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Paramedics’ experiences of administering fascia iliaca compartment block to patients in South Wales with suspected hip fracture at the scene of injury: results of focus groups / Bridie Evans; Bridie Angela Evans; Alan Brown; Jenna Bulger; Greg Fegan; Simon Ford; Katy Guy; SIan Jones; Leigh Keen; Ashrafunnesa Khanom; Mirella Longo; Ian Pallister; Nigel Rees; Ian T Russell; Anne C Seagrove; Alan Watkins; Helen Snooks

BMJ Open, Volume: 9, Issue: 2, Start page: e026073

Swansea University Authors: Bridie, Evans, Greg, Fegan, Alan, Watkins, Helen, Snooks

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Abstract

Objectives To explore paramedics’ experience of delivering fascia iliaca compartment block (FICB) to patients with suspected hip fracture at the scene of injury.Design Focus groups within a randomised controlled trial.Setting Paramedics based at ambulance stations in the catchment area of one Emerge...

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Published in: BMJ Open
ISSN: 2044-6055 2044-6055
Published: 2019
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa51184
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Abstract: Objectives To explore paramedics’ experience of delivering fascia iliaca compartment block (FICB) to patients with suspected hip fracture at the scene of injury.Design Focus groups within a randomised controlled trial.Setting Paramedics based at ambulance stations in the catchment area of one Emergency Department in South Wales, recruited and trained in a feasibility study about an alternative to routine prehospital pain management for patients with suspected hip fracture.Participants 11 paramedics.Intervention Paramedic-administered FICB to patients with suspected hip fracture. We randomly allocated eligible patients to FICB, a local anaesthetic injection directly into the hip region—or usual care, most commonly morphine - using audited scratch cards.Outcomes Paramedics’ experiences of administering FICB gathered through thematic analysis of interview transcripts by two researchers, one paramedic and one lay member.Results Respondents believed that FICB was a suitable intervention for paramedics to deliver. It aligned with routine practice and was within people’s capabilities. They said it took up to 10 minutes longer than usual care to prepare and deliver, in part due to nervousness and unfamiliarity with a new procedure. They praised the training provided but said they were anxious about causing harm by injecting into the wrong location. Confidence increased after one paramedic team successfully treated a patient for local anaesthetic toxicity. Reported challenges related to the emergency context: patients often waited many hours for ambulance arrival; moving patients exacerbated their pain; family and neighbours were present as paramedics administered treatment.Conclusions Paramedics are willing and able to administer FICB to patients with suspected hip fracture before ambulance transport to hospital. Feasibility study findings will inform further research.
College: Swansea University Medical School
Issue: 2
Start Page: e026073