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Essays on job satisfaction in Great Britain. / Richard John Jones

Swansea University Author: Richard John, Jones

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In this thesis, I present three studies that add to the literature on job satisfaction in Great Britain. In the first study, I use data from the British 2004 Workplace Employee Relations Survey (WERS) to examine the relationship between job related training and job satisfaction. I use a random effec...

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Published: 2011
Institution: Swansea University
Degree level: Doctoral
Degree name: Ph.D
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa42482
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spelling 2018-08-02T16:24:29.4001876 v2 42482 2018-08-02 Essays on job satisfaction in Great Britain. 228c661c79715028c88acfdf1c326fe8 NULL Richard John Jones Richard John Jones true true 2018-08-02 In this thesis, I present three studies that add to the literature on job satisfaction in Great Britain. In the first study, I use data from the British 2004 Workplace Employee Relations Survey (WERS) to examine the relationship between job related training and job satisfaction. I use a random effects ordinal regression model that exploits the matching of workplace information to employee information to control for unobserved heterogeneity at the workplace level. Using this technique, I find clear evidence that job related training is positively associated with all the dimensions of job satisfaction considered. I also find evidence that that the impact of training on workers' satisfaction varies for different groups of workers and depends on the amount of training individuals have relative to colleagues in the same workplace In the second study, I also make use of the 2004 WERS data, including the new financial performance questionnaire, to examine the relationship between job satisfaction and workplace performance. I find that average job satisfaction is positively associated with subjective assessments of financial performance and labour productivity and that these associations are statistically significant at conventional test levels. I find that measures of job satisfaction are negatively related to rates of absenteeism and voluntary employee turnover. I also find that job satisfaction is positively related to gross value added per full-time equivalent employee but this association is not statistically significant when measures of absenteeism and voluntary employee turnover are included in the model as explanatory variables. Finally, I find no statistically significant relationship between measures of satisfaction and profitability. In the third study, I use the first six waves of the Welsh boosts to the British Household Panel Survey to explain the determinants of overall job satisfaction and four facets of job satisfaction in Wales. My results show that low-paid workers in Wales do not report lower job satisfaction than their higher paid counterparts. Moreover, I find that despite there being disproportionately more low-paid workers in Wales than in either England or Scotland, job satisfaction is higher in Wales than in the other countries. E-Thesis Occupational psychology.;Organizational behavior. 31 12 2011 2011-12-31 COLLEGE NANME Economics COLLEGE CODE Swansea University Doctoral Ph.D 2018-08-02T16:24:29.4001876 2018-08-02T16:24:29.4001876 School of Management Economics Richard John Jones NULL 1 0042482-02082018162457.pdf 10801712.pdf 2018-08-02T16:24:57.9800000 Output 9343015 application/pdf E-Thesis true 2018-08-02T16:24:57.9800000 false
title Essays on job satisfaction in Great Britain.
spellingShingle Essays on job satisfaction in Great Britain.
Richard John, Jones
title_short Essays on job satisfaction in Great Britain.
title_full Essays on job satisfaction in Great Britain.
title_fullStr Essays on job satisfaction in Great Britain.
title_full_unstemmed Essays on job satisfaction in Great Britain.
title_sort Essays on job satisfaction in Great Britain.
author_id_str_mv 228c661c79715028c88acfdf1c326fe8
author_id_fullname_str_mv 228c661c79715028c88acfdf1c326fe8_***_Richard John, Jones
author Richard John, Jones
author2 Richard John Jones
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department_str Economics{{{_:::_}}}School of Management{{{_:::_}}}Economics
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description In this thesis, I present three studies that add to the literature on job satisfaction in Great Britain. In the first study, I use data from the British 2004 Workplace Employee Relations Survey (WERS) to examine the relationship between job related training and job satisfaction. I use a random effects ordinal regression model that exploits the matching of workplace information to employee information to control for unobserved heterogeneity at the workplace level. Using this technique, I find clear evidence that job related training is positively associated with all the dimensions of job satisfaction considered. I also find evidence that that the impact of training on workers' satisfaction varies for different groups of workers and depends on the amount of training individuals have relative to colleagues in the same workplace In the second study, I also make use of the 2004 WERS data, including the new financial performance questionnaire, to examine the relationship between job satisfaction and workplace performance. I find that average job satisfaction is positively associated with subjective assessments of financial performance and labour productivity and that these associations are statistically significant at conventional test levels. I find that measures of job satisfaction are negatively related to rates of absenteeism and voluntary employee turnover. I also find that job satisfaction is positively related to gross value added per full-time equivalent employee but this association is not statistically significant when measures of absenteeism and voluntary employee turnover are included in the model as explanatory variables. Finally, I find no statistically significant relationship between measures of satisfaction and profitability. In the third study, I use the first six waves of the Welsh boosts to the British Household Panel Survey to explain the determinants of overall job satisfaction and four facets of job satisfaction in Wales. My results show that low-paid workers in Wales do not report lower job satisfaction than their higher paid counterparts. Moreover, I find that despite there being disproportionately more low-paid workers in Wales than in either England or Scotland, job satisfaction is higher in Wales than in the other countries.
published_date 2011-12-31T03:59:42Z
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score 10.84395