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Measuring UK crime gangs: a social network problem / Giles Oatley; Tom Crick

Social Network Analysis and Mining, Volume: 5, Issue: 1

Swansea University Author: Crick, Tom

Abstract

This paper describes the output of a study to tackle the problem of gang-related crime in the UK; we present the intelligence and routinely-gathered data available to a UK regional police force, and describe an initial social network analysis of gangs in the Greater Manchester area of the UK between...

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Published in: Social Network Analysis and Mining
ISSN: 1869-5450 1869-5469
Published: Springer 2015
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa43380
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spelling 2018-12-04T08:49:15Z v2 43380 2018-08-14 Measuring UK crime gangs: a social network problem Tom Crick Tom Crick true 0000-0001-5196-9389 false 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99 9971fd6d74987b78a0d7fce128f8c721 z93Ri4T5hwMLTfh+6XG11n2HZhUyFASdV1DFdgIIhKs= 2018-08-14 EDUC This paper describes the output of a study to tackle the problem of gang-related crime in the UK; we present the intelligence and routinely-gathered data available to a UK regional police force, and describe an initial social network analysis of gangs in the Greater Manchester area of the UK between 2000 and 2006. By applying social network analysis techniques, we attempt to detect the birth of two new gangs based on local features (modularity, cliques) and global features (clustering coefficients). Thus for the future, identifying the changes in these can help us identify the possible birth of new gangs (sub-networks) in the social system. Furthermore, we study the dynamics of these networks globally and locally, and have identified the global characteristics that tell us that they are not random graphs—they are small world graphs—implying that the formation of gangs is not a random event. However, we are not yet able to conclude anything significant about scale-free characteristics due to insufficient sample size. A final analysis looks at gang roles and develops further insight into the nature of the different link types, referring to Klerks' 'third generation' analysis, as well as a brief discussion of the potential UK policy applications of this work. Journal article Social Network Analysis and Mining 5 1 Springer 1869-5450 1869-5469 Gangs, Gun crime, Scale-free networks, Small-world networks, Social distance, Communities, Crime policy 0 12 2015 2015-12-01 10.1007/s13278-015-0265-1 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13278-015-0265-1 College of Arts and Humanities School of Education CAAH EDUC None 2018-12-04T08:49:15Z 2018-08-14T15:44:55Z College of Science Computer Science Giles Oatley 1 Tom Crick 0000-0001-5196-9389 2 0043380-29082018195156.pdf snam2015.pdf 2018-08-29T19:51:56Z Output 2220538 application/pdf AM true Updated Copyright 09/10/2018 2018-08-29T00:00:00 true eng
title Measuring UK crime gangs: a social network problem
spellingShingle Measuring UK crime gangs: a social network problem
Crick, Tom
title_short Measuring UK crime gangs: a social network problem
title_full Measuring UK crime gangs: a social network problem
title_fullStr Measuring UK crime gangs: a social network problem
title_full_unstemmed Measuring UK crime gangs: a social network problem
title_sort Measuring UK crime gangs: a social network problem
author_id_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99
author_id_fullname_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99_***_Crick, Tom
author Crick, Tom
author2 Giles Oatley
Tom Crick
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publishDate 2015
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1869-5469
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publisher Springer
college_str College of Science
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url https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13278-015-0265-1
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description This paper describes the output of a study to tackle the problem of gang-related crime in the UK; we present the intelligence and routinely-gathered data available to a UK regional police force, and describe an initial social network analysis of gangs in the Greater Manchester area of the UK between 2000 and 2006. By applying social network analysis techniques, we attempt to detect the birth of two new gangs based on local features (modularity, cliques) and global features (clustering coefficients). Thus for the future, identifying the changes in these can help us identify the possible birth of new gangs (sub-networks) in the social system. Furthermore, we study the dynamics of these networks globally and locally, and have identified the global characteristics that tell us that they are not random graphs—they are small world graphs—implying that the formation of gangs is not a random event. However, we are not yet able to conclude anything significant about scale-free characteristics due to insufficient sample size. A final analysis looks at gang roles and develops further insight into the nature of the different link types, referring to Klerks' 'third generation' analysis, as well as a brief discussion of the potential UK policy applications of this work.
published_date 2015-12-01T12:12:10Z
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