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Including household effects in Big Data research: the experience of building a longitudinal residence algorithm using linked administrative data in Wales / Karen Susan Tingay; Matthew Roberts; Charles B.A. Musselwhite

International Journal of Population Data Science, Volume: 3, Issue: 1

Swansea University Author: Musselwhite, Charles

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Abstract

The effect of the wider social-environment on physical and emotional health has long been an area of study. Extrapolating the impact of the individual’s immediate environment, such as living with a smoker or caring for a chronically-ill child, would potentially reduce confounding effects in health-r...

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Published in: International Journal of Population Data Science
ISSN: 2399-4908
Published: 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa45996
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first_indexed 2018-11-20T14:20:41Z
last_indexed 2019-06-19T14:45:11Z
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spelling 2019-06-19T12:02:45Z v2 45996 2018-11-20 Including household effects in Big Data research: the experience of building a longitudinal residence algorithm using linked administrative data in Wales Charles Musselwhite Charles Musselwhite true 0000-0002-4831-2092 false c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c 75beebc8067424cc969d67472c4466a7 InStp5CuNrzTiXll2RhycFI/4mL4zIy/GXDlPjHD2Zg= 2018-11-20 HIA The effect of the wider social-environment on physical and emotional health has long been an area of study. Extrapolating the impact of the individual’s immediate environment, such as living with a smoker or caring for a chronically-ill child, would potentially reduce confounding effects in health-related research. Surveys, including the UK Census, are beginning to collect data on household composition. However, these surveys are expensive, time consuming, and, as such, are only completed by a subsection of the population. Large-scale, linked databanks, such as the SAIL Databank at Swansea University, which hold routinely collected secondary use clinical and administrative datasets, are broader in scope, both in terms of the nature of the data held, and the population. The SAIL databank includes demographic data and a geographic indicator that makes it possible to identify groups of people that share accommodation, and in some cases the familial relationships among them. This paper describes a method for creating households, including considerations for how that information can be securely shared for research purposes. This approach has broad implications in Wales and beyond, opening up possibilities for more detailed population level research that includes consideration of residential social interactions. Journal article International Journal of Population Data Science 3 1 2399-4908 Big data, household, family, health, dataset, methodology, protocol 20 11 2018 2018-11-20 10.23889/ijpds.v3i1.452 https://ijpds.org/article/view/452 College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing CHHS HIA Swansea University Centre for Innovative Ageing None 2019-06-19T12:02:45Z 2018-11-20T11:26:21Z College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing Karen Susan Tingay 1 Matthew Roberts 2 Charles B.A. Musselwhite 3 0045996-20112018112944.pdf Tingay,RobertsMusselwhite2018.pdf 2018-11-20T11:29:44Z Output 469934 application/pdf VoR true Updated Copyright 12/12/2018 2018-11-20T00:00:00 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. true eng
title Including household effects in Big Data research: the experience of building a longitudinal residence algorithm using linked administrative data in Wales
spellingShingle Including household effects in Big Data research: the experience of building a longitudinal residence algorithm using linked administrative data in Wales
Musselwhite, Charles
title_short Including household effects in Big Data research: the experience of building a longitudinal residence algorithm using linked administrative data in Wales
title_full Including household effects in Big Data research: the experience of building a longitudinal residence algorithm using linked administrative data in Wales
title_fullStr Including household effects in Big Data research: the experience of building a longitudinal residence algorithm using linked administrative data in Wales
title_full_unstemmed Including household effects in Big Data research: the experience of building a longitudinal residence algorithm using linked administrative data in Wales
title_sort Including household effects in Big Data research: the experience of building a longitudinal residence algorithm using linked administrative data in Wales
author_id_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c
author_id_fullname_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c_***_Musselwhite, Charles
author Musselwhite, Charles
author2 Karen Susan Tingay
Matthew Roberts
Charles B.A. Musselwhite
format Journal article
container_title International Journal of Population Data Science
container_volume 3
container_issue 1
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 2399-4908
doi_str_mv 10.23889/ijpds.v3i1.452
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Centre for Innovative Ageing{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Centre for Innovative Ageing
url https://ijpds.org/article/view/452
document_store_str 1
active_str 1
researchgroup_str Centre for Innovative Ageing
description The effect of the wider social-environment on physical and emotional health has long been an area of study. Extrapolating the impact of the individual’s immediate environment, such as living with a smoker or caring for a chronically-ill child, would potentially reduce confounding effects in health-related research. Surveys, including the UK Census, are beginning to collect data on household composition. However, these surveys are expensive, time consuming, and, as such, are only completed by a subsection of the population. Large-scale, linked databanks, such as the SAIL Databank at Swansea University, which hold routinely collected secondary use clinical and administrative datasets, are broader in scope, both in terms of the nature of the data held, and the population. The SAIL databank includes demographic data and a geographic indicator that makes it possible to identify groups of people that share accommodation, and in some cases the familial relationships among them. This paper describes a method for creating households, including considerations for how that information can be securely shared for research purposes. This approach has broad implications in Wales and beyond, opening up possibilities for more detailed population level research that includes consideration of residential social interactions.
published_date 2018-11-20T06:26:20Z
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