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Reproductive Rebellions in Britain and the Republic of Ireland: Contemporary and Past Abortion Activism and Alternative Sites of Care / Ben Kasstan, Sarah Crook

Feminist Encounters: A Journal of Critical Studies in Culture and Politics, Volume: 2, Issue: 2

Swansea University Author: Sarah Crook

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DOI (Published version): 10.20897/femenc/3885

Abstract

This paper explores how feminist movements in contemporary Ireland and the Women’s Liberation Movement in Britain in the 1970s and 1980s have subverted state domination and have struggled for self-governance of the female bodies in ways that represent a continuum of responses to restrictive legislat...

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Published in: Feminist Encounters: A Journal of Critical Studies in Culture and Politics
ISSN: 25424920
Published: Lectico 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa45062
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first_indexed 2018-10-23T13:23:42Z
last_indexed 2018-11-05T20:15:48Z
id cronfa45062
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spelling 2018-11-05T14:50:01.0936636 v2 45062 2018-10-23 Reproductive Rebellions in Britain and the Republic of Ireland: Contemporary and Past Abortion Activism and Alternative Sites of Care b35484cf604604b6d6bc6873677417d1 0000-0002-1288-1488 Sarah Crook Sarah Crook true false 2018-10-23 AHIS This paper explores how feminist movements in contemporary Ireland and the Women’s Liberation Movement in Britain in the 1970s and 1980s have subverted state domination and have struggled for self-governance of the female bodies in ways that represent a continuum of responses to restrictive legislation. We address how discourses of liberatory knowledges and autonomy can give rise to ‘illegitimate’ forms of self-care as well as extra-state care (or ‘exile’) across historically-situated points in time. Moreover, we illustrate how social resistance can influence political action surrounding abortion law reform, which can be understood as an attempt to bring the ‘illegitimate’ into the realm of state control and guardianship. Our comparative approach illustrates how campaigns around reproductive rights in contemporary Ireland and in 1970s and 1980s Britain continue to share three crucial strategies: to raise consciousness and awareness; to encourage mobilisation and self-organising of care at the individual and collective levels; and to seek legislative change. Mapping the continuities in how feminist campaigns configure reproductive health and the body as a site of activism in the body politic heralds renewed feminist encounters with the medical humanities, by (re)situating women’s bodies in a historically contiguous struggle for reproductive justice. Journal Article Feminist Encounters: A Journal of Critical Studies in Culture and Politics 2 2 Lectico 25424920 abortion, Ireland, Women&apos;s Liberation Movement, Britain, feminist epistemology 27 9 2018 2018-09-27 10.20897/femenc/3885 http://www.lectitopublishing.nl/download/reproductive-rebellions-in-britain-and-the-republic-of-ireland-contemporary-and-past-abortion-3885.pdf COLLEGE NANME History COLLEGE CODE AHIS Swansea University 2018-11-05T14:50:01.0936636 2018-10-23T10:28:07.5988679 College of Arts and Humanities History Ben Kasstan 1 Sarah Crook 0000-0002-1288-1488 2 0045062-05112018144916.pdf 45062.pdf 2018-11-05T14:49:16.4400000 Output 2482640 application/pdf Version of Record true 2018-11-04T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY). true eng
title Reproductive Rebellions in Britain and the Republic of Ireland: Contemporary and Past Abortion Activism and Alternative Sites of Care
spellingShingle Reproductive Rebellions in Britain and the Republic of Ireland: Contemporary and Past Abortion Activism and Alternative Sites of Care
Sarah, Crook
title_short Reproductive Rebellions in Britain and the Republic of Ireland: Contemporary and Past Abortion Activism and Alternative Sites of Care
title_full Reproductive Rebellions in Britain and the Republic of Ireland: Contemporary and Past Abortion Activism and Alternative Sites of Care
title_fullStr Reproductive Rebellions in Britain and the Republic of Ireland: Contemporary and Past Abortion Activism and Alternative Sites of Care
title_full_unstemmed Reproductive Rebellions in Britain and the Republic of Ireland: Contemporary and Past Abortion Activism and Alternative Sites of Care
title_sort Reproductive Rebellions in Britain and the Republic of Ireland: Contemporary and Past Abortion Activism and Alternative Sites of Care
author_id_str_mv b35484cf604604b6d6bc6873677417d1
author_id_fullname_str_mv b35484cf604604b6d6bc6873677417d1_***_Sarah, Crook
author Sarah, Crook
author2 Ben Kasstan
Sarah Crook
format Journal article
container_title Feminist Encounters: A Journal of Critical Studies in Culture and Politics
container_volume 2
container_issue 2
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 25424920
doi_str_mv 10.20897/femenc/3885
publisher Lectico
college_str College of Arts and Humanities
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hierarchy_top_title College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_parent_title College of Arts and Humanities
department_str History{{{_:::_}}}College of Arts and Humanities{{{_:::_}}}History
url http://www.lectitopublishing.nl/download/reproductive-rebellions-in-britain-and-the-republic-of-ireland-contemporary-and-past-abortion-3885.pdf
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description This paper explores how feminist movements in contemporary Ireland and the Women’s Liberation Movement in Britain in the 1970s and 1980s have subverted state domination and have struggled for self-governance of the female bodies in ways that represent a continuum of responses to restrictive legislation. We address how discourses of liberatory knowledges and autonomy can give rise to ‘illegitimate’ forms of self-care as well as extra-state care (or ‘exile’) across historically-situated points in time. Moreover, we illustrate how social resistance can influence political action surrounding abortion law reform, which can be understood as an attempt to bring the ‘illegitimate’ into the realm of state control and guardianship. Our comparative approach illustrates how campaigns around reproductive rights in contemporary Ireland and in 1970s and 1980s Britain continue to share three crucial strategies: to raise consciousness and awareness; to encourage mobilisation and self-organising of care at the individual and collective levels; and to seek legislative change. Mapping the continuities in how feminist campaigns configure reproductive health and the body as a site of activism in the body politic heralds renewed feminist encounters with the medical humanities, by (re)situating women’s bodies in a historically contiguous struggle for reproductive justice.
published_date 2018-09-27T04:01:07Z
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