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‘What’s the point in extending your life if this is your life’: A qualitative exploration of pre-surgery, short-term and long-term responses to bariatric surgery / Stephanie. J. Hanley, Camilla Knight, Nicole. M. Glenn, Jeffery. W. Stephens, Richard Bracken

Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, Volume: 12, Issue: 4, Pages: 530 - 547

Swansea University Authors: Camilla Knight, Richard Bracken

Abstract

This study examined experiences of weight, physical activity, diet, and quality of life of individuals prior to and following bariatric surgery. Twenty-seven people participated who represented three periods related to bariatric surgery: pre-surgery; short-term post-surgery (i.e., 1–2 years) and lon...

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Published in: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health
ISSN: 2159-676X 2159-6778
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa50999
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spelling 2020-08-10T11:44:49.8162401 v2 50999 2019-07-03 ‘What’s the point in extending your life if this is your life’: A qualitative exploration of pre-surgery, short-term and long-term responses to bariatric surgery 6c81176f7e92c7c04ff6cfb8f1a0ed60 0000-0001-5806-6887 Camilla Knight Camilla Knight true false f5da81cd18adfdedb2ccb845bddc12f7 0000-0002-6986-6449 Richard Bracken Richard Bracken true false 2019-07-03 STSC This study examined experiences of weight, physical activity, diet, and quality of life of individuals prior to and following bariatric surgery. Twenty-seven people participated who represented three periods related to bariatric surgery: pre-surgery; short-term post-surgery (i.e., 1–2 years) and long-term post-surgery (i.e., 3–7 years). A qualitative descriptive design was adopted, with data collected through interviews and analysed using thematic analysis. Themes in the pre-surgery period were identified as follows: a) Growing up: Variation by family and ability, b) Weight gain: Transitions, traumas, and triggers; c) Perceptions of self: Hate, loathing, and worthlessness; d) Spiralling weight: Lack of control over vicious cycles of dieting and weight gain, and; e) Surgery: A final and essential lifeline. Short-term post-surgery themes were: a) Physical changes: Rapid weight loss and enhanced health versus hesitation and disappointment; b) Physical activity: Changes in engagement and perceptions despite ongoing barriers; c) Finding oneself: Increased emotional wellbeing, self-concept and confidence, and; d) Quality of life: Renewed physical capabilities and capacity but some continuing challenges. In the long-term following surgery, themes of: a) Weight plateau/regain: Disappointment and feelings of failure, and; b) Excess fat: Frustration and feelings of vulnerability emerged from the data. It is evident that participants go on an extended journey in the years before and after bariatric surgery and experience a range of both positive and negative outcomes. Overall, the findings highlight the importance of practitioners understanding individual’s overall journeys when seeking to help them lose weight and improve psychological health. Journal Article Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health 12 4 530 547 2159-676X 2159-6778 Bariatric surgery, weight loss, physical activity, diet, quality of life 31 12 2019 2019-12-31 10.1080/2159676X.2019.1640779 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2020-08-10T11:44:49.8162401 2019-07-03T14:45:38.3336766 College of Engineering Sports Science Stephanie. J. Hanley 1 Camilla Knight 0000-0001-5806-6887 2 Nicole. M. Glenn 3 Jeffery. W. Stephens 4 Richard Bracken 0000-0002-6986-6449 5 0050999-03072019144653.pdf hanley2019.pdf 2019-07-03T14:46:53.5230000 Output 345262 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2020-07-17T00:00:00.0000000 false eng
title ‘What’s the point in extending your life if this is your life’: A qualitative exploration of pre-surgery, short-term and long-term responses to bariatric surgery
spellingShingle ‘What’s the point in extending your life if this is your life’: A qualitative exploration of pre-surgery, short-term and long-term responses to bariatric surgery
Camilla, Knight
Richard, Bracken
title_short ‘What’s the point in extending your life if this is your life’: A qualitative exploration of pre-surgery, short-term and long-term responses to bariatric surgery
title_full ‘What’s the point in extending your life if this is your life’: A qualitative exploration of pre-surgery, short-term and long-term responses to bariatric surgery
title_fullStr ‘What’s the point in extending your life if this is your life’: A qualitative exploration of pre-surgery, short-term and long-term responses to bariatric surgery
title_full_unstemmed ‘What’s the point in extending your life if this is your life’: A qualitative exploration of pre-surgery, short-term and long-term responses to bariatric surgery
title_sort ‘What’s the point in extending your life if this is your life’: A qualitative exploration of pre-surgery, short-term and long-term responses to bariatric surgery
author_id_str_mv 6c81176f7e92c7c04ff6cfb8f1a0ed60
f5da81cd18adfdedb2ccb845bddc12f7
author_id_fullname_str_mv 6c81176f7e92c7c04ff6cfb8f1a0ed60_***_Camilla, Knight
f5da81cd18adfdedb2ccb845bddc12f7_***_Richard, Bracken
author Camilla, Knight
Richard, Bracken
author2 Stephanie. J. Hanley
Camilla Knight
Nicole. M. Glenn
Jeffery. W. Stephens
Richard Bracken
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
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description This study examined experiences of weight, physical activity, diet, and quality of life of individuals prior to and following bariatric surgery. Twenty-seven people participated who represented three periods related to bariatric surgery: pre-surgery; short-term post-surgery (i.e., 1–2 years) and long-term post-surgery (i.e., 3–7 years). A qualitative descriptive design was adopted, with data collected through interviews and analysed using thematic analysis. Themes in the pre-surgery period were identified as follows: a) Growing up: Variation by family and ability, b) Weight gain: Transitions, traumas, and triggers; c) Perceptions of self: Hate, loathing, and worthlessness; d) Spiralling weight: Lack of control over vicious cycles of dieting and weight gain, and; e) Surgery: A final and essential lifeline. Short-term post-surgery themes were: a) Physical changes: Rapid weight loss and enhanced health versus hesitation and disappointment; b) Physical activity: Changes in engagement and perceptions despite ongoing barriers; c) Finding oneself: Increased emotional wellbeing, self-concept and confidence, and; d) Quality of life: Renewed physical capabilities and capacity but some continuing challenges. In the long-term following surgery, themes of: a) Weight plateau/regain: Disappointment and feelings of failure, and; b) Excess fat: Frustration and feelings of vulnerability emerged from the data. It is evident that participants go on an extended journey in the years before and after bariatric surgery and experience a range of both positive and negative outcomes. Overall, the findings highlight the importance of practitioners understanding individual’s overall journeys when seeking to help them lose weight and improve psychological health.
published_date 2019-12-31T04:10:42Z
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