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Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract 147 views 34 downloads

Mass Surveillance in Cyberspace and the Lost Art of Keeping a Secret / Tom, Crick

Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy, and Trust, Volume: 9750, Pages: 174 - 185

Swansea University Author: Tom, Crick

Abstract

Global security concerns, acts of terrorism and organised crime activity have motivated nation states to delve into implementing measures of mass surveillance in cyberspace, the breadth of which was partly revealed by the whistleblower Edward Snowden. But are modern nation states fighting a battle i...

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Published in: Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy, and Trust
ISBN: 978-3-319-39380-3 978-3-319-39381-0
ISSN: 0302-9743 1611-3349
Published: Toronto, ON, Canada Springer 2016
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa43379
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spelling 2019-06-07T14:17:03.7474018 v2 43379 2018-08-14 Mass Surveillance in Cyberspace and the Lost Art of Keeping a Secret 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99 0000-0001-5196-9389 Tom Crick Tom Crick true false 2018-08-14 EDUC Global security concerns, acts of terrorism and organised crime activity have motivated nation states to delve into implementing measures of mass surveillance in cyberspace, the breadth of which was partly revealed by the whistleblower Edward Snowden. But are modern nation states fighting a battle in the wrong space? Is mass surveillance of cyberspace effective and are the conventional metaphors of technology control appropriate for it? Can algorithms detect, classify and decide effectively on what constitutes suspicious activity? We argue that as cyberspace is a construct that has only recently been viewed strategically, let alone indoctrinated (the UK&apos;s cyber-security strategy is only four years old), the societal impact of such bulk measures is yet much unclear – as are the assumptions about the fitness of state organisations that are charged with their oversight and the potential for unintended consequences. Recent experiences highlight the role of multiple forms of intelligence inputs, especially human- and community-based, and the need for application of such intrusive measures in a targeted manner. We believe that intrusive measures, where necessary, must be used decoupled from the seductive promises of advanced technology and ought to go hand-in-hand with means that strengthen the affected communities to identify, report and battle extremism and organised crime, in ways that safeguard the fundamental principles of our contemporary democratic Western states. Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy, and Trust 9750 174 185 Springer Toronto, ON, Canada 978-3-319-39380-3 978-3-319-39381-0 0302-9743 1611-3349 Surveillance, Cyberspace, Public trust 17 7 2016 2016-07-17 10.1007/978-3-319-39381-0_16 4th International Conference on Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy, and Trust (HAS 2016) COLLEGE NANME School of Education COLLEGE CODE EDUC Swansea University 2019-06-07T14:17:03.7474018 2018-08-14T15:44:54.0254114 College of Science Computer Science Theo Tryfonas 1 Michael Carter 2 Tom Crick 0000-0001-5196-9389 3 Panagiotis Andriotis 4 0043379-28082018113956.pdf has2016.pdf 2018-08-28T11:39:56.0170000 Output 352600 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2018-08-28T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Mass Surveillance in Cyberspace and the Lost Art of Keeping a Secret
spellingShingle Mass Surveillance in Cyberspace and the Lost Art of Keeping a Secret
Tom, Crick
title_short Mass Surveillance in Cyberspace and the Lost Art of Keeping a Secret
title_full Mass Surveillance in Cyberspace and the Lost Art of Keeping a Secret
title_fullStr Mass Surveillance in Cyberspace and the Lost Art of Keeping a Secret
title_full_unstemmed Mass Surveillance in Cyberspace and the Lost Art of Keeping a Secret
title_sort Mass Surveillance in Cyberspace and the Lost Art of Keeping a Secret
author_id_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99
author_id_fullname_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99_***_Tom, Crick
author Tom, Crick
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description Global security concerns, acts of terrorism and organised crime activity have motivated nation states to delve into implementing measures of mass surveillance in cyberspace, the breadth of which was partly revealed by the whistleblower Edward Snowden. But are modern nation states fighting a battle in the wrong space? Is mass surveillance of cyberspace effective and are the conventional metaphors of technology control appropriate for it? Can algorithms detect, classify and decide effectively on what constitutes suspicious activity? We argue that as cyberspace is a construct that has only recently been viewed strategically, let alone indoctrinated (the UK&apos;s cyber-security strategy is only four years old), the societal impact of such bulk measures is yet much unclear – as are the assumptions about the fitness of state organisations that are charged with their oversight and the potential for unintended consequences. Recent experiences highlight the role of multiple forms of intelligence inputs, especially human- and community-based, and the need for application of such intrusive measures in a targeted manner. We believe that intrusive measures, where necessary, must be used decoupled from the seductive promises of advanced technology and ought to go hand-in-hand with means that strengthen the affected communities to identify, report and battle extremism and organised crime, in ways that safeguard the fundamental principles of our contemporary democratic Western states.
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