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Understanding What Has Been Happening to the Public‐Sector Pay Premium in Great Britain: A Distributional Approach Based on the Labour Force Survey / Phil Murphy; David Blackaby; Nigel O'Leary; Anita Staneva

British Journal of Industrial Relations, Volume: 58, Issue: 2, Pages: 273 - 300

Swansea University Authors: Phil, Murphy, David, Blackaby, Nigel, O'Leary

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/bjir.12474

Abstract

This paper investigates what has been happening to the public sector wage differential in GB over the period 1994 to 2017. The evidence indicates that apart from men in the lower part of the pay distribution the public sector pay premium has declined for all public sector workers. This decline has c...

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Published in: British Journal of Industrial Relations
ISSN: 0007-1080 1467-8543
Published: 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa50294
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first_indexed 2019-05-09T20:01:27Z
last_indexed 2021-01-20T04:12:01Z
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spelling 2021-01-19T11:22:02.2411373 v2 50294 2019-05-09 Understanding What Has Been Happening to the Public‐Sector Pay Premium in Great Britain: A Distributional Approach Based on the Labour Force Survey 1bc1c36543ccfdf7ed46370cf63e7369 Phil Murphy Phil Murphy true false 5b6a72a296cd534a451b536138325251 David Blackaby David Blackaby true false fb1a5569008b44e42a4c63a3f971bd29 0000-0002-5971-9306 Nigel O'Leary Nigel O'Leary true false 2019-05-09 This paper investigates what has been happening to the public sector wage differential in GB over the period 1994 to 2017. The evidence indicates that apart from men in the lower part of the pay distribution the public sector pay premium has declined for all public sector workers. This decline has coincided with a decline in the overall pay-gap, which is associated with changes in the composition of public and private sector workforces. As the relative pay disadvantage experienced by public sector workers at the top of the pay distribution has got worse overtime this must raise serious concerns about the ability of the public sector to recruit and retain the staff it needs to deliver public services. Journal Article British Journal of Industrial Relations 58 2 273 300 0007-1080 1467-8543 1 6 2020 2020-06-01 10.1111/bjir.12474 COLLEGE NANME COLLEGE CODE Swansea University 2021-01-19T11:22:02.2411373 2019-05-09T10:43:18.5900974 Phil Murphy 1 David Blackaby 2 Nigel O'Leary 0000-0002-5971-9306 3 Anita Staneva 4 0050294-14062019151430.pdf 50294v2.pdf 2019-06-14T15:14:30.5070000 Output 941326 application/pdf Version of Record true 2019-06-10T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY). true eng
title Understanding What Has Been Happening to the Public‐Sector Pay Premium in Great Britain: A Distributional Approach Based on the Labour Force Survey
spellingShingle Understanding What Has Been Happening to the Public‐Sector Pay Premium in Great Britain: A Distributional Approach Based on the Labour Force Survey
Phil, Murphy
David, Blackaby
Nigel, O'Leary
title_short Understanding What Has Been Happening to the Public‐Sector Pay Premium in Great Britain: A Distributional Approach Based on the Labour Force Survey
title_full Understanding What Has Been Happening to the Public‐Sector Pay Premium in Great Britain: A Distributional Approach Based on the Labour Force Survey
title_fullStr Understanding What Has Been Happening to the Public‐Sector Pay Premium in Great Britain: A Distributional Approach Based on the Labour Force Survey
title_full_unstemmed Understanding What Has Been Happening to the Public‐Sector Pay Premium in Great Britain: A Distributional Approach Based on the Labour Force Survey
title_sort Understanding What Has Been Happening to the Public‐Sector Pay Premium in Great Britain: A Distributional Approach Based on the Labour Force Survey
author_id_str_mv 1bc1c36543ccfdf7ed46370cf63e7369
5b6a72a296cd534a451b536138325251
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author_id_fullname_str_mv 1bc1c36543ccfdf7ed46370cf63e7369_***_Phil, Murphy
5b6a72a296cd534a451b536138325251_***_David, Blackaby
fb1a5569008b44e42a4c63a3f971bd29_***_Nigel, O'Leary
author Phil, Murphy
David, Blackaby
Nigel, O'Leary
author2 Phil Murphy
David Blackaby
Nigel O'Leary
Anita Staneva
format Journal article
container_title British Journal of Industrial Relations
container_volume 58
container_issue 2
container_start_page 273
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 0007-1080
1467-8543
doi_str_mv 10.1111/bjir.12474
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description This paper investigates what has been happening to the public sector wage differential in GB over the period 1994 to 2017. The evidence indicates that apart from men in the lower part of the pay distribution the public sector pay premium has declined for all public sector workers. This decline has coincided with a decline in the overall pay-gap, which is associated with changes in the composition of public and private sector workforces. As the relative pay disadvantage experienced by public sector workers at the top of the pay distribution has got worse overtime this must raise serious concerns about the ability of the public sector to recruit and retain the staff it needs to deliver public services.
published_date 2020-06-01T04:18:53Z
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score 10.801289