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Do socio-demographic and psychological factors predict dietary pattern? / Julie E Griffiths

Swansea University Author: Julie E, Griffiths

Abstract

Despite governmental strategies to curb chronic disease, obesity and mental health problems, these continue largely unabated. Yet interventions and health education are expensive and would be more cost effective if targeted at high risk groups. The purpose of the thesis was to establish predictors o...

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Published: 2010
Institution: Swansea University
Degree level: Master of Philosophy
Degree name: M.Phil
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa42529
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last_indexed 2019-10-21T16:47:59Z
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spelling 2018-08-16T14:39:02.9105634 v2 42529 2018-08-02 Do socio-demographic and psychological factors predict dietary pattern? f385620052a118757972d08a186f09b6 NULL Julie E Griffiths Julie E Griffiths true true 2018-08-02 Despite governmental strategies to curb chronic disease, obesity and mental health problems, these continue largely unabated. Yet interventions and health education are expensive and would be more cost effective if targeted at high risk groups. The purpose of the thesis was to establish predictors of healthy and unhealthy dietary patterns and thus identify sections of the population to which more effective interventions can be focused. The 'Western' diet has been characterized by higher consumption of refined cereals, processed and red meats, eggs, desserts and high-fat dairy products while the 'Prudent' diet is distinguished by more fruit, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, fish and poultry. The 'Western' diet has been linked with higher incidence of chronic disease. A food frequency questionnaire of a representative sample of the adult U.K. population was reduced using factor analysis to ten dietary patterns, seven of which were consistent with either the Western or Prudent type diet. These dietary styles were related to demographic variables and found to differ depending on gender, education, age and socio-economic background. The present study is unusual in that it considered the influence of a wide range of factors on dietary choice. Women ate more whole-foods while men ate more processed foods; older people preferred sweet foods; the lesser educated ate more savoury foods; the better educated ate more rice, pasta nuts, fruits and salad; higher socio-economic status was associated with eating more whole foods. In particular it was recommended that nutrition education should be targeted at more extraverted young males with less education, from a lower socio-economic background. A more general message is that one should not consider demographic variables in isolation as there are interactions that make simple generalizations misleading. E-Thesis Clinical psychology. 31 12 2010 2010-12-31 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE Swansea University Master of Philosophy M.Phil 2018-08-16T14:39:02.9105634 2018-08-02T16:24:29.5717948 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Julie E Griffiths NULL 1 0042529-02082018162501.pdf 10805278.pdf 2018-08-02T16:25:01.6770000 Output 4396026 application/pdf E-Thesis true 2018-08-02T16:25:01.6770000 false
title Do socio-demographic and psychological factors predict dietary pattern?
spellingShingle Do socio-demographic and psychological factors predict dietary pattern?
Julie E, Griffiths
title_short Do socio-demographic and psychological factors predict dietary pattern?
title_full Do socio-demographic and psychological factors predict dietary pattern?
title_fullStr Do socio-demographic and psychological factors predict dietary pattern?
title_full_unstemmed Do socio-demographic and psychological factors predict dietary pattern?
title_sort Do socio-demographic and psychological factors predict dietary pattern?
author_id_str_mv f385620052a118757972d08a186f09b6
author_id_fullname_str_mv f385620052a118757972d08a186f09b6_***_Julie E, Griffiths
author Julie E, Griffiths
author2 Julie E Griffiths
format E-Thesis
publishDate 2010
institution Swansea University
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Despite governmental strategies to curb chronic disease, obesity and mental health problems, these continue largely unabated. Yet interventions and health education are expensive and would be more cost effective if targeted at high risk groups. The purpose of the thesis was to establish predictors of healthy and unhealthy dietary patterns and thus identify sections of the population to which more effective interventions can be focused. The 'Western' diet has been characterized by higher consumption of refined cereals, processed and red meats, eggs, desserts and high-fat dairy products while the 'Prudent' diet is distinguished by more fruit, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, fish and poultry. The 'Western' diet has been linked with higher incidence of chronic disease. A food frequency questionnaire of a representative sample of the adult U.K. population was reduced using factor analysis to ten dietary patterns, seven of which were consistent with either the Western or Prudent type diet. These dietary styles were related to demographic variables and found to differ depending on gender, education, age and socio-economic background. The present study is unusual in that it considered the influence of a wide range of factors on dietary choice. Women ate more whole-foods while men ate more processed foods; older people preferred sweet foods; the lesser educated ate more savoury foods; the better educated ate more rice, pasta nuts, fruits and salad; higher socio-economic status was associated with eating more whole foods. In particular it was recommended that nutrition education should be targeted at more extraverted young males with less education, from a lower socio-economic background. A more general message is that one should not consider demographic variables in isolation as there are interactions that make simple generalizations misleading.
published_date 2010-12-31T03:57:57Z
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score 10.845434