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Understanding Youths’ Ability to Interpret 3D-Printed Physical Activity Data and Identify Associated Intensity Levels: Mixed-Methods Study / Sam Graeme Morgan Crossley, Melitta McNarry, Michael Rosenberg, Zoe R Knowles, Parisa Eslambolchilar, Kelly Mackintosh

Journal of Medical Internet Research, Volume: 21, Issue: 2, Start page: e11253

Swansea University Authors: Melitta McNarry, Kelly Mackintosh

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DOI (Published version): 10.2196/11253

Abstract

Background: A significant proportion of youth in the United Kingdom fail to meet the recommended 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity every day. One of the major barriers encountered in achieving these physical activity recommendations is the perceived difficulty for youths to interp...

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Published in: Journal of Medical Internet Research
ISSN: 1438-8871
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa49127
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2019-04-08T11:41:04.4483507</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>49127</id><entry>2019-03-06</entry><title>Understanding Youths&#x2019; Ability to Interpret 3D-Printed Physical Activity Data and Identify Associated Intensity Levels: Mixed-Methods Study</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-0813-7477</ORCID><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><name>Melitta McNarry</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-0355-6357</ORCID><firstname>Kelly</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><name>Kelly Mackintosh</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2019-03-06</date><deptcode>STSC</deptcode><abstract>Background: A significant proportion of youth in the United Kingdom fail to meet the recommended 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity every day. One of the major barriers encountered in achieving these physical activity recommendations is the perceived difficulty for youths to interpret physical activity intensity levels and apply them to everyday activities. Personalized physical activity feedback is an important method to educate youths about behaviors and associated outcomes. Recent advances in 3D printing have enabled novel ways of representing physical activity levels through personalized tangible feedback to enhance youths&#x2019; understanding of concepts and make data more available in the everyday physical environment rather than on screen.Objective: The purpose of this research was to elicit youths&#x2019; (children and adolescents) interpretations of two age-specific 3D models displaying physical activity and to assess their ability to appropriately align activities to the respective intensity.Methods: Twelve primary school children (9 boys; mean age 7.8 years; SD 0.4 years) and 12 secondary school adolescents (6 boys; mean age 14.1 years; SD 0.3 years) participated in individual semistructured interviews. Interview questions, in combination with two interactive tasks, focused on youths&#x2019; ability to correctly identify physical activity intensities and interpret an age-specific 3D model. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, content was analyzed, and outcomes were represented via tables and diagrammatic pen profiles.Results: Youths, irrespective of age, demonstrated a poor ability to define moderate-intensity activities. Moreover, children and adolescents demonstrated difficulty in correctly identifying light- and vigorous-intensity activities, respectively. Although youths were able to correctly interpret different components of the age-specific 3D models, children struggled to differentiate physical activity intensities represented in the models.Conclusions: These findings support the potential use of age-specific 3D models of physical activity to enhance youths&#x2019; understanding of the recommended guidelines and associated intensities.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Journal of Medical Internet Research</journal><volume>21</volume><journalNumber>2</journalNumber><paginationStart>e11253</paginationStart><publisher/><issnElectronic>1438-8871</issnElectronic><keywords/><publishedDay>28</publishedDay><publishedMonth>2</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2019</publishedYear><publishedDate>2019-02-28</publishedDate><doi>10.2196/11253</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Sport and Exercise Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>STSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2019-04-08T11:41:04.4483507</lastEdited><Created>2019-03-06T11:33:37.0158296</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Sports Science</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Sam Graeme Morgan</firstname><surname>Crossley</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0813-7477</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Michael</firstname><surname>Rosenberg</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Zoe R</firstname><surname>Knowles</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Parisa</firstname><surname>Eslambolchilar</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Kelly</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0355-6357</orcid><order>6</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0049127-06032019113808.pdf</filename><originalFilename>crossley2019(2).pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2019-03-06T11:38:08.3800000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>13188423</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><embargoDate>2019-03-06T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2019-04-08T11:41:04.4483507 v2 49127 2019-03-06 Understanding Youths’ Ability to Interpret 3D-Printed Physical Activity Data and Identify Associated Intensity Levels: Mixed-Methods Study 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214 0000-0003-0355-6357 Kelly Mackintosh Kelly Mackintosh true false 2019-03-06 STSC Background: A significant proportion of youth in the United Kingdom fail to meet the recommended 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity every day. One of the major barriers encountered in achieving these physical activity recommendations is the perceived difficulty for youths to interpret physical activity intensity levels and apply them to everyday activities. Personalized physical activity feedback is an important method to educate youths about behaviors and associated outcomes. Recent advances in 3D printing have enabled novel ways of representing physical activity levels through personalized tangible feedback to enhance youths’ understanding of concepts and make data more available in the everyday physical environment rather than on screen.Objective: The purpose of this research was to elicit youths’ (children and adolescents) interpretations of two age-specific 3D models displaying physical activity and to assess their ability to appropriately align activities to the respective intensity.Methods: Twelve primary school children (9 boys; mean age 7.8 years; SD 0.4 years) and 12 secondary school adolescents (6 boys; mean age 14.1 years; SD 0.3 years) participated in individual semistructured interviews. Interview questions, in combination with two interactive tasks, focused on youths’ ability to correctly identify physical activity intensities and interpret an age-specific 3D model. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, content was analyzed, and outcomes were represented via tables and diagrammatic pen profiles.Results: Youths, irrespective of age, demonstrated a poor ability to define moderate-intensity activities. Moreover, children and adolescents demonstrated difficulty in correctly identifying light- and vigorous-intensity activities, respectively. Although youths were able to correctly interpret different components of the age-specific 3D models, children struggled to differentiate physical activity intensities represented in the models.Conclusions: These findings support the potential use of age-specific 3D models of physical activity to enhance youths’ understanding of the recommended guidelines and associated intensities. Journal Article Journal of Medical Internet Research 21 2 e11253 1438-8871 28 2 2019 2019-02-28 10.2196/11253 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2019-04-08T11:41:04.4483507 2019-03-06T11:33:37.0158296 College of Engineering Sports Science Sam Graeme Morgan Crossley 1 Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 2 Michael Rosenberg 3 Zoe R Knowles 4 Parisa Eslambolchilar 5 Kelly Mackintosh 0000-0003-0355-6357 6 0049127-06032019113808.pdf crossley2019(2).pdf 2019-03-06T11:38:08.3800000 Output 13188423 application/pdf Version of Record true 2019-03-06T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Understanding Youths’ Ability to Interpret 3D-Printed Physical Activity Data and Identify Associated Intensity Levels: Mixed-Methods Study
spellingShingle Understanding Youths’ Ability to Interpret 3D-Printed Physical Activity Data and Identify Associated Intensity Levels: Mixed-Methods Study
Melitta, McNarry
Kelly, Mackintosh
title_short Understanding Youths’ Ability to Interpret 3D-Printed Physical Activity Data and Identify Associated Intensity Levels: Mixed-Methods Study
title_full Understanding Youths’ Ability to Interpret 3D-Printed Physical Activity Data and Identify Associated Intensity Levels: Mixed-Methods Study
title_fullStr Understanding Youths’ Ability to Interpret 3D-Printed Physical Activity Data and Identify Associated Intensity Levels: Mixed-Methods Study
title_full_unstemmed Understanding Youths’ Ability to Interpret 3D-Printed Physical Activity Data and Identify Associated Intensity Levels: Mixed-Methods Study
title_sort Understanding Youths’ Ability to Interpret 3D-Printed Physical Activity Data and Identify Associated Intensity Levels: Mixed-Methods Study
author_id_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214
author_id_fullname_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta, McNarry
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214_***_Kelly, Mackintosh
author Melitta, McNarry
Kelly, Mackintosh
author2 Sam Graeme Morgan Crossley
Melitta McNarry
Michael Rosenberg
Zoe R Knowles
Parisa Eslambolchilar
Kelly Mackintosh
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
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description Background: A significant proportion of youth in the United Kingdom fail to meet the recommended 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity every day. One of the major barriers encountered in achieving these physical activity recommendations is the perceived difficulty for youths to interpret physical activity intensity levels and apply them to everyday activities. Personalized physical activity feedback is an important method to educate youths about behaviors and associated outcomes. Recent advances in 3D printing have enabled novel ways of representing physical activity levels through personalized tangible feedback to enhance youths’ understanding of concepts and make data more available in the everyday physical environment rather than on screen.Objective: The purpose of this research was to elicit youths’ (children and adolescents) interpretations of two age-specific 3D models displaying physical activity and to assess their ability to appropriately align activities to the respective intensity.Methods: Twelve primary school children (9 boys; mean age 7.8 years; SD 0.4 years) and 12 secondary school adolescents (6 boys; mean age 14.1 years; SD 0.3 years) participated in individual semistructured interviews. Interview questions, in combination with two interactive tasks, focused on youths’ ability to correctly identify physical activity intensities and interpret an age-specific 3D model. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, content was analyzed, and outcomes were represented via tables and diagrammatic pen profiles.Results: Youths, irrespective of age, demonstrated a poor ability to define moderate-intensity activities. Moreover, children and adolescents demonstrated difficulty in correctly identifying light- and vigorous-intensity activities, respectively. Although youths were able to correctly interpret different components of the age-specific 3D models, children struggled to differentiate physical activity intensities represented in the models.Conclusions: These findings support the potential use of age-specific 3D models of physical activity to enhance youths’ understanding of the recommended guidelines and associated intensities.
published_date 2019-02-28T04:08:19Z
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