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Affective and perceptual responses during reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT)

Preeyaphorn Songsorn, Noel Brick, Ben Fitzpatrick, Sinead Fitzpatrick, Gary McDermott, Conor McClean, Gareth W. Davison, Niels B.J. Vollaard, Richard Metcalfe Orcid Logo

International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, Pages: 1 - 16

Swansea University Author: Richard Metcalfe Orcid Logo

Abstract

We have previously demonstrated that reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) is a genuinely time-efficient exercise strategy for improving cardiometabolic health. Here, we examined the affective and perceptual responses to REHIT. Eight young men and women (age 21 ± 1 y, BMI 24.9 ± ...

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Published in: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
ISSN: 1612-197X 1557-251X
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa48316
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spelling 2019-03-19T09:20:27.8036819 v2 48316 2019-01-21 Affective and perceptual responses during reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf 0000-0003-0980-2977 Richard Metcalfe Richard Metcalfe true false 2019-01-21 STSC We have previously demonstrated that reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) is a genuinely time-efficient exercise strategy for improving cardiometabolic health. Here, we examined the affective and perceptual responses to REHIT. Eight young men and women (age 21 ± 1 y, BMI 24.9 ± 2.1 m/kg2, V̇O2max 39 ± 10 ml/kg/min) and 11 men with type 2 diabetes (T2D; age 52 ± 6 y, BMI 29.7 ± 3.1 m/kg2, V̇O2max 29 ± 5 ml/kg/min) took part in three-arm crossover trials with RPE and affective valence measured during, and enjoyment and exercise preferences measured following either: 1) REHIT (2 × 20-s sprints in a 10-min exercise session), 2) HIIT (10 × 1-min efforts) and 3) 30 min MICT. Furthermore, 19 young men and women (age 25 ± 6 y, BMI 24 ± 4 m/kg2, V̇O2max 34 ± 8 ml/kg/min) completed a 6-week REHIT intervention with affective valence during an acute REHIT session measured before and after training. Affect decreases (briefly) during REHIT, but recovers rapidly, and the decline is not significantly different when compared to MICT or HIIT in either healthy participants or T2D patients. Young sedentary participants reported similar levels of enjoyment for REHIT, MICT and HIIT, but 7 out of 8 had a preference for REHIT. Conversely, T2D patients tended to report lower levels of enjoyment with REHIT compared with MICT. The decrease in affective valence observed during an acute REHIT session was significantly attenuated following training. We conclude that affective and perceptual responses to REHIT are no more negative compared to those associated with MICT or HIIT, refuting claims that supramaximal sprint interval training protocols are associated with inherent negative responses. Journal Article International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology 1 16 1612-197X 1557-251X Exercise. Interval Training. Affect. Perceived Exertion 31 12 2019 2019-12-31 10.1080/1612197X.2019.1593217 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2019-03-19T09:20:27.8036819 2019-01-21T13:59:06.4098928 College of Engineering Sports Science Preeyaphorn Songsorn 1 Noel Brick 2 Ben Fitzpatrick 3 Sinead Fitzpatrick 4 Gary McDermott 5 Conor McClean 6 Gareth W. Davison 7 Niels B.J. Vollaard 8 Richard Metcalfe 0000-0003-0980-2977 9 0048316-21012019140550.pdf Songsorn2019.pdf 2019-01-21T14:05:50.6430000 Output 599086 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2020-03-19T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Affective and perceptual responses during reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT)
spellingShingle Affective and perceptual responses during reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT)
Richard Metcalfe
title_short Affective and perceptual responses during reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT)
title_full Affective and perceptual responses during reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT)
title_fullStr Affective and perceptual responses during reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT)
title_full_unstemmed Affective and perceptual responses during reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT)
title_sort Affective and perceptual responses during reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT)
author_id_str_mv 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf
author_id_fullname_str_mv 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf_***_Richard Metcalfe
author Richard Metcalfe
author2 Preeyaphorn Songsorn
Noel Brick
Ben Fitzpatrick
Sinead Fitzpatrick
Gary McDermott
Conor McClean
Gareth W. Davison
Niels B.J. Vollaard
Richard Metcalfe
format Journal article
container_title International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
container_start_page 1
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 1612-197X
1557-251X
doi_str_mv 10.1080/1612197X.2019.1593217
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
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description We have previously demonstrated that reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) is a genuinely time-efficient exercise strategy for improving cardiometabolic health. Here, we examined the affective and perceptual responses to REHIT. Eight young men and women (age 21 ± 1 y, BMI 24.9 ± 2.1 m/kg2, V̇O2max 39 ± 10 ml/kg/min) and 11 men with type 2 diabetes (T2D; age 52 ± 6 y, BMI 29.7 ± 3.1 m/kg2, V̇O2max 29 ± 5 ml/kg/min) took part in three-arm crossover trials with RPE and affective valence measured during, and enjoyment and exercise preferences measured following either: 1) REHIT (2 × 20-s sprints in a 10-min exercise session), 2) HIIT (10 × 1-min efforts) and 3) 30 min MICT. Furthermore, 19 young men and women (age 25 ± 6 y, BMI 24 ± 4 m/kg2, V̇O2max 34 ± 8 ml/kg/min) completed a 6-week REHIT intervention with affective valence during an acute REHIT session measured before and after training. Affect decreases (briefly) during REHIT, but recovers rapidly, and the decline is not significantly different when compared to MICT or HIIT in either healthy participants or T2D patients. Young sedentary participants reported similar levels of enjoyment for REHIT, MICT and HIIT, but 7 out of 8 had a preference for REHIT. Conversely, T2D patients tended to report lower levels of enjoyment with REHIT compared with MICT. The decrease in affective valence observed during an acute REHIT session was significantly attenuated following training. We conclude that affective and perceptual responses to REHIT are no more negative compared to those associated with MICT or HIIT, refuting claims that supramaximal sprint interval training protocols are associated with inherent negative responses.
published_date 2019-12-31T04:20:12Z
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