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Wind prevents cliff-breeding birds from accessing nests through loss of flight control

Emily Shepard Orcid Logo, Emma-Louise Cole, Andrew Neate, Emmanouil Lempidakis, Andrew Ross

eLife, Volume: 8

Swansea University Authors: Emily Shepard Orcid Logo, Andrew Neate

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DOI (Published version): 10.7554/eLife.43842

Abstract

For fast-flying birds, the ability to respond to wind during landing is critical, as errors can lead to injury or even death. Nonetheless, landing ability, and its ecological significance, remain unstudied. We show that for auks, 60% of attempts to land at their cliff nests fail in a strong breeze (...

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Published in: eLife
ISSN: 2050-084X
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa50481
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first_indexed 2019-06-05T11:07:35Z
last_indexed 2019-08-30T14:46:00Z
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spelling 2019-08-30T10:26:31.1821301 v2 50481 2019-05-22 Wind prevents cliff-breeding birds from accessing nests through loss of flight control 54729295145aa1ea56d176818d51ed6a 0000-0001-7325-6398 Emily Shepard Emily Shepard true false 9d42d20aba1cff6eaf507ea6f0134868 Andrew Neate Andrew Neate true false 2019-05-22 SBI For fast-flying birds, the ability to respond to wind during landing is critical, as errors can lead to injury or even death. Nonetheless, landing ability, and its ecological significance, remain unstudied. We show that for auks, 60% of attempts to land at their cliff nests fail in a strong breeze (80% in near-gale winds). This is most likely because wind interferes with the ability to maintain flight control in the last phase of landing. Their extreme flight costs mean that the energetic penalty for multiple landing attempts is high. We propose that exposure, and ability to respond to, such conditions will influence the suitability of breeding habitat. In support of this (i) auk colonies appear to be orientated away from prevailing winds and (ii) landing success within colonies is higher on crowded ledges with more airspace for manoeuvring. More generally, the interplay between wind and flight capacities could impact breeding distributions across species and scales. Journal Article eLife 8 2050-084X Wind, central place, seabird, flight control, manoeuvrability, aeroecology, auk, movement ecology 12 6 2019 2019-06-12 10.7554/eLife.43842 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2019-08-30T10:26:31.1821301 2019-05-22T11:28:28.7224401 College of Science Biosciences Emily Shepard 0000-0001-7325-6398 1 Emma-Louise Cole 2 Andrew Neate 3 Emmanouil Lempidakis 4 Andrew Ross 5 0050481-24062019102047.pdf 50481.pdf 2019-06-24T10:20:47.2770000 Output 984639 application/pdf Version of Record true 2019-06-23T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY). true eng
title Wind prevents cliff-breeding birds from accessing nests through loss of flight control
spellingShingle Wind prevents cliff-breeding birds from accessing nests through loss of flight control
Emily Shepard
Andrew Neate
title_short Wind prevents cliff-breeding birds from accessing nests through loss of flight control
title_full Wind prevents cliff-breeding birds from accessing nests through loss of flight control
title_fullStr Wind prevents cliff-breeding birds from accessing nests through loss of flight control
title_full_unstemmed Wind prevents cliff-breeding birds from accessing nests through loss of flight control
title_sort Wind prevents cliff-breeding birds from accessing nests through loss of flight control
author_id_str_mv 54729295145aa1ea56d176818d51ed6a
9d42d20aba1cff6eaf507ea6f0134868
author_id_fullname_str_mv 54729295145aa1ea56d176818d51ed6a_***_Emily Shepard
9d42d20aba1cff6eaf507ea6f0134868_***_Andrew Neate
author Emily Shepard
Andrew Neate
author2 Emily Shepard
Emma-Louise Cole
Andrew Neate
Emmanouil Lempidakis
Andrew Ross
format Journal article
container_title eLife
container_volume 8
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 2050-084X
doi_str_mv 10.7554/eLife.43842
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description For fast-flying birds, the ability to respond to wind during landing is critical, as errors can lead to injury or even death. Nonetheless, landing ability, and its ecological significance, remain unstudied. We show that for auks, 60% of attempts to land at their cliff nests fail in a strong breeze (80% in near-gale winds). This is most likely because wind interferes with the ability to maintain flight control in the last phase of landing. Their extreme flight costs mean that the energetic penalty for multiple landing attempts is high. We propose that exposure, and ability to respond to, such conditions will influence the suitability of breeding habitat. In support of this (i) auk colonies appear to be orientated away from prevailing winds and (ii) landing success within colonies is higher on crowded ledges with more airspace for manoeuvring. More generally, the interplay between wind and flight capacities could impact breeding distributions across species and scales.
published_date 2019-06-12T04:03:52Z
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score 10.900809