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A tale of two universities: graduates perceived value of entrepreneurship education

Paul Jones Orcid Logo, David Pickernell, Rebecca Fisher, Celia Netana

Education + Training, Volume: 59, Issue: 7/8, Pages: 689 - 705

Swansea University Author: Paul Jones Orcid Logo

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate career impact of entrepreneurship education (EE) considering evidence drawn from a quantitative study of alumni within two UK higher education institutions (HEIs) from a retrospective perspective. The findings inform the value of the EE experience and its imp...

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Published in: Education + Training
ISSN: 0040-0912
Published: UK Emerald Publishing Ltd 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa43266
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spelling 2019-07-09T10:29:44.5895431 v2 43266 2018-08-13 A tale of two universities: graduates perceived value of entrepreneurship education 21e2660aaa102fe36fc981880dd9e082 0000-0003-0417-9143 Paul Jones Paul Jones true false 2018-08-13 BBU The purpose of this paper is to evaluate career impact of entrepreneurship education (EE) considering evidence drawn from a quantitative study of alumni within two UK higher education institutions (HEIs) from a retrospective perspective. The findings inform the value of the EE experience and its impact on both self-employability and wider employability career choices. This study will be of relevance to both enterprise support agencies and government policy makers. This research study considers evidence drawn from an online quantitative survey of EE within two UK HEIs. The survey evaluated a range of issues including course design, programme satisfaction, impact, career outcomes and respondents demographics. Over 80 respondents completed the survey in full which was analysed using a range of bivariate techniques. The evidence suggested here indicates that EE programmes provide value both in terms of helping to enable business start-ups and also in supporting other career paths, through the enterprising knowledge and skill sets graduates acquire during their specialised studies. This study contributes to the literature by recognising and measuring these contributions. For example, this study enables discernment between different EE course components and their value for different career outcomes. The study recognises the limitations of this survey data in terms of the size of the sample, number of HEIs evaluated and its point in time design. The HEI sector must evaluate its practices and measure the effectiveness of its graduates in terms of achieving sustainable business start-up. In course design, the evidence suggested that students value both the enterprising and entrepreneurial skills and knowledge components and discern value between them in their later careers. The findings suggest that EE graduates typically experience portfolio careers with multiple occupations in different sectors and roles within both employment and self-employment. Thus it is important that EE programme design includes both enterprising and entrepreneurial components to meet the future requirements of their graduates postgraduation. This study contributes new evidence regarding the value of EE in UK HEIs. This evidence should inform course design and policy makers regarding the value of EE in creating self-employment and creating enterprising employees. Journal Article Education + Training 59 7/8 689 705 Emerald Publishing Ltd UK 0040-0912 University, UK, Graduates, Enterprise, Entrepreneurship education, Self-employment 15 6 2017 2017-06-15 10.1108/ET-06-2017-0079 https://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/ET-06-2017-0079 COLLEGE NANME Business COLLEGE CODE BBU Swansea University 2019-07-09T10:29:44.5895431 2018-08-13T10:58:51.9468676 School of Management School of Management Paul Jones 0000-0003-0417-9143 1 David Pickernell 2 Rebecca Fisher 3 Celia Netana 4 0043266-21082018164015.pdf Jones_P_Education_and_Training_2017_post_print.pdf 2018-08-21T16:40:15.9670000 Output 386901 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2018-08-21T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title A tale of two universities: graduates perceived value of entrepreneurship education
spellingShingle A tale of two universities: graduates perceived value of entrepreneurship education
Paul Jones
title_short A tale of two universities: graduates perceived value of entrepreneurship education
title_full A tale of two universities: graduates perceived value of entrepreneurship education
title_fullStr A tale of two universities: graduates perceived value of entrepreneurship education
title_full_unstemmed A tale of two universities: graduates perceived value of entrepreneurship education
title_sort A tale of two universities: graduates perceived value of entrepreneurship education
author_id_str_mv 21e2660aaa102fe36fc981880dd9e082
author_id_fullname_str_mv 21e2660aaa102fe36fc981880dd9e082_***_Paul Jones
author Paul Jones
author2 Paul Jones
David Pickernell
Rebecca Fisher
Celia Netana
format Journal article
container_title Education + Training
container_volume 59
container_issue 7/8
container_start_page 689
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 0040-0912
doi_str_mv 10.1108/ET-06-2017-0079
publisher Emerald Publishing Ltd
college_str School of Management
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id schoolofmanagement
hierarchy_top_title School of Management
hierarchy_parent_id schoolofmanagement
hierarchy_parent_title School of Management
department_str School of Management{{{_:::_}}}School of Management{{{_:::_}}}School of Management
url https://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/ET-06-2017-0079
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description The purpose of this paper is to evaluate career impact of entrepreneurship education (EE) considering evidence drawn from a quantitative study of alumni within two UK higher education institutions (HEIs) from a retrospective perspective. The findings inform the value of the EE experience and its impact on both self-employability and wider employability career choices. This study will be of relevance to both enterprise support agencies and government policy makers. This research study considers evidence drawn from an online quantitative survey of EE within two UK HEIs. The survey evaluated a range of issues including course design, programme satisfaction, impact, career outcomes and respondents demographics. Over 80 respondents completed the survey in full which was analysed using a range of bivariate techniques. The evidence suggested here indicates that EE programmes provide value both in terms of helping to enable business start-ups and also in supporting other career paths, through the enterprising knowledge and skill sets graduates acquire during their specialised studies. This study contributes to the literature by recognising and measuring these contributions. For example, this study enables discernment between different EE course components and their value for different career outcomes. The study recognises the limitations of this survey data in terms of the size of the sample, number of HEIs evaluated and its point in time design. The HEI sector must evaluate its practices and measure the effectiveness of its graduates in terms of achieving sustainable business start-up. In course design, the evidence suggested that students value both the enterprising and entrepreneurial skills and knowledge components and discern value between them in their later careers. The findings suggest that EE graduates typically experience portfolio careers with multiple occupations in different sectors and roles within both employment and self-employment. Thus it is important that EE programme design includes both enterprising and entrepreneurial components to meet the future requirements of their graduates postgraduation. This study contributes new evidence regarding the value of EE in UK HEIs. This evidence should inform course design and policy makers regarding the value of EE in creating self-employment and creating enterprising employees.
published_date 2017-06-15T03:57:25Z
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