No Cover Image

Journal article 97 views 29 downloads

Mechanical shear stress and leukocyte phenotype and function: Implications for ventricular assist device development and use / Gemma Radley; Sabrina Ali; Ina Laura Pieper; Catherine A Thornton

The International Journal of Artificial Organs, Start page: 039139881881732

Swansea University Author: Thornton, Catherine

Abstract

Heart failure (HF) remains a disease of ever increasing prevalence in the modern world. Patients with end-stage HF are being referred increasingly for mechanical circulatory support (MCS). MCS can assist patients who are ineligible for transplant and stabilise eligible patients prior to transplantat...

Full description

Published in: The International Journal of Artificial Organs
ISSN: 0391-3988 1724-6040
Published: 2018
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa45953
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2018-11-16T20:18:30Z
last_indexed 2019-01-21T14:00:29Z
id cronfa45953
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2019-01-21T11:55:30Z</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>45953</id><entry>2018-11-16</entry><title>Mechanical shear stress and leukocyte phenotype and function: Implications for ventricular assist device development and use</title><alternativeTitle></alternativeTitle><author>Catherine Thornton</author><firstname>Catherine</firstname><surname>Thornton</surname><active>true</active><ORCID>0000-0002-5153-573X</ORCID><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent><sid>c71a7a4be7361094d046d312202bce0c</sid><email>0789291f2bbb8aeb948db2352e425e6a</email><emailaddr>70js5AkMS5jPo3arCUY9c32HZhUyFASdV1DFdgIIhKs=</emailaddr><date>2018-11-16</date><deptcode>PMSC</deptcode><abstract>Heart failure (HF) remains a disease of ever increasing prevalence in the modern world. Patients with end-stage HF are being referred increasingly for mechanical circulatory support (MCS). MCS can assist patients who are ineligible for transplant and stabilise eligible patients prior to transplantation. It is also used during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery to maintain circulation whilst operating on the heart. Whilst MCS can stabilise HF and improve quality of life, complications such as infection and thrombosis remain a common risk. Leukocytes can contribute to both of these complications. Contact with foreign surfaces and the introduction of artificial mechanical shear stress can lead to activation of leukocytes, reduced functionality, and the release of pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombogenic microparticles. Assessing the impact of mechanical trauma to leukocytes is largely overlooked in comparison to red blood cells and platelets. This review provides an overview of the available literature on the effects of in vitro to clinical MCS systems on leukocyte phenotype and function. One purpose of this review is to emphasise the importance of studying mechanical trauma to leukocytes to better understand the occurrence of adverse events during MCS.</abstract><type>Journal article</type><journal>The International Journal of Artificial Organs</journal><volume/><journalNumber/><paginationStart>039139881881732</paginationStart><paginationEnd/><publisher></publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint>0391-3988</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1724-6040</issnElectronic><keywords>Flow cytometry; leukocytes; shear stress; ventricular assist devices</keywords><publishedDay>0</publishedDay><publishedMonth>0</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2018</publishedYear><publishedDate>2018-01-01</publishedDate><doi>10.1177/0391398818817326</doi><url></url><notes></notes><college>Swansea University Medical School</college><department>Medicine</department><CollegeCode>CMED</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>PMSC</DepartmentCode><institution/><researchGroup>Microbes and immunity</researchGroup><supervisor/><sponsorsfunders/><grantnumber/><degreelevel/><degreename>None</degreename><lastEdited>2019-01-21T11:55:30Z</lastEdited><Created>2018-11-16T13:29:56Z</Created><path><level id="1">Swansea University Medical School</level><level id="2">Medicine</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Gemma</firstname><surname>Radley</surname><orcid/><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Sabrina</firstname><surname>Ali</surname><orcid/><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Ina Laura</firstname><surname>Pieper</surname><orcid/><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Catherine A</firstname><surname>Thornton</surname><orcid/><order>4</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0045953-16112018133331.pdf</filename><originalFilename>Thornton_IJAO_review.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2018-11-16T13:33:31Z</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>436599</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>AM</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action>Updated Copyright</action><actionDate>09/01/2019</actionDate><embargoDate>2018-12-26T00:00:00</embargoDate><documentNotes/><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents></rfc1807>
spelling 2019-01-21T11:55:30Z v2 45953 2018-11-16 Mechanical shear stress and leukocyte phenotype and function: Implications for ventricular assist device development and use Catherine Thornton Catherine Thornton true 0000-0002-5153-573X false c71a7a4be7361094d046d312202bce0c 0789291f2bbb8aeb948db2352e425e6a 70js5AkMS5jPo3arCUY9c32HZhUyFASdV1DFdgIIhKs= 2018-11-16 PMSC Heart failure (HF) remains a disease of ever increasing prevalence in the modern world. Patients with end-stage HF are being referred increasingly for mechanical circulatory support (MCS). MCS can assist patients who are ineligible for transplant and stabilise eligible patients prior to transplantation. It is also used during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery to maintain circulation whilst operating on the heart. Whilst MCS can stabilise HF and improve quality of life, complications such as infection and thrombosis remain a common risk. Leukocytes can contribute to both of these complications. Contact with foreign surfaces and the introduction of artificial mechanical shear stress can lead to activation of leukocytes, reduced functionality, and the release of pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombogenic microparticles. Assessing the impact of mechanical trauma to leukocytes is largely overlooked in comparison to red blood cells and platelets. This review provides an overview of the available literature on the effects of in vitro to clinical MCS systems on leukocyte phenotype and function. One purpose of this review is to emphasise the importance of studying mechanical trauma to leukocytes to better understand the occurrence of adverse events during MCS. Journal article The International Journal of Artificial Organs 039139881881732 0391-3988 1724-6040 Flow cytometry; leukocytes; shear stress; ventricular assist devices 0 0 2018 2018-01-01 10.1177/0391398818817326 Swansea University Medical School Medicine CMED PMSC Microbes and immunity None 2019-01-21T11:55:30Z 2018-11-16T13:29:56Z Swansea University Medical School Medicine Gemma Radley 1 Sabrina Ali 2 Ina Laura Pieper 3 Catherine A Thornton 4 0045953-16112018133331.pdf Thornton_IJAO_review.pdf 2018-11-16T13:33:31Z Output 436599 application/pdf AM true Updated Copyright 09/01/2019 2018-12-26T00:00:00 true eng
title Mechanical shear stress and leukocyte phenotype and function: Implications for ventricular assist device development and use
spellingShingle Mechanical shear stress and leukocyte phenotype and function: Implications for ventricular assist device development and use
Thornton, Catherine
title_short Mechanical shear stress and leukocyte phenotype and function: Implications for ventricular assist device development and use
title_full Mechanical shear stress and leukocyte phenotype and function: Implications for ventricular assist device development and use
title_fullStr Mechanical shear stress and leukocyte phenotype and function: Implications for ventricular assist device development and use
title_full_unstemmed Mechanical shear stress and leukocyte phenotype and function: Implications for ventricular assist device development and use
title_sort Mechanical shear stress and leukocyte phenotype and function: Implications for ventricular assist device development and use
author_id_str_mv c71a7a4be7361094d046d312202bce0c
author_id_fullname_str_mv c71a7a4be7361094d046d312202bce0c_***_Thornton, Catherine
author Thornton, Catherine
author2 Gemma Radley
Sabrina Ali
Ina Laura Pieper
Catherine A Thornton
format Journal article
container_title The International Journal of Artificial Organs
container_start_page 039139881881732
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 0391-3988
1724-6040
doi_str_mv 10.1177/0391398818817326
college_str Swansea University Medical School
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_top_title Swansea University Medical School
hierarchy_parent_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_parent_title Swansea University Medical School
department_str Medicine{{{_:::_}}}Swansea University Medical School{{{_:::_}}}Medicine
document_store_str 1
active_str 1
researchgroup_str Microbes and immunity
description Heart failure (HF) remains a disease of ever increasing prevalence in the modern world. Patients with end-stage HF are being referred increasingly for mechanical circulatory support (MCS). MCS can assist patients who are ineligible for transplant and stabilise eligible patients prior to transplantation. It is also used during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery to maintain circulation whilst operating on the heart. Whilst MCS can stabilise HF and improve quality of life, complications such as infection and thrombosis remain a common risk. Leukocytes can contribute to both of these complications. Contact with foreign surfaces and the introduction of artificial mechanical shear stress can lead to activation of leukocytes, reduced functionality, and the release of pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombogenic microparticles. Assessing the impact of mechanical trauma to leukocytes is largely overlooked in comparison to red blood cells and platelets. This review provides an overview of the available literature on the effects of in vitro to clinical MCS systems on leukocyte phenotype and function. One purpose of this review is to emphasise the importance of studying mechanical trauma to leukocytes to better understand the occurrence of adverse events during MCS.
published_date 2018-01-01T16:24:57Z
_version_ 1639591494107004928
score 10.827766