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Identifying interlayer surface adhesion failure mechanisms in tinplate packaging steels

Chris Melvin, Eifion Jewell Orcid Logo, Jakob Miedema, Koen Lammers, Arnoud Vooys, Andrew Allman, Neil McMurray, Hamilton McMurray

Packaging Technology and Science

Swansea University Authors: Eifion Jewell Orcid Logo, Hamilton McMurray

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DOI (Published version): 10.1002/pts.2443

Abstract

Tinplate surface morphology and chemistry is adjusted during the manufacturing process in order to meet the demands of its subsequent product use, the commonest being visual appearance and food packaging stability. A comprehensive experimental study on an industrial tinning line varied the surface r...

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Published in: Packaging Technology and Science
ISSN: 0894-3214 1099-1522
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa50509
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first_indexed 2019-06-05T11:07:40Z
last_indexed 2019-07-18T21:35:40Z
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spelling 2019-07-18T15:48:15.2688787 v2 50509 2019-05-23 Identifying interlayer surface adhesion failure mechanisms in tinplate packaging steels 13dc152c178d51abfe0634445b0acf07 0000-0002-6894-2251 Eifion Jewell Eifion Jewell true false 56fc1b17ffc3bdf6039dc05c6eba7f2a Hamilton McMurray Hamilton McMurray true false 2019-05-23 MECH Tinplate surface morphology and chemistry is adjusted during the manufacturing process in order to meet the demands of its subsequent product use, the commonest being visual appearance and food packaging stability. A comprehensive experimental study on an industrial tinning line varied the surface roughness and the tin coating weight with the characterization through X‐ray diffraction (XRD), X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), white light interferometer (WLI), optical imaging, and lacquer adhesion measurement. Increasing tin weight lowers the adhesion through the production of a thicker disorganized tin oxide layer which has a greater tendency to fracture under shearing forces. There is no evidence that the substrate roughness improves the adhesion of the lacquer. Analysis of the failure location identifies fracture in the tin oxide layer below the passivation layer. The findings have impacts on the next generation of passivation materials for tinplate as it has been clearly demonstrated that growth in tin oxide thickness, particularly when unstructured, has a detrimental impact on lacquer adhesion. Journal Article Packaging Technology and Science 0894-3214 1099-1522 31 12 2019 2019-12-31 10.1002/pts.2443 COLLEGE NANME Mechanical Engineering COLLEGE CODE MECH Swansea University 2019-07-18T15:48:15.2688787 2019-05-23T13:40:26.8492523 College of Engineering Engineering Chris Melvin 1 Eifion Jewell 0000-0002-6894-2251 2 Jakob Miedema 3 Koen Lammers 4 Arnoud Vooys 5 Andrew Allman 6 Neil McMurray 7 Hamilton McMurray 8 0050509-05062019150641.pdf melvin2019.pdf 2019-06-05T15:06:41.3100000 Output 9276025 application/pdf Version of Record true 2019-06-05T00:00:00.0000000 Distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY-4.0) true eng
title Identifying interlayer surface adhesion failure mechanisms in tinplate packaging steels
spellingShingle Identifying interlayer surface adhesion failure mechanisms in tinplate packaging steels
Eifion Jewell
Hamilton McMurray
title_short Identifying interlayer surface adhesion failure mechanisms in tinplate packaging steels
title_full Identifying interlayer surface adhesion failure mechanisms in tinplate packaging steels
title_fullStr Identifying interlayer surface adhesion failure mechanisms in tinplate packaging steels
title_full_unstemmed Identifying interlayer surface adhesion failure mechanisms in tinplate packaging steels
title_sort Identifying interlayer surface adhesion failure mechanisms in tinplate packaging steels
author_id_str_mv 13dc152c178d51abfe0634445b0acf07
56fc1b17ffc3bdf6039dc05c6eba7f2a
author_id_fullname_str_mv 13dc152c178d51abfe0634445b0acf07_***_Eifion Jewell
56fc1b17ffc3bdf6039dc05c6eba7f2a_***_Hamilton McMurray
author Eifion Jewell
Hamilton McMurray
author2 Chris Melvin
Eifion Jewell
Jakob Miedema
Koen Lammers
Arnoud Vooys
Andrew Allman
Neil McMurray
Hamilton McMurray
format Journal article
container_title Packaging Technology and Science
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 0894-3214
1099-1522
doi_str_mv 10.1002/pts.2443
college_str College of Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Tinplate surface morphology and chemistry is adjusted during the manufacturing process in order to meet the demands of its subsequent product use, the commonest being visual appearance and food packaging stability. A comprehensive experimental study on an industrial tinning line varied the surface roughness and the tin coating weight with the characterization through X‐ray diffraction (XRD), X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), white light interferometer (WLI), optical imaging, and lacquer adhesion measurement. Increasing tin weight lowers the adhesion through the production of a thicker disorganized tin oxide layer which has a greater tendency to fracture under shearing forces. There is no evidence that the substrate roughness improves the adhesion of the lacquer. Analysis of the failure location identifies fracture in the tin oxide layer below the passivation layer. The findings have impacts on the next generation of passivation materials for tinplate as it has been clearly demonstrated that growth in tin oxide thickness, particularly when unstructured, has a detrimental impact on lacquer adhesion.
published_date 2019-12-31T04:20:00Z
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score 10.87241