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The Consequences of Choking in Sport: A Constructive or Destructive Experience?

Denise Hill Orcid Logo, Matthew Cheesbrough, Paul Gorczynski, Nic Matthews

The Sport Psychologist, Pages: 1 - 37

Swansea University Author: Denise Hill Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1123/tsp.2018-0070

Abstract

Through an empirical phenomenological methodology, the study examined the short- and long-term consequences of choking in sport. Eleven intermediate golfers (10 males, 1 female, aged 23-50 years; M = 34.6; SD = 8.9) with handicaps between 6 and 18 (M = 10.91; SD = 3.98), completed phenomenological i...

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Published in: The Sport Psychologist
ISSN: 0888-4781 1543-2793
Published: 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa46155
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first_indexed 2018-11-29T14:21:07Z
last_indexed 2020-06-16T19:00:01Z
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spelling 2020-06-16T15:58:58.4235181 v2 46155 2018-11-29 The Consequences of Choking in Sport: A Constructive or Destructive Experience? 9bca603dad273604f16acfb1178b1d83 0000-0001-8580-4048 Denise Hill Denise Hill true false 2018-11-29 STSC Through an empirical phenomenological methodology, the study examined the short- and long-term consequences of choking in sport. Eleven intermediate golfers (10 males, 1 female, aged 23-50 years; M = 34.6; SD = 8.9) with handicaps between 6 and 18 (M = 10.91; SD = 3.98), completed phenomenological interviews which explored the perceived psychological impact of their choking episode(s). While the reported short-term consequences were negative (i.e., collapse in performance standards, limited attention/emotional control and negative affect), most participants considered the long-term impact of choking was constructive, for it encouraged adversity-related growth. However, a small number of golfers identified the long-term consequences were highly destructive, including a loss of self-confidence, withdrawal from the sport, and in one case, lowered self-worth. The findings of the study extend the choking literature by informing strategies that can be used to encourage constructive, rather than destructive consequences from any choking episode that athletes may experience. Journal Article The Sport Psychologist 1 37 0888-4781 1543-2793 Performance collapse, reflection, adversity-related growth, learned helplessness. 1 12 2018 2018-12-01 10.1123/tsp.2018-0070 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2020-06-16T15:58:58.4235181 2018-11-29T08:39:17.3606358 College of Engineering Sports Science Denise Hill 0000-0001-8580-4048 1 Matthew Cheesbrough 2 Paul Gorczynski 3 Nic Matthews 4 0046155-29112018084410.pdf ConsequencesofChoking_WithoutAuthor_Final_Pre_Pub_copy.pdf 2018-11-29T08:44:10.1170000 Output 750425 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2018-11-29T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title The Consequences of Choking in Sport: A Constructive or Destructive Experience?
spellingShingle The Consequences of Choking in Sport: A Constructive or Destructive Experience?
Denise Hill
title_short The Consequences of Choking in Sport: A Constructive or Destructive Experience?
title_full The Consequences of Choking in Sport: A Constructive or Destructive Experience?
title_fullStr The Consequences of Choking in Sport: A Constructive or Destructive Experience?
title_full_unstemmed The Consequences of Choking in Sport: A Constructive or Destructive Experience?
title_sort The Consequences of Choking in Sport: A Constructive or Destructive Experience?
author_id_str_mv 9bca603dad273604f16acfb1178b1d83
author_id_fullname_str_mv 9bca603dad273604f16acfb1178b1d83_***_Denise Hill
author Denise Hill
author2 Denise Hill
Matthew Cheesbrough
Paul Gorczynski
Nic Matthews
format Journal article
container_title The Sport Psychologist
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publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 0888-4781
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doi_str_mv 10.1123/tsp.2018-0070
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
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description Through an empirical phenomenological methodology, the study examined the short- and long-term consequences of choking in sport. Eleven intermediate golfers (10 males, 1 female, aged 23-50 years; M = 34.6; SD = 8.9) with handicaps between 6 and 18 (M = 10.91; SD = 3.98), completed phenomenological interviews which explored the perceived psychological impact of their choking episode(s). While the reported short-term consequences were negative (i.e., collapse in performance standards, limited attention/emotional control and negative affect), most participants considered the long-term impact of choking was constructive, for it encouraged adversity-related growth. However, a small number of golfers identified the long-term consequences were highly destructive, including a loss of self-confidence, withdrawal from the sport, and in one case, lowered self-worth. The findings of the study extend the choking literature by informing strategies that can be used to encourage constructive, rather than destructive consequences from any choking episode that athletes may experience.
published_date 2018-12-01T04:00:21Z
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score 10.898751