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Oxygen Uptake Kinetics in Youth: Characteristics, Interpretation, and Application

Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo

Pediatric Exercise Science, Volume: 31, Issue: 2, Pages: 175 - 183

Swansea University Author: Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1123/pes.2018-0177

Abstract

Pulmonary oxygen uptake ( formula presented ) kinetics, which describes the aerobic response to near instantaneous changes in metabolic demand, provides a valuable insight into the control and coordination of oxidative phosphorylation during exercise. Despite their applicability to the highly sporad...

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Published in: Pediatric Exercise Science
ISSN: 0899-8493 1543-2920
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa45206
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Abstract: Pulmonary oxygen uptake ( formula presented ) kinetics, which describes the aerobic response to near instantaneous changes in metabolic demand, provides a valuable insight into the control and coordination of oxidative phosphorylation during exercise. Despite their applicability to the highly sporadic habitual physical activity and exercise patterns of children, relatively little is known regarding the influence of internal and external stimuli on the dynamic formula presented response. Although insufficient evidence is available during moderate-intensity exercise, an age-related slowing of the phase 2 time constant (τ) and augmentation of the formula presented slow component appears to manifest during heavy-intensity exercise, which may be related to changes in the muscle phosphate controllers of oxidative phosphorylation, muscle oxygen delivery and utilization, and/or muscle fiber type recruitment patterns. Similar to findings in adults, aerobic training is associated with a faster phase 2 τ and smaller formula presented slow component in youth, independent of age or maturity, indicative of an enhanced oxidative metabolism. However, a lack of longitudinal or intervention-based training studies limits our ability to attribute these changes to training per se. Further, methodologically rigorous studies are required to fully resolve the interaction(s) between age, sex, biological maturity, and external stimuli, such as exercise training and exercise intensity and the dynamic formula presented response at the onset and offset of exercise.
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 2
Start Page: 175
End Page: 183