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What can knowledge of the energy landscape tell us about animal movement trajectories and space use? A case study with humans / Emmanouil Lempidakis; Rory Wilson; Adrian Luckman; Richard Metcalfe

Journal of Theoretical Biology, Volume: 457, Pages: 101 - 111

Swansea University Authors: Rory, Wilson, Adrian, Luckman, Richard, Metcalfe

Abstract

Recent work has highlighted that ‘energy landscapes’ should affect animal movement trajectories although expected patterns are rarely quantified. We developed a model, incorporating speed, substrate, superstrate and terrain slope, to determine minimized movement costs for an energetically well-under...

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Published in: Journal of Theoretical Biology
ISSN: 00225193
Published: Elsevier 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa43541
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spelling 2018-10-09T16:27:19.2131988 v2 43541 2018-08-22 What can knowledge of the energy landscape tell us about animal movement trajectories and space use? A case study with humans 017bc6dd155098860945dc6249c4e9bc 0000-0003-3177-0177 Rory Wilson Rory Wilson true false 008cb668b2671b653a88677f075799a9 0000-0002-9618-5905 Adrian Luckman Adrian Luckman true false 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf 0000-0003-0980-2977 Richard Metcalfe Richard Metcalfe true false 2018-08-22 SBI Recent work has highlighted that ‘energy landscapes’ should affect animal movement trajectories although expected patterns are rarely quantified. We developed a model, incorporating speed, substrate, superstrate and terrain slope, to determine minimized movement costs for an energetically well-understood model animal, Homo sapiens, negotiating an urban environment, to highlight features that promote increased tortuosity and affect area use. The model showed that high differential travel power costs between adjacent areas, stemming from substantial environmental heterogeneity in the energy landscape, produced the most tortuous least-cost paths across scales. In addition, projected territory size and shape in territorial animals is likely to be affected by the details in the energy landscape. We suggest that cognisance of energy landscapes is important for understanding animal movement patterns and that energetic differences between least cost- and observed pathways might code for, and give an explicit value to, other important landscape-use factors, such as the landscape of fear, food availability or social effects. Journal Article Journal of Theoretical Biology 457 101 111 Elsevier 00225193 Optimal movement, Least cost pathways, Tortuosity, Energy landscape, Iso-Energy Polygons 18 8 2018 2018-08-18 10.1016/j.jtbi.2018.08.024 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002251931830403X It is confirmed that the datasets generated in the present study, are available via the Figshare repository and the following links: https://figshare.com/s/1d733bffa08a01806d7c.https://figshare.com/s/6f9be951f5e755a9843d.https://figshare.com/s/9fe7c452064f6f28a6c1.https://figshare.com/s/37bd3d14ec0865df471b.https://figshare.com/s/86b28d95cbee8921f3dd. COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2018-10-09T16:27:19.2131988 2018-08-22T15:24:06.9405736 College of Engineering Sports Science Emmanouil Lempidakis 1 Rory Wilson 0000-0003-3177-0177 2 Adrian Luckman 0000-0002-9618-5905 3 Richard Metcalfe 0000-0003-0980-2977 4 0043541-28082018094247.pdf lempidakis2018.pdf 2018-08-28T09:42:47.1730000 Output 2174908 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2019-08-18T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title What can knowledge of the energy landscape tell us about animal movement trajectories and space use? A case study with humans
spellingShingle What can knowledge of the energy landscape tell us about animal movement trajectories and space use? A case study with humans
Rory, Wilson
Adrian, Luckman
Richard, Metcalfe
title_short What can knowledge of the energy landscape tell us about animal movement trajectories and space use? A case study with humans
title_full What can knowledge of the energy landscape tell us about animal movement trajectories and space use? A case study with humans
title_fullStr What can knowledge of the energy landscape tell us about animal movement trajectories and space use? A case study with humans
title_full_unstemmed What can knowledge of the energy landscape tell us about animal movement trajectories and space use? A case study with humans
title_sort What can knowledge of the energy landscape tell us about animal movement trajectories and space use? A case study with humans
author_id_str_mv 017bc6dd155098860945dc6249c4e9bc
008cb668b2671b653a88677f075799a9
9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf
author_id_fullname_str_mv 017bc6dd155098860945dc6249c4e9bc_***_Rory, Wilson
008cb668b2671b653a88677f075799a9_***_Adrian, Luckman
9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf_***_Richard, Metcalfe
author Rory, Wilson
Adrian, Luckman
Richard, Metcalfe
author2 Emmanouil Lempidakis
Rory Wilson
Adrian Luckman
Richard Metcalfe
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Theoretical Biology
container_volume 457
container_start_page 101
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 00225193
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.jtbi.2018.08.024
publisher Elsevier
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
url https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002251931830403X
document_store_str 1
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description Recent work has highlighted that ‘energy landscapes’ should affect animal movement trajectories although expected patterns are rarely quantified. We developed a model, incorporating speed, substrate, superstrate and terrain slope, to determine minimized movement costs for an energetically well-understood model animal, Homo sapiens, negotiating an urban environment, to highlight features that promote increased tortuosity and affect area use. The model showed that high differential travel power costs between adjacent areas, stemming from substantial environmental heterogeneity in the energy landscape, produced the most tortuous least-cost paths across scales. In addition, projected territory size and shape in territorial animals is likely to be affected by the details in the energy landscape. We suggest that cognisance of energy landscapes is important for understanding animal movement patterns and that energetic differences between least cost- and observed pathways might code for, and give an explicit value to, other important landscape-use factors, such as the landscape of fear, food availability or social effects.
published_date 2018-08-18T03:59:38Z
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