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“Transcending the World: Wittgenstein, God, and the Usayable"

Mario Von Der Ruhr, Mario Von Der Ruhr

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Swansea University Author: Mario Von Der Ruhr

Abstract

“I know nothing of religion”, Wittgenstein once told his friend Heinrich Groag, “but there is surely something right in the concept of a God and of an after-life – only something quite different from what we are capable of imagining.” The remark is part of a comprehensive spiritual self-assessment o...

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Published: London/Berlin/New York Springer 2012
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa458
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spelling 2014-02-13T10:39:38.0878611 v2 458 2011-10-01 “Transcending the World: Wittgenstein, God, and the Usayable" e96c9a813b1cba0b054131ce4e59f335 Mario Von Der Ruhr Mario Von Der Ruhr true false 2011-10-01 FGHSS “I know nothing of religion”, Wittgenstein once told his friend Heinrich Groag, “but there is surely something right in the concept of a God and of an after-life – only something quite different from what we are capable of imagining.” The remark is part of a comprehensive spiritual self-assessment or credo, at the end of which Wittgenstein has to acknowledge: “I don't have a belief in a salvation through the death of Christ”. At the same time, he expresses the hope that he may come into a relation with God that will sustain him in his work, and continues to invoke God even in his late diaries and correspondence. This paper traces the development of Wittgenstein’s conception of God or ultimate reality from the time of his early Notebooks and the Tractatus to some of his last remarks on God in Culture & Value, so as to render more perspicuous his relation to traditional Christianity, on the one hand, and his attitude towards atheism or secular humanism, on the other. Book chapter 1 Springer London/Berlin/New York Wittgenstein, God, Transcendence, Ethics 31 12 2012 2012-12-31 The paper is part of a collection of (specially commissioned) articles on MODELS OF GOD AND ALTERNATIVE ULTIMATE REALITIES, ed. Jeanine Diller and A. Kasher. The publication is forthcoming late in 2012 or early in 2013. COLLEGE NANME Humanities and Social Sciences - Faculty COLLEGE CODE FGHSS Swansea University 2014-02-13T10:39:38.0878611 2011-10-01T00:00:00.0000000 Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences School of Culture and Communication - Politics, Philosophy and International Relations Mario Von Der Ruhr 1 Mario Von Der Ruhr 2
title “Transcending the World: Wittgenstein, God, and the Usayable"
spellingShingle “Transcending the World: Wittgenstein, God, and the Usayable"
Mario Von Der Ruhr
title_short “Transcending the World: Wittgenstein, God, and the Usayable"
title_full “Transcending the World: Wittgenstein, God, and the Usayable"
title_fullStr “Transcending the World: Wittgenstein, God, and the Usayable"
title_full_unstemmed “Transcending the World: Wittgenstein, God, and the Usayable"
title_sort “Transcending the World: Wittgenstein, God, and the Usayable"
author_id_str_mv e96c9a813b1cba0b054131ce4e59f335
author_id_fullname_str_mv e96c9a813b1cba0b054131ce4e59f335_***_Mario Von Der Ruhr
author Mario Von Der Ruhr
author2 Mario Von Der Ruhr
Mario Von Der Ruhr
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department_str School of Culture and Communication - Politics, Philosophy and International Relations{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences{{{_:::_}}}School of Culture and Communication - Politics, Philosophy and International Relations
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description “I know nothing of religion”, Wittgenstein once told his friend Heinrich Groag, “but there is surely something right in the concept of a God and of an after-life – only something quite different from what we are capable of imagining.” The remark is part of a comprehensive spiritual self-assessment or credo, at the end of which Wittgenstein has to acknowledge: “I don't have a belief in a salvation through the death of Christ”. At the same time, he expresses the hope that he may come into a relation with God that will sustain him in his work, and continues to invoke God even in his late diaries and correspondence. This paper traces the development of Wittgenstein’s conception of God or ultimate reality from the time of his early Notebooks and the Tractatus to some of his last remarks on God in Culture & Value, so as to render more perspicuous his relation to traditional Christianity, on the one hand, and his attitude towards atheism or secular humanism, on the other.
published_date 2012-12-31T03:03:09Z
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