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Characterising the fatigue performance of additive materials using the small punch test

David Lewis, Robert Lancaster Orcid Logo, Spencer Jeffs Orcid Logo, Henry Illsley, S.J. Davies, G.J. Baxter

Materials Science and Engineering: A, Volume: 754, Pages: 719 - 727

Swansea University Authors: David Lewis , Robert Lancaster Orcid Logo, Spencer Jeffs Orcid Logo, Henry Illsley

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Abstract

In recent years the use of Additive Manufacturing (AM) has become increasingly widespread with numerous industries now moving towards large scale manufacture of structurally integral components. The nature of AM offers the ability to manufacture more complex and optimised geometries, such as cooling...

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Published in: Materials Science and Engineering: A
ISSN: 0921-5093
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa49774
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spelling 2021-01-15T10:26:33.6064815 v2 49774 2019-03-27 Characterising the fatigue performance of additive materials using the small punch test f52973928db300e06885ef9aabde1d63 David Lewis David Lewis true false e1a1b126acd3e4ff734691ec34967f29 0000-0002-1365-6944 Robert Lancaster Robert Lancaster true false 6ff76d567df079d8bf299990849c3d8f 0000-0002-2819-9651 Spencer Jeffs Spencer Jeffs true false c6c06ae7759a8ec545aef99c275c3bf5 Henry Illsley Henry Illsley true false 2019-03-27 In recent years the use of Additive Manufacturing (AM) has become increasingly widespread with numerous industries now moving towards large scale manufacture of structurally integral components. The nature of AM offers the ability to manufacture more complex and optimised geometries, such as cooling channels and honeycomb structures, which would not be possible or economically viable to manufacture using more traditional fabrication processes. However, the layer by layer build structure of AM components also introduces a complex and component specific microstructure arising from the rapid cooling rates resulting from the build parameters and geometries, which hence influence the mechanical properties. Therefore, the use of conventional mechanical test approaches to assess the performance of these materials can be limited. This paper will extend upon some of the recent research at Swansea University in applying the innovative small punch fatigue (SPF) experiment to characterise the mechanical performance of AM materials and how they compare to traditionally manufactured variants of the same alloys. Results show excellent agreement with the microstructural morphologies of the different materials, with supporting fractography evidencing the contrasting failure modes. Journal Article Materials Science and Engineering: A 754 719 727 0921-5093 Additive manufacturing, Small punch, Fatigue, Titanium alloys, Nickel based superalloys 1 4 2019 2019-04-01 10.1016/j.msea.2019.03.115 COLLEGE NANME COLLEGE CODE Swansea University UKRI, EP/H022309/1 2021-01-15T10:26:33.6064815 2019-03-27T14:16:27.9416279 College of Engineering Engineering David Lewis 1 Robert Lancaster 0000-0002-1365-6944 2 Spencer Jeffs 0000-0002-2819-9651 3 Henry Illsley 4 S.J. Davies 5 G.J. Baxter 6 0049774-20042019134424.pdf APCF002.49774.pdf 2019-04-20T13:44:24.4870000 Output 3714374 application/pdf Version of Record true Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY). true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Characterising the fatigue performance of additive materials using the small punch test
spellingShingle Characterising the fatigue performance of additive materials using the small punch test
David, Lewis
Robert, Lancaster
Spencer, Jeffs
Henry, Illsley
title_short Characterising the fatigue performance of additive materials using the small punch test
title_full Characterising the fatigue performance of additive materials using the small punch test
title_fullStr Characterising the fatigue performance of additive materials using the small punch test
title_full_unstemmed Characterising the fatigue performance of additive materials using the small punch test
title_sort Characterising the fatigue performance of additive materials using the small punch test
author_id_str_mv f52973928db300e06885ef9aabde1d63
e1a1b126acd3e4ff734691ec34967f29
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c6c06ae7759a8ec545aef99c275c3bf5
author_id_fullname_str_mv f52973928db300e06885ef9aabde1d63_***_David, Lewis_***_
e1a1b126acd3e4ff734691ec34967f29_***_Robert, Lancaster_***_0000-0002-1365-6944
6ff76d567df079d8bf299990849c3d8f_***_Spencer, Jeffs_***_0000-0002-2819-9651
c6c06ae7759a8ec545aef99c275c3bf5_***_Henry, Illsley_***_
author David, Lewis
Robert, Lancaster
Spencer, Jeffs
Henry, Illsley
author2 David Lewis
Robert Lancaster
Spencer Jeffs
Henry Illsley
S.J. Davies
G.J. Baxter
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container_title Materials Science and Engineering: A
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publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 0921-5093
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.msea.2019.03.115
college_str College of Engineering
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description In recent years the use of Additive Manufacturing (AM) has become increasingly widespread with numerous industries now moving towards large scale manufacture of structurally integral components. The nature of AM offers the ability to manufacture more complex and optimised geometries, such as cooling channels and honeycomb structures, which would not be possible or economically viable to manufacture using more traditional fabrication processes. However, the layer by layer build structure of AM components also introduces a complex and component specific microstructure arising from the rapid cooling rates resulting from the build parameters and geometries, which hence influence the mechanical properties. Therefore, the use of conventional mechanical test approaches to assess the performance of these materials can be limited. This paper will extend upon some of the recent research at Swansea University in applying the innovative small punch fatigue (SPF) experiment to characterise the mechanical performance of AM materials and how they compare to traditionally manufactured variants of the same alloys. Results show excellent agreement with the microstructural morphologies of the different materials, with supporting fractography evidencing the contrasting failure modes.
published_date 2019-04-01T04:12:58Z
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