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Optimism for mitigation of climate warming impacts for sea turtles through nest shading and relocation / Nicole, Esteban

Scientific Reports, Volume: 8, Issue: 1

Swansea University Author: Nicole, Esteban

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Abstract

Increasing incubation temperatures may threaten the viability of sea turtle populations. We explored opportunities for decreasing incubation temperatures at a Caribbean rookery with extreme female-biased hatchling production. To investigate the effect of artificial shading, temperatures were measure...

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Published in: Scientific Reports
ISSN: 2045-2322
Published: 2018
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa47991
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first_indexed 2018-12-18T20:01:23Z
last_indexed 2019-08-30T14:40:08Z
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spelling 2019-08-30T10:08:15.1283208 v2 47991 2018-12-18 Optimism for mitigation of climate warming impacts for sea turtles through nest shading and relocation fb2e760b83b4580e7445092982f1f319 0000-0003-4693-7221 Nicole Esteban Nicole Esteban true false 2018-12-18 SBI Increasing incubation temperatures may threaten the viability of sea turtle populations. We explored opportunities for decreasing incubation temperatures at a Caribbean rookery with extreme female-biased hatchling production. To investigate the effect of artificial shading, temperatures were measured under simple materials (white sheet, white sand, palm leaves). To test natural drivers of incubation temperature, temperatures were measured at average nest depths with shading on two beaches. Results from a pilot experiment suggest the most effective material was palm leaves. Shading decreased temperatures by a mean of 0.60 °C (SE = 0.10 °C, N = 20). Variation between beaches averaged 1.88 °C (SE = 0.13 °C, N = 20). We used long-term rookery data combined with experimental data to estimate the effect on sex ratio: relocation and shading could shift ratios from current ranges (97-100% female) to 60-90% female. A conservation mitigation matrix summarises our evidence that artificial shading and nest relocation are effective conservation strategies to mitigate impacts of climate warming for sea turtles. Journal Article Scientific Reports 8 1 2045-2322 adaptation, Cheloniidae, climate change mitigation, conservation, endangered species, lethal temperatures, temperature-dependant sex determination, reptile 4 12 2018 2018-12-04 10.1038/s41598-018-35821-6 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2019-08-30T10:08:15.1283208 2018-12-18T16:07:25.3115513 Nicole Esteban 0000-0003-4693-7221 1 Jacques-Olivier Laloë 2 Fionne S. P. L. Kiggen 3 Selma M. Ubels 4 Leontine E. Becking 5 Erik H. Meesters 6 Jessica Berkel 7 Graeme C. Hays 8 Marjolijn J. A. Christianen 9 0047991-18122018160923.pdf 47991.pdf 2018-12-18T16:09:23.6000000 Output 1521724 application/pdf Version of Record true 2018-12-17T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY). true eng
title Optimism for mitigation of climate warming impacts for sea turtles through nest shading and relocation
spellingShingle Optimism for mitigation of climate warming impacts for sea turtles through nest shading and relocation
Nicole, Esteban
title_short Optimism for mitigation of climate warming impacts for sea turtles through nest shading and relocation
title_full Optimism for mitigation of climate warming impacts for sea turtles through nest shading and relocation
title_fullStr Optimism for mitigation of climate warming impacts for sea turtles through nest shading and relocation
title_full_unstemmed Optimism for mitigation of climate warming impacts for sea turtles through nest shading and relocation
title_sort Optimism for mitigation of climate warming impacts for sea turtles through nest shading and relocation
author_id_str_mv fb2e760b83b4580e7445092982f1f319
author_id_fullname_str_mv fb2e760b83b4580e7445092982f1f319_***_Nicole, Esteban
author Nicole, Esteban
format Journal article
container_title Scientific Reports
container_volume 8
container_issue 1
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 2045-2322
doi_str_mv 10.1038/s41598-018-35821-6
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Increasing incubation temperatures may threaten the viability of sea turtle populations. We explored opportunities for decreasing incubation temperatures at a Caribbean rookery with extreme female-biased hatchling production. To investigate the effect of artificial shading, temperatures were measured under simple materials (white sheet, white sand, palm leaves). To test natural drivers of incubation temperature, temperatures were measured at average nest depths with shading on two beaches. Results from a pilot experiment suggest the most effective material was palm leaves. Shading decreased temperatures by a mean of 0.60 °C (SE = 0.10 °C, N = 20). Variation between beaches averaged 1.88 °C (SE = 0.13 °C, N = 20). We used long-term rookery data combined with experimental data to estimate the effect on sex ratio: relocation and shading could shift ratios from current ranges (97-100% female) to 60-90% female. A conservation mitigation matrix summarises our evidence that artificial shading and nest relocation are effective conservation strategies to mitigate impacts of climate warming for sea turtles.
published_date 2018-12-04T04:43:40Z
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score 10.885502