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Spirituality and Religion in the life of Muslim and Islamist prisoners: Egypt and the UK as case studies

Salwa El-Awa Orcid Logo

Spiritual Counselling and Care in Health and Prison Services: Diverse Experiences & Practices, Pages: 99 - 128

Swansea University Author: Salwa El-Awa Orcid Logo

Abstract

This paper explores ways in which individuals deemed at risk of violent extremism can be supported, spiritually and religiously. Spirituality and religion both involve meaning-seeking (Gilbert, 2014), whilst Maslow’s hierarchy of needs posits that all humans have certain needs, and that once the mos...

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Published in: Spiritual Counselling and Care in Health and Prison Services: Diverse Experiences & Practices
ISBN: 978-605-80183-7-2
Published: Istanbul Centre for Education Values Publication House 2020
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa50537
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spelling v2 50537 2019-05-27 Spirituality and Religion in the life of Muslim and Islamist prisoners: Egypt and the UK as case studies 405f7cf25595f68f9bff6c5af640fdda 0000-0002-1879-633X Salwa El-Awa Salwa El-Awa true false 2019-05-27 AMOD This paper explores ways in which individuals deemed at risk of violent extremism can be supported, spiritually and religiously. Spirituality and religion both involve meaning-seeking (Gilbert, 2014), whilst Maslow’s hierarchy of needs posits that all humans have certain needs, and that once the most basic biological and physiological requirements are met humans will seek to satisfy higher-order desires such as the need for transcendence which includes the need to pursue various political, religious and other ideologies and belief systems (Maslow, 1970). Research on violent extremism suggests that radicalisation can involve the search for identity, meaning, belongingness (Guittet et al.2014), as such initiatives aimed at supporting those deemed at risk of violent extremism (including those individuals who have committed acts of terrorism) implicitly involve a focus on spirituality and/or religion. This article sets out some of the ways in which spiritual-religious counselling and care can be and are applied to violent extremists (and those deemed at risk of extremism), both inside and outside of a prison setting. The article draws on research by both authors, in the context of the UK and in the Middle East, and looks at mentoring, counselling and other community-based initiatives aimed at violent extremists. The authors argue that a spiritual-religious focus by practitioners and community members is central when engaging with violent extremists and those deemed at risk of violent extremism. The authors draw upon spiritual and religious frameworks of understanding to explore the support that is currently provided to violent extremists and those deemed at risk of violent extremism. The authors also highlight some of the challenges of providing spiritual-religious care, particularly in the context of radicalisation in prisons, the supervision of services, working within multi-ethnic and multi-faith societies, and the pressures placed upon practitioners and community members. Book chapter Spiritual Counselling and Care in Health and Prison Services: Diverse Experiences & Practices 99 128 Centre for Education Values Publication House Istanbul 978-605-80183-7-2 Spirituality; prison; islamist; Islamic prisoners; Egypt 31 12 2020 2020-12-31 COLLEGE NANME Modern Languages COLLEGE CODE AMOD Swansea University 2022-09-29T14:46:25.2934813 2019-05-27T14:51:40.7880246 College of Arts and Humanities Modern Languages Salwa El-Awa 0000-0002-1879-633X 1
title Spirituality and Religion in the life of Muslim and Islamist prisoners: Egypt and the UK as case studies
spellingShingle Spirituality and Religion in the life of Muslim and Islamist prisoners: Egypt and the UK as case studies
Salwa El-Awa
title_short Spirituality and Religion in the life of Muslim and Islamist prisoners: Egypt and the UK as case studies
title_full Spirituality and Religion in the life of Muslim and Islamist prisoners: Egypt and the UK as case studies
title_fullStr Spirituality and Religion in the life of Muslim and Islamist prisoners: Egypt and the UK as case studies
title_full_unstemmed Spirituality and Religion in the life of Muslim and Islamist prisoners: Egypt and the UK as case studies
title_sort Spirituality and Religion in the life of Muslim and Islamist prisoners: Egypt and the UK as case studies
author_id_str_mv 405f7cf25595f68f9bff6c5af640fdda
author_id_fullname_str_mv 405f7cf25595f68f9bff6c5af640fdda_***_Salwa El-Awa
author Salwa El-Awa
author2 Salwa El-Awa
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container_title Spiritual Counselling and Care in Health and Prison Services: Diverse Experiences & Practices
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publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
isbn 978-605-80183-7-2
publisher Centre for Education Values Publication House
college_str College of Arts and Humanities
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hierarchy_top_title College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_parent_title College of Arts and Humanities
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description This paper explores ways in which individuals deemed at risk of violent extremism can be supported, spiritually and religiously. Spirituality and religion both involve meaning-seeking (Gilbert, 2014), whilst Maslow’s hierarchy of needs posits that all humans have certain needs, and that once the most basic biological and physiological requirements are met humans will seek to satisfy higher-order desires such as the need for transcendence which includes the need to pursue various political, religious and other ideologies and belief systems (Maslow, 1970). Research on violent extremism suggests that radicalisation can involve the search for identity, meaning, belongingness (Guittet et al.2014), as such initiatives aimed at supporting those deemed at risk of violent extremism (including those individuals who have committed acts of terrorism) implicitly involve a focus on spirituality and/or religion. This article sets out some of the ways in which spiritual-religious counselling and care can be and are applied to violent extremists (and those deemed at risk of extremism), both inside and outside of a prison setting. The article draws on research by both authors, in the context of the UK and in the Middle East, and looks at mentoring, counselling and other community-based initiatives aimed at violent extremists. The authors argue that a spiritual-religious focus by practitioners and community members is central when engaging with violent extremists and those deemed at risk of violent extremism. The authors draw upon spiritual and religious frameworks of understanding to explore the support that is currently provided to violent extremists and those deemed at risk of violent extremism. The authors also highlight some of the challenges of providing spiritual-religious care, particularly in the context of radicalisation in prisons, the supervision of services, working within multi-ethnic and multi-faith societies, and the pressures placed upon practitioners and community members.
published_date 2020-12-31T14:46:23Z
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