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Preventing intellectual disability: Ethical issues. / Pekka Louhiala

Swansea University Author: Pekka Louhiala

Abstract

The thesis opens with four cases that demonstrate various aspects of the prevention of intellectual disability (ID). The following four chapters introduce ID and many related issues (Chapter 2), the concept of geneticisation (Chapter 3), the epidemiology of ID (Chapter 4) and the concept of preventi...

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Published: 2002
Institution: Swansea University
Degree level: Doctoral
Degree name: Ph.D
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa42806
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first_indexed 2018-08-02T18:55:35Z
last_indexed 2019-10-21T16:48:29Z
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spelling 2018-08-17T11:05:04.2099238 v2 42806 2018-08-02 Preventing intellectual disability: Ethical issues. 024a62d98d202e2038e0de3116e64429 NULL Pekka Louhiala Pekka Louhiala true true 2018-08-02 The thesis opens with four cases that demonstrate various aspects of the prevention of intellectual disability (ID). The following four chapters introduce ID and many related issues (Chapter 2), the concept of geneticisation (Chapter 3), the epidemiology of ID (Chapter 4) and the concept of prevention (Chapter 5). In Chapter 6 prenatal diagnosis and screening are examined thoroughly. The two major models, the reproductive autonomy model and the public health model, are described and scrutinised. For example, the questions of informed consent, screening as a request of the women involved, reassurance, concept of risk, locus of control and eugenics are critically discussed. Chapter 7 deals with genetic counselling in general and directive versus non-directive counselling in particular. Chapter 8 asks the question 'Why should ID be prevented?' Five arguments are presented and critically examined: the eugenic argument, the foetal- wastage argument, the societal burden argument, the family burden argument and the quality of life argument. In Chapter 9 Mary Ann Warren's multi-criterial theory of moral status is presented and applied to potential or actual individuals with or without intellectual disability. More practical issues are raised again in Chapter 10, which deals with the prevention of ID with respect to three syndromes. The conclusive chapter (II) returns to the cases described in the beginning. E-Thesis Medical ethics.;Disability studies. 31 12 2002 2002-12-31 COLLEGE NANME Public Health and Policy Studies COLLEGE CODE Swansea University Doctoral Ph.D 2018-08-17T11:05:04.2099238 2018-08-02T16:24:30.5233962 Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences School of Health and Social Care - Public Health Pekka Louhiala NULL 1 0042806-02082018162523.pdf 10807582.pdf 2018-08-02T16:25:23.3600000 Output 6582226 application/pdf E-Thesis true 2018-08-02T16:25:23.3600000 false
title Preventing intellectual disability: Ethical issues.
spellingShingle Preventing intellectual disability: Ethical issues.
Pekka Louhiala
title_short Preventing intellectual disability: Ethical issues.
title_full Preventing intellectual disability: Ethical issues.
title_fullStr Preventing intellectual disability: Ethical issues.
title_full_unstemmed Preventing intellectual disability: Ethical issues.
title_sort Preventing intellectual disability: Ethical issues.
author_id_str_mv 024a62d98d202e2038e0de3116e64429
author_id_fullname_str_mv 024a62d98d202e2038e0de3116e64429_***_Pekka Louhiala
author Pekka Louhiala
author2 Pekka Louhiala
format E-Thesis
publishDate 2002
institution Swansea University
college_str Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
department_str School of Health and Social Care - Public Health{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences{{{_:::_}}}School of Health and Social Care - Public Health
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description The thesis opens with four cases that demonstrate various aspects of the prevention of intellectual disability (ID). The following four chapters introduce ID and many related issues (Chapter 2), the concept of geneticisation (Chapter 3), the epidemiology of ID (Chapter 4) and the concept of prevention (Chapter 5). In Chapter 6 prenatal diagnosis and screening are examined thoroughly. The two major models, the reproductive autonomy model and the public health model, are described and scrutinised. For example, the questions of informed consent, screening as a request of the women involved, reassurance, concept of risk, locus of control and eugenics are critically discussed. Chapter 7 deals with genetic counselling in general and directive versus non-directive counselling in particular. Chapter 8 asks the question 'Why should ID be prevented?' Five arguments are presented and critically examined: the eugenic argument, the foetal- wastage argument, the societal burden argument, the family burden argument and the quality of life argument. In Chapter 9 Mary Ann Warren's multi-criterial theory of moral status is presented and applied to potential or actual individuals with or without intellectual disability. More practical issues are raised again in Chapter 10, which deals with the prevention of ID with respect to three syndromes. The conclusive chapter (II) returns to the cases described in the beginning.
published_date 2002-12-31T03:51:30Z
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