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Lung cancer: a new frontier for microbiome research and clinical translation

Luis AJ Mur, Sharon A Huws, Simon JS Cameron, Paul Lewis, Keir E Lewis

ecancermedicalscience, Volume: 12

Swansea University Author: Paul Lewis

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Abstract

The lung microbiome has been shown to reflect a range of pulmonary diseases—for example: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis. Studies have now begun to show microbiological changes in the lung that correlate with lung cancer (LC) which could provide new insights...

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Published in: ecancermedicalscience
ISSN: 17546605
Published: 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa45296
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first_indexed 2018-10-30T20:30:51Z
last_indexed 2018-12-03T14:25:28Z
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spelling 2018-12-03T12:49:10.3699943 v2 45296 2018-10-30 Lung cancer: a new frontier for microbiome research and clinical translation 46dfc22d7468f247c390ba0c6cd8fba6 Paul Lewis Paul Lewis true false 2018-10-30 SGMGT The lung microbiome has been shown to reflect a range of pulmonary diseases—for example: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis. Studies have now begun to show microbiological changes in the lung that correlate with lung cancer (LC) which could provide new insights into lung carcinogenesis and new biomarkers for disease screening. Clinical studies have suggested that infections with tuberculosis or pneumonia increased the risk of LC possibly through inflammatory or immunological changes. These have now been superseded by genomic-based microbiome sequencing studies based on bronchoalveolar lavage, sputum or saliva samples. Although some discrepancies exist, many have suggested changes in particular bacterial genera in LC samples particularly, Granulicatella, Streptococcus and Veillonella. Granulicatella is of particular interest, as it appeared to show LC stage-specific increases in abundance. We propose that these microbial community changes are likely to reflect biochemical changes in the LC lung, linked to an increase in anaerobic environmental niches and altered pyridoxal/polyamine/nitrogenous metabolism to which Granulicatella could be particularly responsive. These are clearly preliminary observations and many more expansive studies are required to develop our understanding of the LC microbiome. Journal Article ecancermedicalscience 12 17546605 lung cancer, microbiome, Granulicatella, ATP 5 9 2018 2018-09-05 10.3332/ecancer.2018.866 https://ecancer.org/journal/12/full/866-lung-cancer-a-new-frontier-for-microbiome-research-and-clinical-translation.php COLLEGE NANME School of Management COLLEGE CODE SGMGT Swansea University 2018-12-03T12:49:10.3699943 2018-10-30T13:04:40.0177707 School of Management School of Management Luis AJ Mur 1 Sharon A Huws 2 Simon JS Cameron 3 Paul Lewis 4 Keir E Lewis 5 0045296-09112018163408.pdf 45296.pdf 2018-11-09T16:34:08.9370000 Output 589002 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2018-11-08T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY). true eng
title Lung cancer: a new frontier for microbiome research and clinical translation
spellingShingle Lung cancer: a new frontier for microbiome research and clinical translation
Paul, Lewis
title_short Lung cancer: a new frontier for microbiome research and clinical translation
title_full Lung cancer: a new frontier for microbiome research and clinical translation
title_fullStr Lung cancer: a new frontier for microbiome research and clinical translation
title_full_unstemmed Lung cancer: a new frontier for microbiome research and clinical translation
title_sort Lung cancer: a new frontier for microbiome research and clinical translation
author_id_str_mv 46dfc22d7468f247c390ba0c6cd8fba6
author_id_fullname_str_mv 46dfc22d7468f247c390ba0c6cd8fba6_***_Paul, Lewis_***_
author Paul, Lewis
author2 Luis AJ Mur
Sharon A Huws
Simon JS Cameron
Paul Lewis
Keir E Lewis
format Journal article
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publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 17546605
doi_str_mv 10.3332/ecancer.2018.866
college_str School of Management
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url https://ecancer.org/journal/12/full/866-lung-cancer-a-new-frontier-for-microbiome-research-and-clinical-translation.php
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description The lung microbiome has been shown to reflect a range of pulmonary diseases—for example: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis. Studies have now begun to show microbiological changes in the lung that correlate with lung cancer (LC) which could provide new insights into lung carcinogenesis and new biomarkers for disease screening. Clinical studies have suggested that infections with tuberculosis or pneumonia increased the risk of LC possibly through inflammatory or immunological changes. These have now been superseded by genomic-based microbiome sequencing studies based on bronchoalveolar lavage, sputum or saliva samples. Although some discrepancies exist, many have suggested changes in particular bacterial genera in LC samples particularly, Granulicatella, Streptococcus and Veillonella. Granulicatella is of particular interest, as it appeared to show LC stage-specific increases in abundance. We propose that these microbial community changes are likely to reflect biochemical changes in the LC lung, linked to an increase in anaerobic environmental niches and altered pyridoxal/polyamine/nitrogenous metabolism to which Granulicatella could be particularly responsive. These are clearly preliminary observations and many more expansive studies are required to develop our understanding of the LC microbiome.
published_date 2018-09-05T04:11:04Z
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