No Cover Image

Journal article 384 views 49 downloads

Perceptions of Visualizing Physical Activity as a 3D-Printed Object: Formative Study / Sam Graeme Morgan Crossley, Melitta McNarry, Joanne Hudson, Parisa Eslambolchilar, Zoe Knowles, Kelly Mackintosh

Journal of Medical Internet Research, Volume: 21, Issue: 1, Start page: e12064

Swansea University Authors: Melitta McNarry, Joanne Hudson, Kelly Mackintosh

  • crossley2019v2.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY).

    Download (10.89MB)

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.2196/12064

Abstract

Background: The UK government recommends that children engage in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity for at least 60 min every day. Despite associated physiological and psychosocial benefits of physical activity, many youth fail to meet these guidelines partly due to sedentary screen-based pursui...

Full description

Published in: Journal of Medical Internet Research
ISSN: 1438-8871
Published: 2019
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa44939
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2018-10-18T13:20:31Z
last_indexed 2019-02-12T20:00:40Z
id cronfa44939
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2019-02-12T16:50:41.6033590</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>44939</id><entry>2018-10-18</entry><title>Perceptions of Visualizing Physical Activity as a 3D-Printed Object: Formative Study</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-0813-7477</ORCID><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><name>Melitta McNarry</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-4732-8356</ORCID><firstname>Joanne</firstname><surname>Hudson</surname><name>Joanne Hudson</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-0355-6357</ORCID><firstname>Kelly</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><name>Kelly Mackintosh</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2018-10-18</date><deptcode>STSC</deptcode><abstract>Background: The UK government recommends that children engage in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity for at least 60 min every day. Despite associated physiological and psychosocial benefits of physical activity, many youth fail to meet these guidelines partly due to sedentary screen-based pursuits displacing active behaviors. However, technological advances such as 3D printing have enabled innovative methods of visualizing and conceptualizing physical activity as a tangible output.Objective: The aim of this study was to elicit children&#x2019;s, adolescents&#x2019;, parents&#x2019;, and teachers&#x2019; perceptions and understanding of 3D physical activity objects to inform the design of future 3D models of physical activity.Methods: A total of 28 primary school children (aged 8.4 [SD 0.3] years; 15 boys) and 42 secondary school adolescents (aged 14.4 [SD 0.3] years; 22 boys) participated in semistructured focus groups, with individual interviews conducted with 8 teachers (2 male) and 7 parents (2 male). Questions addressed understanding of the physical activity guidelines, 3D model design, and both motivation for and potential engagement with a 3D physical activity model intervention. Pupils were asked to use Play-Doh to create and describe a model that could represent their physical activity levels (PAL). Data were transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed, and key emergent themes were represented using pen profiles.Results: Pupils understood the concept of visualizing physical activity as a 3D object, although adolescents were able to better analyze and critique differences between low and high PAL. Both youths and adults preferred a 3D model representing a week of physical activity data when compared with other temporal representations. Furthermore, all participants highlighted that 3D models could act as a motivational tool to enhance youths&#x2019; physical activity. From the Play-Doh designs, 2 key themes were identified by pupils, with preferences indicated for models of abstract representations of physical activity or bar charts depicting physical activity, respectively.Conclusions: These novel findings highlight the potential utility of 3D objects of physical activity as a mechanism to enhance children&#x2019;s and adolescents&#x2019; understanding of, and motivation to increase, their PAL. This study suggests that 3D printing may offer a unique strategy for promoting physical activity in these groups.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Journal of Medical Internet Research</journal><volume>21</volume><journalNumber>1</journalNumber><paginationStart>e12064</paginationStart><publisher/><issnElectronic>1438-8871</issnElectronic><keywords>3D printing; feedback; youth; education; school</keywords><publishedDay>26</publishedDay><publishedMonth>1</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2019</publishedYear><publishedDate>2019-01-26</publishedDate><doi>10.2196/12064</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Sport and Exercise Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>STSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2019-02-12T16:50:41.6033590</lastEdited><Created>2018-10-18T08:38:59.4040992</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Sports Science</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Sam Graeme Morgan</firstname><surname>Crossley</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0813-7477</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Joanne</firstname><surname>Hudson</surname><orcid>0000-0003-4732-8356</orcid><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Parisa</firstname><surname>Eslambolchilar</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Zoe</firstname><surname>Knowles</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Kelly</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0355-6357</orcid><order>6</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0044939-11022019092154.pdf</filename><originalFilename>crossley2019v2.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2019-02-11T09:21:54.7970000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>11783276</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><embargoDate>2019-02-11T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><documentNotes>Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY).</documentNotes><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2019-02-12T16:50:41.6033590 v2 44939 2018-10-18 Perceptions of Visualizing Physical Activity as a 3D-Printed Object: Formative Study 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false 304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99 0000-0003-4732-8356 Joanne Hudson Joanne Hudson true false bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214 0000-0003-0355-6357 Kelly Mackintosh Kelly Mackintosh true false 2018-10-18 STSC Background: The UK government recommends that children engage in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity for at least 60 min every day. Despite associated physiological and psychosocial benefits of physical activity, many youth fail to meet these guidelines partly due to sedentary screen-based pursuits displacing active behaviors. However, technological advances such as 3D printing have enabled innovative methods of visualizing and conceptualizing physical activity as a tangible output.Objective: The aim of this study was to elicit children’s, adolescents’, parents’, and teachers’ perceptions and understanding of 3D physical activity objects to inform the design of future 3D models of physical activity.Methods: A total of 28 primary school children (aged 8.4 [SD 0.3] years; 15 boys) and 42 secondary school adolescents (aged 14.4 [SD 0.3] years; 22 boys) participated in semistructured focus groups, with individual interviews conducted with 8 teachers (2 male) and 7 parents (2 male). Questions addressed understanding of the physical activity guidelines, 3D model design, and both motivation for and potential engagement with a 3D physical activity model intervention. Pupils were asked to use Play-Doh to create and describe a model that could represent their physical activity levels (PAL). Data were transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed, and key emergent themes were represented using pen profiles.Results: Pupils understood the concept of visualizing physical activity as a 3D object, although adolescents were able to better analyze and critique differences between low and high PAL. Both youths and adults preferred a 3D model representing a week of physical activity data when compared with other temporal representations. Furthermore, all participants highlighted that 3D models could act as a motivational tool to enhance youths’ physical activity. From the Play-Doh designs, 2 key themes were identified by pupils, with preferences indicated for models of abstract representations of physical activity or bar charts depicting physical activity, respectively.Conclusions: These novel findings highlight the potential utility of 3D objects of physical activity as a mechanism to enhance children’s and adolescents’ understanding of, and motivation to increase, their PAL. This study suggests that 3D printing may offer a unique strategy for promoting physical activity in these groups. Journal Article Journal of Medical Internet Research 21 1 e12064 1438-8871 3D printing; feedback; youth; education; school 26 1 2019 2019-01-26 10.2196/12064 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2019-02-12T16:50:41.6033590 2018-10-18T08:38:59.4040992 College of Engineering Sports Science Sam Graeme Morgan Crossley 1 Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 2 Joanne Hudson 0000-0003-4732-8356 3 Parisa Eslambolchilar 4 Zoe Knowles 5 Kelly Mackintosh 0000-0003-0355-6357 6 0044939-11022019092154.pdf crossley2019v2.pdf 2019-02-11T09:21:54.7970000 Output 11783276 application/pdf Version of Record true 2019-02-11T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY). true eng
title Perceptions of Visualizing Physical Activity as a 3D-Printed Object: Formative Study
spellingShingle Perceptions of Visualizing Physical Activity as a 3D-Printed Object: Formative Study
Melitta, McNarry
Joanne, Hudson
Kelly, Mackintosh
title_short Perceptions of Visualizing Physical Activity as a 3D-Printed Object: Formative Study
title_full Perceptions of Visualizing Physical Activity as a 3D-Printed Object: Formative Study
title_fullStr Perceptions of Visualizing Physical Activity as a 3D-Printed Object: Formative Study
title_full_unstemmed Perceptions of Visualizing Physical Activity as a 3D-Printed Object: Formative Study
title_sort Perceptions of Visualizing Physical Activity as a 3D-Printed Object: Formative Study
author_id_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398
304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214
author_id_fullname_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta, McNarry
304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99_***_Joanne, Hudson
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214_***_Kelly, Mackintosh
author Melitta, McNarry
Joanne, Hudson
Kelly, Mackintosh
author2 Sam Graeme Morgan Crossley
Melitta McNarry
Joanne Hudson
Parisa Eslambolchilar
Zoe Knowles
Kelly Mackintosh
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Medical Internet Research
container_volume 21
container_issue 1
container_start_page e12064
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 1438-8871
doi_str_mv 10.2196/12064
college_str College of Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Background: The UK government recommends that children engage in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity for at least 60 min every day. Despite associated physiological and psychosocial benefits of physical activity, many youth fail to meet these guidelines partly due to sedentary screen-based pursuits displacing active behaviors. However, technological advances such as 3D printing have enabled innovative methods of visualizing and conceptualizing physical activity as a tangible output.Objective: The aim of this study was to elicit children’s, adolescents’, parents’, and teachers’ perceptions and understanding of 3D physical activity objects to inform the design of future 3D models of physical activity.Methods: A total of 28 primary school children (aged 8.4 [SD 0.3] years; 15 boys) and 42 secondary school adolescents (aged 14.4 [SD 0.3] years; 22 boys) participated in semistructured focus groups, with individual interviews conducted with 8 teachers (2 male) and 7 parents (2 male). Questions addressed understanding of the physical activity guidelines, 3D model design, and both motivation for and potential engagement with a 3D physical activity model intervention. Pupils were asked to use Play-Doh to create and describe a model that could represent their physical activity levels (PAL). Data were transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed, and key emergent themes were represented using pen profiles.Results: Pupils understood the concept of visualizing physical activity as a 3D object, although adolescents were able to better analyze and critique differences between low and high PAL. Both youths and adults preferred a 3D model representing a week of physical activity data when compared with other temporal representations. Furthermore, all participants highlighted that 3D models could act as a motivational tool to enhance youths’ physical activity. From the Play-Doh designs, 2 key themes were identified by pupils, with preferences indicated for models of abstract representations of physical activity or bar charts depicting physical activity, respectively.Conclusions: These novel findings highlight the potential utility of 3D objects of physical activity as a mechanism to enhance children’s and adolescents’ understanding of, and motivation to increase, their PAL. This study suggests that 3D printing may offer a unique strategy for promoting physical activity in these groups.
published_date 2019-01-26T04:04:51Z
_version_ 1711931906971402240
score 10.823389