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Wastewater treatment: Occurrence, effects, and treatment of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in water / I. M. Mujtaba, Chedly Tizaoui

The Water-Food-Energy Nexus: Processes, Technologies, and Challenges, Pages: 157 - 179

Swansea University Author: Chedly Tizaoui

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DOI (Published version): 10.4324/9781315153209

Abstract

Water is an essential commodity for human well-being. The World Health Organization (Howard and Bartram, 2003) has estimated that a person needs at least 7.5 L of water per day for drinking, food, and personal hygiene. A person requires 50 L of water per day to meet other needs. A poor water supply...

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Published in: The Water-Food-Energy Nexus: Processes, Technologies, and Challenges
ISBN: 9781315153209
Published: CRC Press 2017
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa44660
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Abstract: Water is an essential commodity for human well-being. The World Health Organization (Howard and Bartram, 2003) has estimated that a person needs at least 7.5 L of water per day for drinking, food, and personal hygiene. A person requires 50 L of water per day to meet other needs. A poor water supply can affect health either directly or indirectly. Incidents of many water-connected diseases can be reduced noticeably by providing sufficient quantity of potable water (Fewtrell et al., 2005). Pathogens from human and animal excreta are transmitted through soil, surface and groundwater, and by hands, flies, and other vectors (Figure 3.1). Finally, humans get exposed to these pathogens either through consumption of contaminated water, food, or through unsanitary contact.
College: College of Engineering
Start Page: 157
End Page: 179