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Indexing Cultural Heritage Resources for Research and Education / Christophe Gueret; Tom Crick

Digital Humanities (DH 2019)

Swansea University Author: Crick, Tom

Abstract

In an increasingly digital world, e-infrastructure has become a key component of the daily life of researchers, underpinning a variety of research and academic activities. Over the period 2014-2020 the development of these infrastructures is supported by €850M of funding from the European Commission...

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Published in: Digital Humanities (DH 2019)
Published: Utrecht, Netherlands 2019
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa51074
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Abstract: In an increasingly digital world, e-infrastructure has become a key component of the daily life of researchers, underpinning a variety of research and academic activities. Over the period 2014-2020 the development of these infrastructures is supported by €850M of funding from the European Commission. Those systems at the core of data-driven science are expected to not only contribute to the scientific discoveries but to also play a larger role in society. This paper reports on the results of a specific project, which engaged with cultural heritage content in the UK based on Linked Data principles. Its core is an open platform which indexes and organises the digital collections of libraries, museums, broadcasters and galleries to make their content more discoverable, accessible and usable to those in UK education and research. Among them are images, TV and radio programmes, documents and text from world class organisations such as the British Museum, British Library, National Archives, Europeana, Wellcome Trust and the BBC.Next to linking content, the project also supported developers to create digital educational products that will inspire learners, teachers and researchers by using applications powered by the Research and Education Space (RES) platform. This paper discusses the challenges faced by the project, the architecture developed for tackling them, and the lessons learned. In particular, we address challenges for consuming Web data; the problem of co-referencing (how to deal with the fact that several URI's can be created to refer to the same thing); and most prominently the problem of licensing. In particular, we discuss how the lack of unambiguous declarations of copyright and license as metadata are hampering the re-use of existing published data, and which methods have been tested so far to circumvent this problem. The paper closes with an inspection of other existing collections and platforms and a discussion on how they solve the above listed problems.
Item Description: Part of a symposium entitled: "Curating and Archiving Linked Data Datasets from the Humanities -- From Data of the Present to Data of the Future"
College: College of Arts and Humanities