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Emergent slot machine gambling: A relational frame theory approach. / Alice Elizabeth Hoon

Swansea University Author: Alice Elizabeth Hoon

Abstract

It has been suggested that gambling behaviour may not be solely controlled by schedules of reinforcement, but may be under the control of verbal behaviour. Relational frame theory is a contemporary account of verbal behaviour which may be able to account for aspects of gambling behaviour that cannot...

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Published: 2012
Institution: Swansea University
Degree level: Doctoral
Degree name: Ph.D
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa42729
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spelling 2018-08-02T16:24:30.2581980 v2 42729 2018-08-02 Emergent slot machine gambling: A relational frame theory approach. 9bbf2b7af2c4ff584f0f883ea0135640 NULL Alice Elizabeth Hoon Alice Elizabeth Hoon true true 2018-08-02 It has been suggested that gambling behaviour may not be solely controlled by schedules of reinforcement, but may be under the control of verbal behaviour. Relational frame theory is a contemporary account of verbal behaviour which may be able to account for aspects of gambling behaviour that cannot be explained by a pure schedule of reinforcement account. Chapter 2 demonstrated that contextual cues may influence preferences for concurrently available slot-machines, thus overriding the contingencies of reinforcement in place. Chapter 3 demonstrated that the presence of accurate or inaccurate rules may influence slot-machine choice and affect gambling persistence. Participants that received inaccurate rules regarding the payout probability of a slot machine, gambled for longer than those given accurate rules. Chapter 4 reported that the discriminative functions of slot-machines could be transformed in accordance with derived same and opposite relations, such that participants showed preferences for slot-machines that had never been experienced before. Chapter 5 demonstrated that not only could preferences for concurrently available slot machines be transformed in accordance with derived comparative relations, but found that preferences for slot machines increased relative to the relational network that had been trained. In Chapter 6, ratings of wins, near-misses and losses on a computer simulated slot-machine could be altered in accordance with derived same and opposite relations, and could even override the non-arbitrary properties of a slot-machine. It was concluded that gambling is verbal behaviour and can be accounted for by derived relations and the transformation of function. These findings may explain instances of gambling behaviour which cannot be accounted for by the direct acting contingencies. E-Thesis Behavioral psychology. 31 12 2012 2012-12-31 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE Swansea University Doctoral Ph.D 2018-08-02T16:24:30.2581980 2018-08-02T16:24:30.2581980 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Alice Elizabeth Hoon NULL 1 0042729-02082018162517.pdf 10807498.pdf 2018-08-02T16:25:17.4030000 Output 16087347 application/pdf E-Thesis true 2018-08-02T16:25:17.4030000 false
title Emergent slot machine gambling: A relational frame theory approach.
spellingShingle Emergent slot machine gambling: A relational frame theory approach.
Alice Elizabeth Hoon
title_short Emergent slot machine gambling: A relational frame theory approach.
title_full Emergent slot machine gambling: A relational frame theory approach.
title_fullStr Emergent slot machine gambling: A relational frame theory approach.
title_full_unstemmed Emergent slot machine gambling: A relational frame theory approach.
title_sort Emergent slot machine gambling: A relational frame theory approach.
author_id_str_mv 9bbf2b7af2c4ff584f0f883ea0135640
author_id_fullname_str_mv 9bbf2b7af2c4ff584f0f883ea0135640_***_Alice Elizabeth Hoon
author Alice Elizabeth Hoon
author2 Alice Elizabeth Hoon
format E-Thesis
publishDate 2012
institution Swansea University
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
document_store_str 1
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description It has been suggested that gambling behaviour may not be solely controlled by schedules of reinforcement, but may be under the control of verbal behaviour. Relational frame theory is a contemporary account of verbal behaviour which may be able to account for aspects of gambling behaviour that cannot be explained by a pure schedule of reinforcement account. Chapter 2 demonstrated that contextual cues may influence preferences for concurrently available slot-machines, thus overriding the contingencies of reinforcement in place. Chapter 3 demonstrated that the presence of accurate or inaccurate rules may influence slot-machine choice and affect gambling persistence. Participants that received inaccurate rules regarding the payout probability of a slot machine, gambled for longer than those given accurate rules. Chapter 4 reported that the discriminative functions of slot-machines could be transformed in accordance with derived same and opposite relations, such that participants showed preferences for slot-machines that had never been experienced before. Chapter 5 demonstrated that not only could preferences for concurrently available slot machines be transformed in accordance with derived comparative relations, but found that preferences for slot machines increased relative to the relational network that had been trained. In Chapter 6, ratings of wins, near-misses and losses on a computer simulated slot-machine could be altered in accordance with derived same and opposite relations, and could even override the non-arbitrary properties of a slot-machine. It was concluded that gambling is verbal behaviour and can be accounted for by derived relations and the transformation of function. These findings may explain instances of gambling behaviour which cannot be accounted for by the direct acting contingencies.
published_date 2012-12-31T03:56:33Z
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