><surname>Romijn</surname><orcid>0000-0001-5014-1539</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Julia J</firstname><surname>Rucklidge</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Roeline G</firstname><surname>Kuijer</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Chris</firstname><surname>Frampton</surname><order>4</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0040734-05072018131108.pdf</filename><originalFilename>40734.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2018-07-05T13:11:08.1370000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>319708</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><embargoDate>2018-07-05T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><documentNotes>This Open Access article is distributed under CC BY-NC.</documentNotes><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents></rfc1807>
spelling 2018-08-09T15:07:26.7367525 v2 40734 2018-06-18 A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum for the symptoms of depression e360b00b12b720c52e38c94a539e6555 0000-0001-5014-1539 Amy Romijn Amy Romijn true false 2018-06-18 HPS Objectives: This trial investigated whether probiotics improved mood, stress and anxiety in a sample selected for low mood. We also tested whether the presence or severity of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and other blood markers, would predict or impact treatment response. Method: Seventy-nine participants (10 dropouts) not currently taking psychotropic medications with at least moderate scores on self-report mood measures were randomly allocated to receive either a probiotic preparation (containing Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum) or a matched placebo, in a double-blind trial for 8 weeks. Data were analysed as intent-to-treat. Results: No significant difference was found between the probiotic and placebo groups on any psychological outcome measure (Cohen's d range = 0.07-0.16) or any blood-based biomarker. At end-point, 9 (23%) of those in the probiotic group showed a ⩾60% change on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (responders), compared to 10 (26%) of those in the placebo group ([Formula: see text], p = ns). Baseline vitamin D level was found to moderate treatment effect on several outcome measures. Dry mouth and sleep disruption were reported more frequently in the placebo group. Conclusions: This study found no evidence that the probiotic formulation is effective in treating low mood, or in moderating the levels of inflammatory and other biomarkers. The lack of observed effect on mood symptoms may be due to the severity, chronicity or treatment resistance of the sample; recruiting an antidepressant-naive sample experiencing mild, acute symptoms of low mood, may well yield a different result. Future studies taking a preventative approach or using probiotics as an adjuvant treatment may also be more effective. Vitamin D levels should be monitored in future studies in the area. The results of this trial are preliminary; future studies in the area should not be discouraged. Journal Article Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 51 8 810 821 0004-8674 1440-1614 Gut microbiome; depression; probiotics; vitamin D; inflammation 1 8 2017 2017-08-01 10.1177/0004867416686694 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University 2018-08-09T15:07:26.7367525 2018-06-18T12:08:39.3166096 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Amy Romijn 0000-0001-5014-1539 1 Julia J Rucklidge 2 Roeline G Kuijer 3 Chris Frampton 4 0040734-05072018131108.pdf 40734.pdf 2018-07-05T13:11:08.1370000 Output 319708 application/pdf Version of Record true 2018-07-05T00:00:00.0000000 This Open Access article is distributed under CC BY-NC. true eng
title A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum for the symptoms of depression
spellingShingle A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum for the symptoms of depression
Amy, Romijn
title_short A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum for the symptoms of depression
title_full A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum for the symptoms of depression
title_fullStr A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum for the symptoms of depression
title_full_unstemmed A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum for the symptoms of depression
title_sort A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum for the symptoms of depression
author_id_str_mv e360b00b12b720c52e38c94a539e6555
author_id_fullname_str_mv e360b00b12b720c52e38c94a539e6555_***_Amy, Romijn
author Amy, Romijn
format Journal article
container_title Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
container_volume 51
container_issue 8
container_start_page 810
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
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1440-1614
doi_str_mv 10.1177/0004867416686694
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
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description Objectives: This trial investigated whether probiotics improved mood, stress and anxiety in a sample selected for low mood. We also tested whether the presence or severity of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and other blood markers, would predict or impact treatment response. Method: Seventy-nine participants (10 dropouts) not currently taking psychotropic medications with at least moderate scores on self-report mood measures were randomly allocated to receive either a probiotic preparation (containing Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum) or a matched placebo, in a double-blind trial for 8 weeks. Data were analysed as intent-to-treat. Results: No significant difference was found between the probiotic and placebo groups on any psychological outcome measure (Cohen's d range = 0.07-0.16) or any blood-based biomarker. At end-point, 9 (23%) of those in the probiotic group showed a ⩾60% change on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (responders), compared to 10 (26%) of those in the placebo group ([Formula: see text], p = ns). Baseline vitamin D level was found to moderate treatment effect on several outcome measures. Dry mouth and sleep disruption were reported more frequently in the placebo group. Conclusions: This study found no evidence that the probiotic formulation is effective in treating low mood, or in moderating the levels of inflammatory and other biomarkers. The lack of observed effect on mood symptoms may be due to the severity, chronicity or treatment resistance of the sample; recruiting an antidepressant-naive sample experiencing mild, acute symptoms of low mood, may well yield a different result. Future studies taking a preventative approach or using probiotics as an adjuvant treatment may also be more effective. Vitamin D levels should be monitored in future studies in the area. The results of this trial are preliminary; future studies in the area should not be discouraged.
published_date 2017-08-01T13:03:09Z
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