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'Missing milk': an exploration of migrant mothers' experiences of breastfeeding in the UK

Louise Condon

Dowling, S. and Pontin, D. eds., 2018. Social experiences of breastfeeding: Building bridges between research, policy and practice. Policy Press.

Swansea University Author: Louise Condon

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Abstract

When mothers from countries with high breastfeeding rates come to live in the UK their infant feeding practices frequently change to align with those of the majority population. Migrant mothers are less likely to breastfeed beyond the first few weeks, and introduce solids early. Thus babies of migra...

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Published in: Dowling, S. and Pontin, D. eds., 2018. Social experiences of breastfeeding: Building bridges between research, policy and practice. Policy Press.
ISSN: 978-1-4473-3850-5
Published: Bristol Policy Press 2018
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa44780
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first_indexed 2018-10-04T19:03:15Z
last_indexed 2018-10-04T19:03:15Z
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spelling 2018-10-04T18:42:22.9758468 v2 44780 2018-10-04 'Missing milk': an exploration of migrant mothers' experiences of breastfeeding in the UK 6e94805454a9baebe13c15c17f09f3ab Louise Condon Louise Condon true false 2018-10-04 FGMHL When mothers from countries with high breastfeeding rates come to live in the UK their infant feeding practices frequently change to align with those of the majority population. Migrant mothers are less likely to breastfeed beyond the first few weeks, and introduce solids early. Thus babies of migrant mothers are 'missing' the breast milk which would have been their birth right in their countries of origin, and are exposed to the health risks of formula feeding and early solids. Influential in this change is a desire to fit in with the infant feeding 'norms' of the country of migration, and also a desire to escape perceived associations of breastfeeding with poverty and disadvantage. This situation is insufficiently recognised in the UK, and little is known about how best to maintain optimal infant feeding behaviours in migrant groups. Book chapter Dowling, S. and Pontin, D. eds., 2018. Social experiences of breastfeeding: Building bridges between research, policy and practice. Policy Press. Policy Press Bristol 978-1-4473-3850-5 12 9 2018 2018-09-12 COLLEGE NANME Medicine, Health and Life Science - Faculty COLLEGE CODE FGMHL Swansea University 2018-10-04T18:42:22.9758468 2018-10-04T18:41:55.5316327 Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences School of Health and Social Care - Nursing Louise Condon 1
title 'Missing milk': an exploration of migrant mothers' experiences of breastfeeding in the UK
spellingShingle 'Missing milk': an exploration of migrant mothers' experiences of breastfeeding in the UK
Louise Condon
title_short 'Missing milk': an exploration of migrant mothers' experiences of breastfeeding in the UK
title_full 'Missing milk': an exploration of migrant mothers' experiences of breastfeeding in the UK
title_fullStr 'Missing milk': an exploration of migrant mothers' experiences of breastfeeding in the UK
title_full_unstemmed 'Missing milk': an exploration of migrant mothers' experiences of breastfeeding in the UK
title_sort 'Missing milk': an exploration of migrant mothers' experiences of breastfeeding in the UK
author_id_str_mv 6e94805454a9baebe13c15c17f09f3ab
author_id_fullname_str_mv 6e94805454a9baebe13c15c17f09f3ab_***_Louise Condon
author Louise Condon
author2 Louise Condon
format Book chapter
container_title Dowling, S. and Pontin, D. eds., 2018. Social experiences of breastfeeding: Building bridges between research, policy and practice. Policy Press.
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 978-1-4473-3850-5
publisher Policy Press
college_str Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
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hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
department_str School of Health and Social Care - Nursing{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences{{{_:::_}}}School of Health and Social Care - Nursing
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description When mothers from countries with high breastfeeding rates come to live in the UK their infant feeding practices frequently change to align with those of the majority population. Migrant mothers are less likely to breastfeed beyond the first few weeks, and introduce solids early. Thus babies of migrant mothers are 'missing' the breast milk which would have been their birth right in their countries of origin, and are exposed to the health risks of formula feeding and early solids. Influential in this change is a desire to fit in with the infant feeding 'norms' of the country of migration, and also a desire to escape perceived associations of breastfeeding with poverty and disadvantage. This situation is insufficiently recognised in the UK, and little is known about how best to maintain optimal infant feeding behaviours in migrant groups.
published_date 2018-09-12T03:56:11Z
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