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The Problem of the P3: Public-Private Partnerships in National Cyber Security Strategies / Madeline Carr, Tom Crick

Proceedings of 1st International Conference on Cyber Security for Sustainable Society

Swansea University Author: Tom Crick

Abstract

Cyber security is an emerging -- and increasingly high profile -- national policy concern; not only in terms of material vulnerabilities but also in terms of conceptualising security approaches. Many states, particularly Western democracies, have situated the 'public-private partnership' (...

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Published in: Proceedings of 1st International Conference on Cyber Security for Sustainable Society
ISSN: 2052-8604
Published: Coventry, UK 2015
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa43770
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last_indexed 2018-10-15T19:18:02Z
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spelling 2018-10-15T14:47:41.1404352 v2 43770 2018-09-11 The Problem of the P3: Public-Private Partnerships in National Cyber Security Strategies 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99 0000-0001-5196-9389 Tom Crick Tom Crick true false 2018-09-11 EDUC Cyber security is an emerging -- and increasingly high profile -- national policy concern; not only in terms of material vulnerabilities but also in terms of conceptualising security approaches. Many states, particularly Western democracies, have situated the 'public-private partnership' (P3) at the centre of their national cyber security strategies. However, there has been a persistent ambiguity around this fundamental concept: policymakers regard the state as without the capability and also without the mandate to impose security requirements beyond government-owned systems; the private sector, however, is highly averse to accepting responsibility for national security and will fund cyber security only within the parameters of the profit/risk calculation appropriate for a shareholder-based arrangement. Amidst increasing suggestions that a market-led approach to cyber security has failed, a deeper exploration at the ideas and concepts behind this approach finds that a reliance on the P3 emerges from deeply held and shared beliefs about government legitimacy and private authority which may not be easily reconciled with wider national security issues for a modern digital economy. Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract Proceedings of 1st International Conference on Cyber Security for Sustainable Society Coventry, UK 2052-8604 26 2 2015 2015-02-26 1st International Conference on Cyber Security for Sustainable Society (CSSS 2015) COLLEGE NANME Education COLLEGE CODE EDUC Swansea University 2018-10-15T14:47:41.1404352 2018-09-11T19:22:04.7208545 College of Arts and Humanities College of Arts and Humanities Madeline Carr 1 Tom Crick 0000-0001-5196-9389 2 0043770-11092018192456.pdf CSSS2015_paper14_cameraready.pdf 2018-09-11T19:24:56.8830000 Output 571267 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2018-09-11T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title The Problem of the P3: Public-Private Partnerships in National Cyber Security Strategies
spellingShingle The Problem of the P3: Public-Private Partnerships in National Cyber Security Strategies
Tom, Crick
title_short The Problem of the P3: Public-Private Partnerships in National Cyber Security Strategies
title_full The Problem of the P3: Public-Private Partnerships in National Cyber Security Strategies
title_fullStr The Problem of the P3: Public-Private Partnerships in National Cyber Security Strategies
title_full_unstemmed The Problem of the P3: Public-Private Partnerships in National Cyber Security Strategies
title_sort The Problem of the P3: Public-Private Partnerships in National Cyber Security Strategies
author_id_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99
author_id_fullname_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99_***_Tom, Crick
author Tom, Crick
author2 Madeline Carr
Tom Crick
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description Cyber security is an emerging -- and increasingly high profile -- national policy concern; not only in terms of material vulnerabilities but also in terms of conceptualising security approaches. Many states, particularly Western democracies, have situated the 'public-private partnership' (P3) at the centre of their national cyber security strategies. However, there has been a persistent ambiguity around this fundamental concept: policymakers regard the state as without the capability and also without the mandate to impose security requirements beyond government-owned systems; the private sector, however, is highly averse to accepting responsibility for national security and will fund cyber security only within the parameters of the profit/risk calculation appropriate for a shareholder-based arrangement. Amidst increasing suggestions that a market-led approach to cyber security has failed, a deeper exploration at the ideas and concepts behind this approach finds that a reliance on the P3 emerges from deeply held and shared beliefs about government legitimacy and private authority which may not be easily reconciled with wider national security issues for a modern digital economy.
published_date 2015-02-26T03:59:20Z
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