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Transcriptomic response to aquaculture intensification in Nile tilapia / Deiene Rodriguez‐Barreto, Olivier Rey, Tamsyn Uren Webster, Giovanni Castaldo, Sonia Consuegra, Carlos Garcia De Leaniz, S Consuegra del Olmo

Evolutionary Applications, Volume: 12, Issue: 9, Pages: 1757 - 1771

Swansea University Authors: Tamsyn Uren Webster, Carlos Garcia De Leaniz, S Consuegra del Olmo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/eva.12830

Abstract

To meet future global demand for fish protein, more fish will need to be farmed usingfewer resources, and this will require the selection of nonaggressive individuals thatperform well at high densities. Yet, the genetic changes underlying loss of aggressionand adaptation to crowding during aquacultu...

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Published in: Evolutionary Applications
ISSN: 1752-4571 1752-4571
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa51134
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Yet, the genetic changes underlying loss of aggressionand adaptation to crowding during aquaculture intensification are largely unknown.We examined the transcriptomic response to aggression and crowding in Nile tilapia,one of the oldest and most widespread farmed fish, whose social structure shiftsfrom social hierarchies to shoaling with increasing density. A mirror test was usedto quantify aggression and skin darkening (a proxy for stress) of fish reared at lowand high densities, and gene expression in the hypothalamus was analysed amongthe most and least aggressive fish at each density. Fish reared at high density weredarker, had larger brains, were less active and less aggressive than those reared atlow density and had differentially expressed genes consistent with a reactive stress-copingstyle and activation of the hypothalamus&#x2013;pituitary&#x2013;interrenal (HPI) axis.Differences in gene expression among aggressive fish were accounted for by densityand the interaction between density and aggression levels, whereas for non-aggressivefish differences in gene expression were associated with individual variation inskin brightness and social stress. Thus, the response to crowding in Nile tilapia iscontext dependent and involves different neuro-endocrine pathways, depending onsocial status. 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spelling 2020-10-21T14:32:43.2658395 v2 51134 2019-07-18 Transcriptomic response to aquaculture intensification in Nile tilapia 3ea91c154926c86f89ea6a761122ecf6 0000-0002-0072-9745 Tamsyn Uren Webster Tamsyn Uren Webster true false 1c70acd0fd64edb0856b7cf34393ab02 0000-0003-1650-2729 Carlos Garcia De Leaniz Carlos Garcia De Leaniz true false 241f2810ab8f56be53ca8af23e384c6e 0000-0003-4403-2509 S Consuegra del Olmo S Consuegra del Olmo true false 2019-07-18 SBI To meet future global demand for fish protein, more fish will need to be farmed usingfewer resources, and this will require the selection of nonaggressive individuals thatperform well at high densities. Yet, the genetic changes underlying loss of aggressionand adaptation to crowding during aquaculture intensification are largely unknown.We examined the transcriptomic response to aggression and crowding in Nile tilapia,one of the oldest and most widespread farmed fish, whose social structure shiftsfrom social hierarchies to shoaling with increasing density. A mirror test was usedto quantify aggression and skin darkening (a proxy for stress) of fish reared at lowand high densities, and gene expression in the hypothalamus was analysed amongthe most and least aggressive fish at each density. Fish reared at high density weredarker, had larger brains, were less active and less aggressive than those reared atlow density and had differentially expressed genes consistent with a reactive stress-copingstyle and activation of the hypothalamus–pituitary–interrenal (HPI) axis.Differences in gene expression among aggressive fish were accounted for by densityand the interaction between density and aggression levels, whereas for non-aggressivefish differences in gene expression were associated with individual variation inskin brightness and social stress. Thus, the response to crowding in Nile tilapia iscontext dependent and involves different neuro-endocrine pathways, depending onsocial status. Knowledge of genes associated with the response to crowding maypave the way for more efficient fish domestication, based on the selection of non-aggressiveindividuals with increasing tolerance to chronic stress necessary for aquacultureintensification. Journal Article Evolutionary Applications 12 9 1757 1771 1752-4571 1752-4571 aggression, aquaculture intensification, crowding, fish domestication, gene expression, HPI axis, stress response 31 10 2019 2019-10-31 10.1111/eva.12830 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2020-10-21T14:32:43.2658395 2019-07-18T19:11:18.0434851 Deiene Rodriguez‐Barreto 1 Olivier Rey 2 Tamsyn Uren Webster 0000-0002-0072-9745 3 Giovanni Castaldo 4 Sonia Consuegra 5 Carlos Garcia De Leaniz 0000-0003-1650-2729 6 S Consuegra del Olmo 0000-0003-4403-2509 7 0051134-25092019145810.pdf 51134.pdf 2019-09-25T14:58:10.0830000 Output 1092955 application/pdf Version of Record true 2019-09-24T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY). true eng
title Transcriptomic response to aquaculture intensification in Nile tilapia
spellingShingle Transcriptomic response to aquaculture intensification in Nile tilapia
Tamsyn, Uren Webster
Carlos, Garcia De Leaniz
S, Consuegra del Olmo
title_short Transcriptomic response to aquaculture intensification in Nile tilapia
title_full Transcriptomic response to aquaculture intensification in Nile tilapia
title_fullStr Transcriptomic response to aquaculture intensification in Nile tilapia
title_full_unstemmed Transcriptomic response to aquaculture intensification in Nile tilapia
title_sort Transcriptomic response to aquaculture intensification in Nile tilapia
author_id_str_mv 3ea91c154926c86f89ea6a761122ecf6
1c70acd0fd64edb0856b7cf34393ab02
241f2810ab8f56be53ca8af23e384c6e
author_id_fullname_str_mv 3ea91c154926c86f89ea6a761122ecf6_***_Tamsyn, Uren Webster
1c70acd0fd64edb0856b7cf34393ab02_***_Carlos, Garcia De Leaniz
241f2810ab8f56be53ca8af23e384c6e_***_S, Consuegra del Olmo
author Tamsyn, Uren Webster
Carlos, Garcia De Leaniz
S, Consuegra del Olmo
author2 Deiene Rodriguez‐Barreto
Olivier Rey
Tamsyn Uren Webster
Giovanni Castaldo
Sonia Consuegra
Carlos Garcia De Leaniz
S Consuegra del Olmo
format Journal article
container_title Evolutionary Applications
container_volume 12
container_issue 9
container_start_page 1757
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 1752-4571
1752-4571
doi_str_mv 10.1111/eva.12830
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description To meet future global demand for fish protein, more fish will need to be farmed usingfewer resources, and this will require the selection of nonaggressive individuals thatperform well at high densities. Yet, the genetic changes underlying loss of aggressionand adaptation to crowding during aquaculture intensification are largely unknown.We examined the transcriptomic response to aggression and crowding in Nile tilapia,one of the oldest and most widespread farmed fish, whose social structure shiftsfrom social hierarchies to shoaling with increasing density. A mirror test was usedto quantify aggression and skin darkening (a proxy for stress) of fish reared at lowand high densities, and gene expression in the hypothalamus was analysed amongthe most and least aggressive fish at each density. Fish reared at high density weredarker, had larger brains, were less active and less aggressive than those reared atlow density and had differentially expressed genes consistent with a reactive stress-copingstyle and activation of the hypothalamus–pituitary–interrenal (HPI) axis.Differences in gene expression among aggressive fish were accounted for by densityand the interaction between density and aggression levels, whereas for non-aggressivefish differences in gene expression were associated with individual variation inskin brightness and social stress. Thus, the response to crowding in Nile tilapia iscontext dependent and involves different neuro-endocrine pathways, depending onsocial status. Knowledge of genes associated with the response to crowding maypave the way for more efficient fish domestication, based on the selection of non-aggressiveindividuals with increasing tolerance to chronic stress necessary for aquacultureintensification.
published_date 2019-10-31T04:07:38Z
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