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Re-evaluating post-conviction disclosure: A case for ‘better late than never’ / Holly, Greenwood

International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice

Swansea University Author: Holly, Greenwood

  • Accepted Manuscript under embargo until: 1st December 2020

Abstract

This article contends that the legal position regarding the scope of post-conviction disclosure duties ought to be revisited. First, it will discuss the leading Supreme Court case on this issue Nunn v Chief Constable of Suffolk Police and will argue that the decision warrants reconsideration as it i...

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Published in: International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice
ISSN: 17560616
Published: 2019
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa50369
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first_indexed 2019-05-20T11:26:29Z
last_indexed 2019-06-07T14:57:14Z
id cronfa50369
recordtype SURis
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spelling 2019-06-07T12:36:58.2969612 v2 50369 2019-05-14 Re-evaluating post-conviction disclosure: A case for ‘better late than never’ e305dd490b12881383f3a5fefa3a1e72 0000-0002-4485-6527 Holly Greenwood Holly Greenwood true false 2019-05-14 LAWD This article contends that the legal position regarding the scope of post-conviction disclosure duties ought to be revisited. First, it will discuss the leading Supreme Court case on this issue Nunn v Chief Constable of Suffolk Police and will argue that the decision warrants reconsideration as it is grounded in flawed assumptions that cannot be sustained. Second, it will make the case for strengthening the rights of defendants to access material post-trial, particularly in a climate of austerity where more defendants are relying on university projects and other charitable organisations to assist them in appealing against their conviction. Third, the article will suggest that consideration is given to proposals in an ‘Open Justice Charter’ to promote fairness and transparency in the criminal justice system and, furthermore, will suggest that an independent disclosure agency ought to be established to deal with criminal disclosure issues pre and post-trial. Journal Article International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice 17560616 Criminal disclosure; post-conviction disclosure; miscarriages of justice; innocence projects 1 6 2019 2019-06-01 10.1016/j.ijlcj.2019.05.001 COLLEGE NANME Legal Studies COLLEGE CODE LAWD Swansea University 2019-06-07T12:36:58.2969612 2019-05-14T11:45:20.9592110 Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law Legal Studies Holly Greenwood 0000-0002-4485-6527 1 Dennis Eady 2 Under embargo Under embargo 2019-05-15T08:48:02.4030000 Output 416156 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2020-12-01T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License (CC-BY-NC-ND). true eng
title Re-evaluating post-conviction disclosure: A case for ‘better late than never’
spellingShingle Re-evaluating post-conviction disclosure: A case for ‘better late than never’
Holly, Greenwood
title_short Re-evaluating post-conviction disclosure: A case for ‘better late than never’
title_full Re-evaluating post-conviction disclosure: A case for ‘better late than never’
title_fullStr Re-evaluating post-conviction disclosure: A case for ‘better late than never’
title_full_unstemmed Re-evaluating post-conviction disclosure: A case for ‘better late than never’
title_sort Re-evaluating post-conviction disclosure: A case for ‘better late than never’
author_id_str_mv e305dd490b12881383f3a5fefa3a1e72
author_id_fullname_str_mv e305dd490b12881383f3a5fefa3a1e72_***_Holly, Greenwood
author Holly, Greenwood
format Journal article
container_title International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 17560616
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.ijlcj.2019.05.001
college_str Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
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hierarchy_top_title Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
hierarchy_parent_id hillaryrodhamclintonschooloflaw
hierarchy_parent_title Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
department_str Legal Studies{{{_:::_}}}Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law{{{_:::_}}}Legal Studies
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description This article contends that the legal position regarding the scope of post-conviction disclosure duties ought to be revisited. First, it will discuss the leading Supreme Court case on this issue Nunn v Chief Constable of Suffolk Police and will argue that the decision warrants reconsideration as it is grounded in flawed assumptions that cannot be sustained. Second, it will make the case for strengthening the rights of defendants to access material post-trial, particularly in a climate of austerity where more defendants are relying on university projects and other charitable organisations to assist them in appealing against their conviction. Third, the article will suggest that consideration is given to proposals in an ‘Open Justice Charter’ to promote fairness and transparency in the criminal justice system and, furthermore, will suggest that an independent disclosure agency ought to be established to deal with criminal disclosure issues pre and post-trial.
published_date 2019-06-01T04:10:53Z
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