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Asthma, body mass and aerobic fitness, the relationship in adolescents: The exercise for asthma with commando Joe’s® (X4ACJ) trial

Charles Winn, Kelly Mackintosh Orcid Logo, William Eddolls, Gareth Stratton Orcid Logo, Andrew M. Wilson, Gwyneth Davies Orcid Logo, Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo

Journal of Sports Sciences, Pages: 1 - 8

Swansea University Authors: Charles Winn, Kelly Mackintosh Orcid Logo, William Eddolls, Gareth Stratton Orcid Logo, Gwyneth Davies Orcid Logo, Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo

Abstract

Although an association has been suggested between asthma, obesity, fitness and physical activity, the relationship between these parameters remains to be elucidated in adolescents. Six-hundred and sixteen adolescents were recruited (334 boys; 13.0 ± 1.1years; 1.57 ± 0.10m; 52.6 ± 12.9kg), of which...

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Published in: Journal of Sports Sciences
ISSN: 0264-0414 1466-447X
Published: Informa UK Limited 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa51106
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Six-hundred and sixteen adolescents were recruited (334 boys; 13.0 &#xB1; 1.1years; 1.57 &#xB1; 0.10m; 52.6 &#xB1; 12.9kg), of which 155 suffered from mild-to-moderate asthma (78 boys). Participants completed a 20-metre shuttle run test, lung function and 7-day objective physical activity measurements and completed asthma control and quality of life questionnaires. Furthermore, 69 adolescents (36 asthma; 21 boys) completed an incremental ramp cycle ergometer test. Although participants with asthma completed significantly fewer shuttle runs than their peers, peak V&#x307;O2 did not differ between the groups. However, adolescents with asthma engaged in less physical activity (53.9 &#xB1; 23.5 vs 60.5 &#xB1; 23.6minutes) and had higher BMI (22.2 &#xB1; 4.8 vs 20.4 &#xB1; 3.7kg&#xB7;m-2), than their peers. Whilst a significant relationship was found between quality of life and cardiorespiratory fitness according to peak V&#x307;O2, only BMI was revealed as a significant predictor of asthma status. The current findings highlight the need to use accurate measures of cardiorespiratory fitness rather than indirect estimates to assess the influence of asthma during adolescence. 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spelling 2019-07-17T10:48:22.8707447 v2 51106 2019-07-17 Asthma, body mass and aerobic fitness, the relationship in adolescents: The exercise for asthma with commando Joe’s® (X4ACJ) trial c06badc5ccb752878ad3bdd04a7d9a1c Charles Winn Charles Winn true false bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214 0000-0003-0355-6357 Kelly Mackintosh Kelly Mackintosh true false 417a327e5afb7838f7a462e69a86207d William Eddolls William Eddolls true false 6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01 0000-0001-5618-0803 Gareth Stratton Gareth Stratton true false 92d69cf8519a334ced3f55142c811d95 0000-0003-1218-1008 Gwyneth Davies Gwyneth Davies true false 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false 2019-07-17 FGSEN Although an association has been suggested between asthma, obesity, fitness and physical activity, the relationship between these parameters remains to be elucidated in adolescents. Six-hundred and sixteen adolescents were recruited (334 boys; 13.0 ± 1.1years; 1.57 ± 0.10m; 52.6 ± 12.9kg), of which 155 suffered from mild-to-moderate asthma (78 boys). Participants completed a 20-metre shuttle run test, lung function and 7-day objective physical activity measurements and completed asthma control and quality of life questionnaires. Furthermore, 69 adolescents (36 asthma; 21 boys) completed an incremental ramp cycle ergometer test. Although participants with asthma completed significantly fewer shuttle runs than their peers, peak V̇O2 did not differ between the groups. However, adolescents with asthma engaged in less physical activity (53.9 ± 23.5 vs 60.5 ± 23.6minutes) and had higher BMI (22.2 ± 4.8 vs 20.4 ± 3.7kg·m-2), than their peers. Whilst a significant relationship was found between quality of life and cardiorespiratory fitness according to peak V̇O2, only BMI was revealed as a significant predictor of asthma status. The current findings highlight the need to use accurate measures of cardiorespiratory fitness rather than indirect estimates to assess the influence of asthma during adolescence. Furthermore, the present study suggests that BMI and fitness may be key targets for future interventions seeking to improve asthma quality of life. Journal Article Journal of Sports Sciences 1 8 Informa UK Limited 0264-0414 1466-447X Obesity, quality of life, lung function, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness 27 11 2019 2019-11-27 10.1080/02640414.2019.1696729 COLLEGE NANME Science and Engineering - Faculty COLLEGE CODE FGSEN Swansea University 2019-07-17T10:48:22.8707447 2019-07-17T10:44:35.6299181 Charles Winn 1 Kelly Mackintosh 0000-0003-0355-6357 2 William Eddolls 3 Gareth Stratton 0000-0001-5618-0803 4 Andrew M. Wilson 5 Gwyneth Davies 0000-0003-1218-1008 6 Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 7 51106__14695__cc015792b8824d358e5fcf7d6f40831e.pdf winn2019(3)v3.pdf 2019-07-17T10:48:22.8700000 Output 691832 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2020-11-27T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Asthma, body mass and aerobic fitness, the relationship in adolescents: The exercise for asthma with commando Joe’s® (X4ACJ) trial
spellingShingle Asthma, body mass and aerobic fitness, the relationship in adolescents: The exercise for asthma with commando Joe’s® (X4ACJ) trial
Charles Winn
Kelly Mackintosh
William Eddolls
Gareth Stratton
Gwyneth Davies
Melitta McNarry
title_short Asthma, body mass and aerobic fitness, the relationship in adolescents: The exercise for asthma with commando Joe’s® (X4ACJ) trial
title_full Asthma, body mass and aerobic fitness, the relationship in adolescents: The exercise for asthma with commando Joe’s® (X4ACJ) trial
title_fullStr Asthma, body mass and aerobic fitness, the relationship in adolescents: The exercise for asthma with commando Joe’s® (X4ACJ) trial
title_full_unstemmed Asthma, body mass and aerobic fitness, the relationship in adolescents: The exercise for asthma with commando Joe’s® (X4ACJ) trial
title_sort Asthma, body mass and aerobic fitness, the relationship in adolescents: The exercise for asthma with commando Joe’s® (X4ACJ) trial
author_id_str_mv c06badc5ccb752878ad3bdd04a7d9a1c
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214
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6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01
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author_id_fullname_str_mv c06badc5ccb752878ad3bdd04a7d9a1c_***_Charles Winn
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214_***_Kelly Mackintosh
417a327e5afb7838f7a462e69a86207d_***_William Eddolls
6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01_***_Gareth Stratton
92d69cf8519a334ced3f55142c811d95_***_Gwyneth Davies
062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta McNarry
author Charles Winn
Kelly Mackintosh
William Eddolls
Gareth Stratton
Gwyneth Davies
Melitta McNarry
author2 Charles Winn
Kelly Mackintosh
William Eddolls
Gareth Stratton
Andrew M. Wilson
Gwyneth Davies
Melitta McNarry
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Sports Sciences
container_start_page 1
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 0264-0414
1466-447X
doi_str_mv 10.1080/02640414.2019.1696729
publisher Informa UK Limited
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Although an association has been suggested between asthma, obesity, fitness and physical activity, the relationship between these parameters remains to be elucidated in adolescents. Six-hundred and sixteen adolescents were recruited (334 boys; 13.0 ± 1.1years; 1.57 ± 0.10m; 52.6 ± 12.9kg), of which 155 suffered from mild-to-moderate asthma (78 boys). Participants completed a 20-metre shuttle run test, lung function and 7-day objective physical activity measurements and completed asthma control and quality of life questionnaires. Furthermore, 69 adolescents (36 asthma; 21 boys) completed an incremental ramp cycle ergometer test. Although participants with asthma completed significantly fewer shuttle runs than their peers, peak V̇O2 did not differ between the groups. However, adolescents with asthma engaged in less physical activity (53.9 ± 23.5 vs 60.5 ± 23.6minutes) and had higher BMI (22.2 ± 4.8 vs 20.4 ± 3.7kg·m-2), than their peers. Whilst a significant relationship was found between quality of life and cardiorespiratory fitness according to peak V̇O2, only BMI was revealed as a significant predictor of asthma status. The current findings highlight the need to use accurate measures of cardiorespiratory fitness rather than indirect estimates to assess the influence of asthma during adolescence. Furthermore, the present study suggests that BMI and fitness may be key targets for future interventions seeking to improve asthma quality of life.
published_date 2019-11-27T04:04:40Z
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