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Journal article 512 views 268 downloads

“Don’t look down on us!”

Glenn Miles, Olivia Blase, Katie Clark, Rachel J. Ding, Theresa Geyer

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume: ahead-of-print, Issue: ahead-of-print

Swansea University Author: Glenn Miles

Abstract

Although some research and social support has been done with entertainment workers in KTV bars, very little has been done with masseuse women. This may be partly due to a prevalent focus on girls under 18 years, thereby excluding most masseuses.98 female participants completed an interview answering...

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Published in: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
ISSN: 0144-333X
Published: Emerald 2020
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa44887
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Abstract: Although some research and social support has been done with entertainment workers in KTV bars, very little has been done with masseuse women. This may be partly due to a prevalent focus on girls under 18 years, thereby excluding most masseuses.98 female participants completed an interview answering both open and closed questions concerning relationships, stigma and discrimination and personal sexual abuse among other topics.This study finds that many women working in the massage parlor industry are vulnerable to various threats, including sexual exploitation and abuse. Dependency structures within the massage parlor as well as with their families seem to play a key role in the life situations that can be positive as well as negative, and in some cases both.This is not a prevalence study so all figures are tentative. The women were deeply concerned that they might be stigmatized further so they may not have revealed the extent of their challengesMore research and work with this vulnerable group is vital. They should be recognised as a vulnerable group who have rightsThe findings provide a baseline evaluation of the vulnerable conditions of the massage industry for women in Cambodia. Specifically, that stigma, discrimination, physical and sexual abuse, as well as a lack of access to education are all vulnerabilities not commonly covered, especially with adult women working in the entertainment industry.Understanding the reality of life as perceived by Phnom Penh’s female masseuses in the lower-priced massage parlors is therefore largely unknown so a study of this kind is necessary.
Keywords: women, slavery, sex workers, Southeast Asia, sexual exploitation, cambodia
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Issue: ahead-of-print