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Alcoholism - there and back: A qualitiative analysis of interviews with clients engaging with a 12 Step based treatment prgramme. / Rebecca Louise Hancock

Swansea University Author: Rebecca Louise Hancock

Abstract

The contribution of treatment interventions and processes involved in facilitating recovery from addiction are still not entirely clear. In particular, 12 Step research data is notoriously difficult to obtain due to the anonymity of group members and self-selecting nature of the organisation. The pr...

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Published: 2007
Institution: Swansea University
Degree level: Master of Philosophy
Degree name: M.Phil
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa42688
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spelling 2018-08-31T15:40:37.5497247 v2 42688 2018-08-02 Alcoholism - there and back: A qualitiative analysis of interviews with clients engaging with a 12 Step based treatment prgramme. 8c98d4397d931ab7c47321b9b61d6ccd NULL Rebecca Louise Hancock Rebecca Louise Hancock true true 2018-08-02 The contribution of treatment interventions and processes involved in facilitating recovery from addiction are still not entirely clear. In particular, 12 Step research data is notoriously difficult to obtain due to the anonymity of group members and self-selecting nature of the organisation. The present study investigates the processes of recovery from addiction, via a Grounded Theory analysis of semi-structured interviews with fourteen participants, recruited from a 12 Step based treatment programme. Six major phases, or in Grounded Theory terms categories, emerged from the analysis. In chronological order, these are: the descent into addiction; realisation of the problem [a gradual process]; accessing treatment; the treatment process; spirituality; and recovery. It is suggested that the participants experienced a gradual descent into addiction. As the participants' drinking career developed further, cracks began to show and the telltale signs that appeared indicated a problem with alcohol. Participants appear to have journeyed through a gradual process of realisation of the problem. All participants described a turning point or significant event that prompted them to access treatment. The spiritual nature of the 12 Step programme was self-evident from the data. Finally, participants viewed their recovery as a life-long process, and although they acknowledged that the programme provided them with the tools to achieve and maintain sobriety; they recognised that it was ultimately their responsibility to put these tools into action. In light of the limited qualitative research on the subject, this study has provided a valuable insight into the processes of recovery via a 12 Step based treatment programme. Working through these process is important for sustaining abstinence and recovery. However, if we are to improve alcohol treatment and rehabilitation services and thus reduce the impact that alcohol use has on the individual's life plus their families/friends, and communities, we need to carry out such research on a larger scale. E-Thesis Clinical psychology. 31 12 2007 2007-12-31 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE Swansea University Master of Philosophy M.Phil 2018-08-31T15:40:37.5497247 2018-08-02T16:24:30.1178000 Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences School of Psychology Rebecca Louise Hancock NULL 1 0042688-02082018162514.pdf 10807457.pdf 2018-08-02T16:25:14.1400000 Output 3357089 application/pdf E-Thesis true 2018-08-02T16:25:14.1570000 false
title Alcoholism - there and back: A qualitiative analysis of interviews with clients engaging with a 12 Step based treatment prgramme.
spellingShingle Alcoholism - there and back: A qualitiative analysis of interviews with clients engaging with a 12 Step based treatment prgramme.
Rebecca Louise Hancock
title_short Alcoholism - there and back: A qualitiative analysis of interviews with clients engaging with a 12 Step based treatment prgramme.
title_full Alcoholism - there and back: A qualitiative analysis of interviews with clients engaging with a 12 Step based treatment prgramme.
title_fullStr Alcoholism - there and back: A qualitiative analysis of interviews with clients engaging with a 12 Step based treatment prgramme.
title_full_unstemmed Alcoholism - there and back: A qualitiative analysis of interviews with clients engaging with a 12 Step based treatment prgramme.
title_sort Alcoholism - there and back: A qualitiative analysis of interviews with clients engaging with a 12 Step based treatment prgramme.
author_id_str_mv 8c98d4397d931ab7c47321b9b61d6ccd
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8c98d4397d931ab7c47321b9b61d6ccd_***_Rebecca Louise Hancock
author Rebecca Louise Hancock
author2 Rebecca Louise Hancock
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publishDate 2007
institution Swansea University
college_str Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
department_str School of Psychology{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences{{{_:::_}}}School of Psychology
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description The contribution of treatment interventions and processes involved in facilitating recovery from addiction are still not entirely clear. In particular, 12 Step research data is notoriously difficult to obtain due to the anonymity of group members and self-selecting nature of the organisation. The present study investigates the processes of recovery from addiction, via a Grounded Theory analysis of semi-structured interviews with fourteen participants, recruited from a 12 Step based treatment programme. Six major phases, or in Grounded Theory terms categories, emerged from the analysis. In chronological order, these are: the descent into addiction; realisation of the problem [a gradual process]; accessing treatment; the treatment process; spirituality; and recovery. It is suggested that the participants experienced a gradual descent into addiction. As the participants' drinking career developed further, cracks began to show and the telltale signs that appeared indicated a problem with alcohol. Participants appear to have journeyed through a gradual process of realisation of the problem. All participants described a turning point or significant event that prompted them to access treatment. The spiritual nature of the 12 Step programme was self-evident from the data. Finally, participants viewed their recovery as a life-long process, and although they acknowledged that the programme provided them with the tools to achieve and maintain sobriety; they recognised that it was ultimately their responsibility to put these tools into action. In light of the limited qualitative research on the subject, this study has provided a valuable insight into the processes of recovery via a 12 Step based treatment programme. Working through these process is important for sustaining abstinence and recovery. However, if we are to improve alcohol treatment and rehabilitation services and thus reduce the impact that alcohol use has on the individual's life plus their families/friends, and communities, we need to carry out such research on a larger scale.
published_date 2007-12-31T03:53:27Z
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