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The bumpy road of home states’ regulation of globalised businesses – legal and institutional disruptions to supply chain disclosure under the modern slavery act / Shuangge Wen, Jingchen Zhao

Catholic University Law Review, Volume: 69, Issue: 1, Pages: 125 - 162

Swansea University Author: Shuangge Wen

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Abstract

In response to the paradigm shift from territorial corporations to global businesses and supply chains, States are increasingly engaging in regulating extraterritorial business activities, supply chain disclosure regulation being a primary example. Much ink has thus far spilled on the intrinsic doct...

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Published in: Catholic University Law Review
ISSN: 0008-8390
Published: 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa49611
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first_indexed 2019-03-19T13:59:04Z
last_indexed 2021-09-07T03:09:31Z
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spelling 2021-09-06T10:24:45.3013235 v2 49611 2019-03-19 The bumpy road of home states’ regulation of globalised businesses – legal and institutional disruptions to supply chain disclosure under the modern slavery act 74b83f19a26c4aca40456680a19b7f1e 0000-0003-0574-7288 Shuangge Wen Shuangge Wen true false 2019-03-19 LAWD In response to the paradigm shift from territorial corporations to global businesses and supply chains, States are increasingly engaging in regulating extraterritorial business activities, supply chain disclosure regulation being a primary example. Much ink has thus far spilled on the intrinsic doctrinal and conceptual aspects of this regulatory approach, with its interactions to the external regulatory and institutional environment explored far less to date. This article seeks to correct the scholarly imbalance by critically examining how s.54 of the UK Modern Slavery Act (MSA) – a prominent attempt among state-level initiatives designed to promote human rights protection within global supply chains – fits with other extraterritorial initiatives and the broad supply chain environment in which it operates. An exploration of the likely disruptive effects on the enforcement of supply chain disclosure regulation follows thereafter. The paper intends to bring to light the doctrinal, contextual and practical complexities faced by current home-state lawmaking endeavours, in the hope of generating further insights into the intricate but significant issue of imposing human rights responsibilities on globalised businesses. Journal Article Catholic University Law Review 69 1 125 162 0008-8390 22 5 2020 2020-05-22 Open Access Journal link via https://scholarship.law.edu/lawreview/vol69/iss1/9/ COLLEGE NANME Law COLLEGE CODE LAWD Swansea University Department of Education, Jilin Province, China;Nottingham Trent University 2021-09-06T10:24:45.3013235 2019-03-19T07:04:39.3721511 Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law Law Shuangge Wen 0000-0003-0574-7288 1 Jingchen Zhao 2 49611__13431__e470bf7876e3418f81196674b79c9f97.pdf 49611.pdf 2019-04-09T12:28:26.8800000 Output 403769 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true This Article is brought to you for free and open access by CUA Law Scholarship Repository as part of the Digital Commons Network. true eng
title The bumpy road of home states’ regulation of globalised businesses – legal and institutional disruptions to supply chain disclosure under the modern slavery act
spellingShingle The bumpy road of home states’ regulation of globalised businesses – legal and institutional disruptions to supply chain disclosure under the modern slavery act
Shuangge, Wen
title_short The bumpy road of home states’ regulation of globalised businesses – legal and institutional disruptions to supply chain disclosure under the modern slavery act
title_full The bumpy road of home states’ regulation of globalised businesses – legal and institutional disruptions to supply chain disclosure under the modern slavery act
title_fullStr The bumpy road of home states’ regulation of globalised businesses – legal and institutional disruptions to supply chain disclosure under the modern slavery act
title_full_unstemmed The bumpy road of home states’ regulation of globalised businesses – legal and institutional disruptions to supply chain disclosure under the modern slavery act
title_sort The bumpy road of home states’ regulation of globalised businesses – legal and institutional disruptions to supply chain disclosure under the modern slavery act
author_id_str_mv 74b83f19a26c4aca40456680a19b7f1e
author_id_fullname_str_mv 74b83f19a26c4aca40456680a19b7f1e_***_Shuangge, Wen
author Shuangge, Wen
author2 Shuangge Wen
Jingchen Zhao
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description In response to the paradigm shift from territorial corporations to global businesses and supply chains, States are increasingly engaging in regulating extraterritorial business activities, supply chain disclosure regulation being a primary example. Much ink has thus far spilled on the intrinsic doctrinal and conceptual aspects of this regulatory approach, with its interactions to the external regulatory and institutional environment explored far less to date. This article seeks to correct the scholarly imbalance by critically examining how s.54 of the UK Modern Slavery Act (MSA) – a prominent attempt among state-level initiatives designed to promote human rights protection within global supply chains – fits with other extraterritorial initiatives and the broad supply chain environment in which it operates. An exploration of the likely disruptive effects on the enforcement of supply chain disclosure regulation follows thereafter. The paper intends to bring to light the doctrinal, contextual and practical complexities faced by current home-state lawmaking endeavours, in the hope of generating further insights into the intricate but significant issue of imposing human rights responsibilities on globalised businesses.
published_date 2020-05-22T04:08:47Z
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